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California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 43, No. 16 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



Sports 

Regals stay 
undefeated. 



See story page 10 



Features 

CLU choir prepares for upcoming tour 



See story page 7 



February 26, 2003 
News 



CLU's problmatic electrical 
system fixed. 



See story page 3 



Boland defeats Smith 



By Jennifer Pfautch and Brian Roberts 
Staff Writers 

Robert Boland will be next year's 
ASCLU president. Boland defeated Kristin 
Smith by 18 votes in the Executive Cabi- 
net elections held Feb. 12. The elections, 
which are held every spring, serve to elect 
the following year's Executive Cabinet 
members. 

"I think [Boland] won because he 
comes off as the typical college student." 
said Jimmy Fox, Boland's campaign man- 
ager. "He's got a good head on his shoul- 
ders and a sense of humor." 

Courtney Parks was elected Programs 
Board director, capturing 225 votes (56 
percent of the votes). Parks beat out Eliz 
Baesler by 5 i votes. 

"My goal was to get my name out and 



meet people." Parks said. "1 knew it was 
going to be a close race. I honestly didn't 
know I was going to win." 

Alex Mallen was chosen for RHA di- 
rector with 55 percent of the votes. Jayson 
Soyster was elected Senate director. Soys- 
ter ran unopposed. 

Students also elected Kristin Mathre as 
the ASCLU controller. The controller is in 
charge of the ASCLU treasury. Mathre won 
the election over junior Holly Hoppman by 
121 votes. 

"[Next year] will be an interesting year, 
to say the least," Hoppman said. "There are 
a lot of new people with no previous Ex- 
ecutive Cabinet experience. It is going to 
be a learning experience for them." 

"I think [the new Executive Cabinet] 
will bring new perspective to CLU," senior 
Danielle Ugas said. 



2003 ASCLU Executive Cabinet Election Results 

ASCLU President: 

Robert Boland - 220 (52%) 

Kristin Smith - 202 (48%) 
RHA Director: 

Ale* Mallen -217 (55%) 

Becky Lewis - 178 (45%) 
Senate Director: 

Jayson Soyster - 369 (95%) 
Programs Board Director: 

Courtney Parks - 225 (56%) 

Eliz Baesler- 174(44%) 
ASCLU Controller: 

Kristin Mathre - 259 (65%) 

Holly Hoppman - 138 (35%) 



CLU celebrates Scandinavian life 



By Gianina Lomedico 
Staff Writer 



The Scandinavian community came to 
visit California Lutheran University for a 
lecture series titled "The Northern Front: 
Scandinavia in World War II — Neutrality, 
Occupation and Resistance." 

The two-day Nordic Spirit Sympo- 
sium event began on Friday, Feb. 14, and 
concluded on Feb. 15 in the Preus-Brandt 
Forum. 

The symposium brought about 150 lis- 
teners from areas such as Sweden, Norway 
and other Nordic countries, some of whom 
were members of the Scandinavian Ameri- 
can Cultural and Historical Foundation. 

The speakers focused on their research. 
Some lectures consisted of analytical mate- 
rial as well as personal experiences. 

"The event educates and entertains the 
audience and gives them an opportunity to 
learn about the Scandinavian heritage," 
said Howard Rockstad, president of the 
SACHF. "It blends in with the academic 
nature of the university." 




Photograph by Gianina Lomed 
CLU students and faculty were joined by members of the community last weekend to 
celebrate and learn about Scandinavian culture during the Nordic Spirit Symposium. 
Steven Koblik, president of the Hun- 



tington Library, Art Collections and Botan- 
ical Gardens, began the lecture series with 
a general overview of four Scandinavian 
countries involved during World War II. 
Their desire was to remain neutral. Sweden 



was the only country that remained neutral 
during 1939-1945. 

The second lecture, "Defiant Courage: 
Norway's Longest World War II Escape," 
was presented by Astrid Karlsen Scott, 
author of many Norwegian culture books. 



Scott told the story of a hunted comman- 
do's escape across northern Norway in the 
Arctic cold, and the more than 60 people 
who risked their own lives to help him. 

It was Linnea Lodge's third time visit- 
ing the CLU campus for the symposium. 
Bom in Canada of Swedish descent, she is 
the president of the Scandinavian Studies 
Association at the University of Alberta. 

"I always enjoy the symposium," 
Lodge said. "The event runs efficiently and 
gives new information most of us don't 
know about." 

Kjell Myhre. an engineer of Norwe- 
gian descent, enjoyed the lecture as well. 
He encourages other CLU students to at- 
tend the next lecture series. 

"History repeats itself," Myhre said. 
"If you do not learn what history teaches 
you, a person might ignore what is taking 
place in present time." 

"The Northern Front — Scandinavia in 
World War II" will continue its discussion 
of Scandinavian history in two parts, be- 
ginning in February 2003 and continuing 
in February 2004. 



Card readers spark debate, financial concerns 



By Brandee Tecson 
Staff Writer 



The passing of a new card reader bill 
sparked a heated debate during Monday 
night's Senate meeting. The Senate bill, 
in conjunction with funding from the New 
West budget and the Residence Life op- 
erational budget, will pay approximately 
$12,000 for second- and third-floor card 
readers to be added to Potenberg, North, 
West and South residence halls, where ap- 
proximately 300 CLU students reside. 

"Card readers are currently placed in 
all residence halls," said Associate Dean of 



Students Michael Fuller. "We are simply 
trying to increase the convenience to stu- 
dents and enhance security." 

Card readers were first installed on 
campus in 1992 and enhancements have 
since been made. During the Rasmussen 
and Janss Hall renovations, card readers 
were added to those halls. They will be 
added over the next two years in conjunc- 
tion with the Afton and Conejo Hall reno- 
vations. 

In addition, the Senate bill will also 
fund the purchase and installation of locks, 
horns and door switches for the remaining 
eight doors in the New West complex. 



"My hope is that in the summer of 
2004 we will be complete," Fuller said. 

However, Senate Director Kristin 
Smith believes that the project could be 
completed much sooner. 

"It could possibly be finished within 
the next month," said Smith, who asserted 
at the meeting that most of the wiring and 
labor is already completed. 

Despite the convenience of the proj- 
ect, many senators opposed the bill for 
financial reasons. Kellie Kocher, one of the 
senators who opposed the bill, said that it 
would not leave much in the Senate budget 
for other projects during the semester. 



"I don't want it to limit us on what we 
can do," Kocher said. "It only leaves us 
$11,000 to work with." 

Other senators would like to see the 
money delegated to other parts of campus, 
rather than just on one focal point. Sopho- 
more Carly Coker believes that the card 
readers would be well worth the money. 

"We would still have money to deal 
with other projects," said Coker, who ini- 
tially sponsored the bill. 

After an intense discussion, the Senate 
remained split on the decision. 

The motion finally passed with a vote 
of 8-4. 



2 The Echo 



Calendar 



February 26, 2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 




today 

february 26 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:I0a.m. 

Church Council 
Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel 
9:11 p.m. 



thursday 

februarv 27 



The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 




friday 

february 28 

Club Lu: Seattle's Best Coffee 
Seattle's Best Coffee 
9 p.m. 

Saturday 

march 1 



Creative Options 
Campus- Wide 
All Day 



Church 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 

Gym 
8 p.m. 



IWJ 



1 



,1 



*> 




Sunday 

march 2 



Intramural Softball 

Gibello Softball Field 
8 a.m. 




monday 

march 3 

ASCLU-C Senate Meeting 
Nygreen 2 
5:15 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
6:30 p.m. 



ASCLU-G Hit I Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
8:30 p.m. 

I camming Association 
Peters 101 
6 p.m. 



tuesday 

march 4 



Sister Friends 

Chapel Lounge 
5:15 p.m. 

Asian Club and Friends 
Pederson Lounge 
6 p.m. 

Bible Study 

Chapel Lounge 
8 p.m. 



Psychology Club Meeting 

Apartment Lounge 
8 p.m. 








Study abroad IN RIMBACH, GERMANY 



Available during the fall or spring 
semesters of the sophomore or 
junior years. 

This academic program is 
designed so that you remain 
enrolled and earn academic 
credits at CLU, but live, study 
and work in residence serving 
as an American tutor at this 
university preparatory school in 



the Odenwald region of Germany, 
approximately 20 miles northeast 
of Heidelberg, Germany. 

In addition to formal academic 
study, the tutor will assist with 
English language conversation 
sessions and with individual 



tutor will also join other teachers 
in leading student trips (possibly 



to France, South-Tyrol in Italy or 
Berlin) and to a number of other 
locations on shorter field trips. 

A minimum of two semesters of 
college German or the equivalent 
is necessary. Contact Dr. Herbert 
Gooch, Director of International 
Studies, Dr. Susan Corey, English 
Department, Dr. Walter Stewart 
or Dr. Paula Eqnatchik, in the 



classi 



: ieds 



TXitors Wanted: ACE Educational 
. Services is looking for bright, enthusiastic, 
reliable, and dedicated people to teach 1 on 
1. in-home SAT 1/11 prep, and academic 
subjects in your area of expertise. Pay starts 
at $l5-20/hr. Transportation required. We 
will train. Hours & scheduling are flexible 
Positions available throughout Los Angeles 
& the Valley. 
If interested, send cover letter & resume 

ACE Educational Services 

ATTN: instructor Miring 

9911 West Pico Blvd., Ste PH-K 

fax: (310) 282-6424 

email: 

instructorhiring@aceeducation.com 

* Include any standardized test scores 



REWARD: A reward is offered for the 
return of a JVC-KDS 580 car stereo face. 
Stolen last week. 

If you have any information, contact: 

The ECHO 

(80S) 493-3465 

Summer Day Camp Help Needed: 

Seeking General Counselors & Specialist 

Instructors. Located just 20 minutes from 

CLU. Staff can earn $2800-3500+ for the 

summer working w/ children outdoors! 

If interested, call: 

<888)784-CAMPor 

visit: www.Morkatcamp.com 

Classified ads can be placed on 

the Calendar page for a flat rate 

regardless of word count. Discount 

available for multiple issue orders. 

Ads arc subject to editing for content 

& clarity. 

CaU: 

(805) 493-3865 



I love You Mom and Pad!!! 
Thank you so so so VERY much for all that 
you have done for we. Even though i way 
riot always show my appreciation, does 
not mean i aw not extremely grateful for 
the wonderful parents you have been and 

continue to be. 
Loving you always 6- forever.. Sister 



Collese Democrats 



1- Meetins of the Semester 



New Day : Wednesday, the 26 th 
7:00pm in Nygreen 6 

Come talk about: 
California Democratic Party Convention, 
What we want to accomplish 
this semester and next year. & 
other up-coming events! 
PIZZA. SODA & any GOODIES 
you request will be served! 
Call me. Mady Stacy. Pres.. if 
you are interested in going or 
have any Q"s 
Room: x2336. Cell: (209) 679-23 1 2. 
Email: eandmad a aol.com. 



Join the College Democrats of CLU at the 

California Democratic Party Convention! 

You don't need to be a member to attend! 
March l^ l ^. Friday - Sunday 

(We're leaving 1:30pm Friday afternoon and will be back Sunday 

evening) 

*It hosts elections for California Young Democrats [CYD] & California 

College Democrats [CCD], which will have sessions you can sit in on. 

"Elected Officials will be there, including Gov. Gray Davis. The Gov. 

will be having a reception on Friday night, and the CDP will throw a 

party Saturday night! 

*Most cost will be covered, and pass fee can be waived if you volunteer 

to do check-in. 

*If you are even slightly interested or have any questions, please don't 

hesitate to contact me, Mady Stacy by: 

*Dorm: (805) 241-2336 *CeII: (209) 679-2312 

"Email: EandMad@aol.com *Room: North 1016, back of 3 rd floor 



German department for further 
information. You may pick up 
application materials from Ms. 
Randy Toland, faculty secretary in 
the Humanities building. 

The deadline for applications for 
the fall semester, 2003 is March 
1,2003. 



Important 

FINANCIAL AID 

Information 



All continuing CLU students seeking 
financial assistance for the 2003- 
2004 academic year must file a 
FAFSA (Free 'Application for Student 
Financial Aid) by the priority deadline 
of March 2, 2003. If you applied last 
year, you must file a Renewal FAFSA 
and if this is your first year of applica- 
tion, you must file a Regular FAFSA 
Students should file ontine by going 
to www.fafsa.ed gov. If you did not file 
online last year, you must first go to 
www.pin.ed gov to apply for a pin. As 
soon as you and your parents (if you 
are a dependent student], receive a 
pin, then you can apply online. Stu- 
dents may also complete and submit 
a paper application available in the 
Financial Aid Office. In addition, stu- 
dents must complete a Reapplication 
for Financial Assistance, which will be 
mailed to you by the CLU Financial Aid 
Office. If you do not receive the form in 
the mail, please stop by the Financial 
Aid Office and ask for one. 

Don't forget, filing early assures you of 
obtaining the maximum assistance for 
which you are eligible AND receiving it 
in a timely manner. If you file after the 
March 2. 2003 deadline, your aid may 
be delayed and possibly reduced! 



If you need help filing for your 
FAFSA, visit Student Support 
Services and they will help you 
file on-line. Assistance is available 
every Friday in February from 10 
to II a.m. in Library room U 7. 



February 26, 2003 



News 



The Echo 3 



Power problems fixed 



By Jennifer Pfautch 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
community, beginning Thursday. Jan. 30 
was baffled with a mystery. Within weeks 
of arriving back to campus from Christmas 
break, students and faculty were faced 
with unexpected power outages. The out- 
ages caught many in the middle of typing 
papers, attending class or showering. Stu- 
dents and faculty wondered why. 

A device in the electrical system called 
a Ground Fault Interrupter helps avoid 
injury or major damage if something in- 
terferes with the system. It does this by 
causing the system to trip, shutting itself 



off. Without this device, it would be more 
likely to blow a transformer, thus causing 
more extensive damage to electrical equip- 
ment. 

"It is like a fire alarm; when you install 
them, you are safer over all, but you are 
going to have false alarms," said Ryan Van 
Ommeren, Director of Facility Operations 
and Planning. 

On Jan. 30 at 3:30 p.m., the system 
tripped causing the first outage. Imme- 
diately. Gary Hargrave, Cal Lutheran*s 
full-time electrician, began investigating. 
Strangely enough, everything checked out 
and further troubleshooting was conducted 
throughout the following week. 

"The campus is divided into three 
grids, L 1 , L2. L3. and through a process of 



controlled outages to test individual grids, 
the problem was isolated to L2, which con- 
tains Thompson, Peters, Humanities, Ed 
Tech, the gym, SUB and the Little Theater. 
L2 was then put on a generator so that it 
would not cause the system to trip again 
resulting in more power outages," Van 
Ommeren said. 

He commented that L2 did not trip the 
generator, but it would have, had it con- 
tained the problem. 

"The problem was in the electrical 
lines or electrical system outside the build- 
ings," Van Ommeren said. 

"It did not really affect us that much." 
junior Tina Sterling said. 

Finally, through the process of elimi- 
nation, the Ground Fault Interrupter and 



a neutral wire, which are attached to the 
Grounding "Buss Bar" in the university's 
electric vault, were tested. 

"It was found that the neutral wire 
was incorrectly attached to the Grounding 
'Buss Bar,'" Van Ommeren said. 

He added that there was also a break in 
the neutral wire in another location. 

"These two things are definitely 
enough to cause the outages," Van Om- 
meren said. 

"I'm glad it's fixed. It made me ap- 
preciate the Caf more," sophomore Sarah 
Bot said. 

While students enjoyed a day off for 
Presidents Day. the electrical problems 
were corrected and are not expected to 
happen again. 



Graduates discuss career options 



By Jessica Laufman 
S TAFi- Writer 



Speakers, representing professions 
from many areas of the communication 
field visited the California Lutheran Uni- 
versity campus Feb. 20. The four speak- 
ers gave insight to building careers in the 
Southern California area. 

Three of the four speakers were recent 
graduates of CLU with the exception of 
Patricia Ramos, who earned her degree 
from the University of Southern Califor- 
nia. The common theme of advice the 
speakers gave to anyone pursuing a career 
in communications was to take the initia- 
tive to network and connect with as many 
people as possible. 

Heidi Creed, a 1999 graduate, got her 
start selling syndicated radio shows for 
Premier Radio, a Clear Channel Commu- 
nications company. She credits her success 
from starting in a small company. She ad- 
vised students to "ask questions and show 
interest in the industry." 

Creed furthered her career path becom- 
ing a project manager for a company called 
Broadcasting Architecture. Her duties 
include event-planning for radio broadcast 
testing in which radio programming is re- 
viewed by different age brackets. 

"Knowing how to operate Microsoft 



Word and Excel is the most valuable skill a 
college graduate entering the professional 
world should possess," Creed said. 

The world of radio really opened 
Creed's eyes about career choices. 

"There are jobs out there that you 
never would have thought people would be 
paid to do," Creed said. 

Sarah Holmes, another 1999 graduate, 
received her marketing communications 
degree the first time it was offered at CLU. 
She is a research analyst for Frank I. Magid 
and Associates. Holmes puts together focus 
groups to analyze the trends of consumers 
in entertainment-related fields including 
Internet sites, video games and television 
programs. Her best advice was "don't be 
afraid of taking any entry level position." 

Patricia Ramos is a public relations co- 
ordinator for Univision KMEX-T.V Chan- 
nel 34 and Telefutura Channel 46. She dis- 
cussed how the demographics of the Los 
Angeles area is changing rapidly due to the 
growing Hispanic population. She advised 
communication majors to become fluent in 
another language like Spanish. 

"Keep up with the pace of the market 
you want to work with," Ramos said. 

Ramos also recommended to anyone 
interested in pursuing a career in broad- 
casting to be well informed. 

"Be the first on the scene; if you 




Photograph by Mike Beaumont 
From left: Heidi Creed, Sarah Holmes and Patricia Ramos discuss careers options in 
the communications field in the Nelson Room last week 



snooze you loose," Ramos said. 

The last speaker of the afternoon was 
Matt Nasby, who graduated in May of 
2002, and spoke of his recent profession as 
a radio disc jockey for Star 106.9 in Palm 
Springs, Calif. Nasby credits his break- 
through into the competitive world of radio 
to his internship experience his senior year 
at Star 98.7 in Los Angeles. 



Nasby became interested in being an 
on-air personality after sneaking into the 
production room at night to record demos. 
Skip Kelly and Lara Scott, Star radio per- 
sonalities, recognized Nasby's talent and 
encouraged him to pursue his career. 

"A lot of people told me I couldn't do 
it, except two people actually in the indus- 
try," Nasby said. 



Panel looks at hip-hop 



177 



By Heather Ladwig 
Staff Writer 



The Committee of Multicultural 
Thought held a one-hour discussion on the 
topic of "Hip-Hop: Purpose for Entertain- 
ment" on Friday, Feb. 2 1 . 

The discussion was led by a panel of 
three students: Mavaddat Javid, of Moor- 
park College, and sophomores Marcus 
Green and Tasha Holman, of California 
Lutheran University. 

For the first 45 minutes Javid, Green 
and Holman discussed several different 
issues of modern day hip-hop. The role of 
money in the industry of rap was the most 
debated of the issues. 

Students were concerned with the lack 
of education towards what their favorite 
rappers, or rap groups, represent. 

Holman pointed out that the average 
rapper's motivation is getting away from 
crime and focusing on how to make money 
from their talent. The problem with their 
music, Holman said, begins when they 
forget where they come from and start sell- 
ing out their talents. 



Once on top, rappers start rapping 
what the record labels tell them to rap 
about, rather than their personal feelings 
and interests. 

"People need to get away from MTV 
and the radio and see what's really out 
there," Holman said. 

Students brought up the importance of 
underground hip-hop, such as groups like 
The Roots. The panel stressed the impor- 
tance of the individual being aware of what 
and whom they support. 

"I thought it was good information to 
many people that take hip-hop for granted. 
There are a lot of people out there that do 
not realize the true origins of hip-hop," 
freshman Derek Rogers said. 

During the last 15 minutes. Dr. Grego- 
ry Freeland of the political science depart- 
ment opened up the room to questions. 

"As young individuals, we need to 
take it and embrace it and look for the 
individual meaning in Hip-Hop," Holman 
said. "There are so many levels that we see 
on the surface right now that people do not 
see what it was back in the day." 

Despite low attendance, panel mem- 
bers said the discussion was successful. 



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4 The Echo 



News 



February 26. 2003 



Film production at CLU 



By Heather Ladwig 
Staff Writer 



This semester there will be a profes- 
sional, 35 mm film production taking 
place on campus at California Lutheran 
University. The director, Jordan Albertsen, 
and the producer, Brian Robinson, will be 
filming "Spoonaur" on campus during the 
weekends of March 7 and 14. 

Robinson has been in contact with sev- 
eral people on campus, including the head 
of the drama department Ken Gardner. 

"I am currently teaching an acting for 
communication class and this film is great 
hands-on acting and film shooting experi- 



ence for the students," Gardner said. There 
has also been several of Gardner's students 
cast in some of the background scenes of 
the film, as well as freshman Suvi Ch- 
isholm, who has been cast to play a rather 
small role in the film. 

This is not the first professional film to 
be produced on campus. About 10 years 
prior, there was another short film by the 
name of "Mike's Murder" filmed in the 
Little Theatre and every year there are sev- 
eral student films produced on campus. 

Robinson said the film is an "ex- 
tremely professional production about 
a high school student who is having the 
worst day of his life." Ryan Spoonaur, the 
main character in the movie, is an average 



16-year-old boy, with a car and a girlfriend, 
who has a very bad day at school that just 
gets worse and worse. 

The actual length of the film will only 
be about 15 minutes and will cost approxi- 
mately $20,000 to produce. 

Throughout the film production Al- 
bertsen and Robinson are planning on 
utilizing the cafeteria, a classroom in the F 
building, the gymnasium, the gazebo and a 
few other places around campus. 

"CLU is the perfect place for this film 
because it is far enough away from the hus- 
tle and bustle of Los Angeles, so we don't 
have to deal with all of the craziness down 
there.. .and it is also a small campus with a 
high school appeal to it," said Robinson. 



The university is requiring a $1,000 
deposit provided that no damages occur 
on campus. Robinson and Albertsen will 
also be using the campus security guards to 
make sure that there are no problems and 
everything goes smoothly throughout the 
film production. 

"The production is a student-based 
film that will be beneficial to not only 
the multi-media program and the drama 
department, but all students at CLU," said 
Vanessa Webster-Smith, manager of con- 
ferences and events at CLU. 

Robinson is still in need of extras for 
the film and would like students interested 
in participating to contact him at 818-693- 
6947. 



Females top males in battle of sexes 



By Mark Glesne 
Staff Writer 



Hundreds of California Lutheran Uni- 
versity students watched 10 teams of their 
peers fight for one large sum of money in 
the Battle of the Sexes. 

Sponsored by the CLU RHA and 
Cheesecake Factory, students battled 
through four rounds of games for a $1,000 
gift certificate, Tuesday, Feb. 1 1 . 

"We made the gift certificate for the 
Oaks Mall," said senior Daphne Simonson 
of the winning team. "It was too hard to 
choose one place for all of us to use it." 

Hosted by ASCLU President Nicole 
Hackbarth and fellow senior Travis Hen- 
derson, five teams of males and four teams 
of females were eliminated to leave one 
female team victorious. All spectators 
received free cheesecake and handouts of 



proper condom usage for CLU Sexual Re- 
sponsibility Week. 

"It was alright," junior Karen Thomp- 
son said. "It was suppose to be a sexual 
responsibility program, but what was the 
point? I just don't know what they were 
trying to teach us." 

The first round was called the "Con- 
dom Olympics" where teams competed in 
four different games. Two students placing 
a condom over a third students' head and 
blowing it up was the outcome of the first 
game. 

The second game involved one team 
member from each team having to place 
a condom over a cucumber with out us- 
ing one's hands. Next came a game that 
involved teammates using a condom as 
a slingshot to propel candy as far as pos- 
sible. 

The final game of the first round saw 



the whole team using condoms filled with 
water in a game of "Over Under." 

Upon the completion of the first round, 
two male teams and two female teams were 
eliminated. The second round consisted of 
each member of the six remaining teams 
being asked a question about the opposite 
sex. 

If they answered incorrectly, the op- 
posing team could steal and gain more 
points. Two more teams, one male and one 
female, were eliminated. 

"I think the guys got screwed," said 
sophomore Dominic Storelli of the last 
team eliminated. "It seemed like the girls 
got a way better chance at knowing and 
answering the questions. Like on the 'hot- 
test celebrity' question. There's no way the 
guys could get ours without a strike. The 
girls got all theirs without a strike." 

Round three was a relay game. The 



four teams raced against the clock to put 
on nylons, boxers, a bra and a tie the fast- 
est. The two slowest teams were eliminated 
from the game, leaving the final two teams 
for competition against one another. 

The fourth and final round pitted a 
team of each sex in a game of CLU Feud. 
Similar to the television show "Family 
Feud," team members had to answer ques- 
tions with results polled from one hundred 
students. 

The female team of junior Emily Pe- 
ters, seniors Daphne Simonson, Amanda 
Fraiser, JJ Grey, Tia Cochran, Katie 
Bashaw, Erin Neuhaus and Shannon Sav- 
age won the grand prize of $ 1 ,000. 

"I thought the [Battle of the Sexes] was 
really fun," Simonson said. "Some of the 
questions were challenging. I'm surprised 
they allowed some of them to be asked. 
Plus, to beat the boys was wonderful." 



En Fuego wins "Lu 
Idol" lip-sync contest 



By Jessica Laufman 
Staff Writer 



A lip-sync spin off of the popular Fox 
show "American Idol" — "Lu Idol" was 
the game show theme for last Friday's 
Club Lu event held in the gym. 

The event was hosted by freshmen Liz 
Rockstroh and Michael Falcone, and the 
judges included Professor Anne Green, 
Vanessa Webster-Smith from Conferences 
and Events and Professor Jorge Garcia. 

Like the television show, contestants 
faced the scrutiny of critical, yet humor- 
ous, commentary from the judges. Contes- 
tants were competing to win the first-place 
prize of $350. 

The evening started off with a solo 
performance of "Idiot Boyfriend" by 
freshmen Joe Decker. The crowd ap- 
plauded Decker for his dance move called 
"the dinosaur." Sophomore Kevin Andreen 
performed a rendition of the Tenacious D 
song "Tribute." 

"[Tenacious D] is my idol, but the 
performance was just too serious," Garcia 
said. 



The performance tied Andreen for first 
place with the musical medley by the group 
En Fuego, composed of students Casey 
Stanton. Seth Blundell, Jules Neale. CJ 
Kridner and Chris Hauser. En Fuego was 
pronounced the winner of the evening's 
competition based on the audience's ap- 
plause to break the tie. 

En Fuego performed a compilation of 
songs from many genres a few included 
Christina Aguilera's song "Dirty," "Care 
Bears Countdown" and "Escape" by En- 
rique Iglesias. 

"We tried to take something from 
everyone's personality when selecting the 
music," Kridner said. 

"It was full of silliness, and I had a 
lot of fun hanging out with my friends," 
Stanton said. 

Other highlights of the night included 
group recreations of the soundtrack hit 
"Moulin Rouge" and a fragmented Nsync/ 
Andrew W. K. performance. Also featured 
was an a cappella version of the Beach Boy 
song "Barbra Ann" by the Kingsmen Quar- 
tet, and a Vanessa Carlton song performed 
by Rockstroh. 



Student Life Appreciates CL(J R.A.: 




NATIONAL RA APPRECIATION WEEK 2003 



Check out the 

Echo on the Internet at 

www.clunet.edu/echo 



Thanks to the 
Marriott staff 
for moving breakfast 
. back to the caf ! 



February 26, 2003 



Features 



The Echo 5 



Women's Resource Center moves 



B*y Leah Sanchez 
Staff writer 



The rain stopped on Thursday, Feb. 
13, just in time for the grand opening that 
took place from 12 to 2 p.m. to celebrate 
the new home of the Women's Resource 
Center in the E building on California Lu- 
theran University's campus. 

The grand-opening kicked oft with a 
ribbon cutting ceremony with president of 
CLU, Luther Luedtke, and Dr. Kateri Al- 
exander, director of the Women's Resource 
Center, cutting the ribbon. 

"It turned out wonderfully," Alexander 
said. "Lots of people attended and Pastor 
Scott gave us a beautiful blessing." 

After the ribbon cutting ceremony 
guests were invited to go inside where 
food was provided and several prizes were 
given away. Some of the prizes included 
free gym passes, a lunch at the Centrum for 
two and a Fuji camera. 

The Women's Resource Center was 
previously located in Kramer Court, but 
Alexander thought it would be a smart 
decision to move to the E building. 

"It's an excellent location," Alexander 
said. 

The building was completely remod- 
eled with new carpet and a clean ceiling. 
Alexander said she opted to not serve 
punch because she did not want stains on 
her brand-new carpet. 

"It is absolutely wonderful," said Dr. 
Susan Corey, professor of English. "It is a 
very attractive building." 

The Women's Resource Center offers 
a wide range of resources for CLU stu- 
dents as well as the public. Some of these 
resources include programs such as Cre- 



ative Options: A Day for Women, which is 
a workshop for women that will take place 
on March I , and Women in the Arts, which 
will take place in April and include presen- 
tations, discussions and exhibits. 

The Women's Resource Center pro- 
vides the Brown Bag lecture series, which 
takes place every Tuesday at noon and 
feature a variety of topics. The center also 
has a library of books on women's issues, 
re-entry student services and houses the 
student women's club, Women's Issues, 
Women's Actions, which meets weekly. 
Also, new mothers are welcome to come 
and nurse their babies openly at the cen- 
ter. 

"We offer so many resources that once 
you find us you will mostly likely come 
back," Alexander said. 

The resource center caters primarily 
to women, but that doesn't mean that men 
aren't welcome. 

"Usually the only time men come to 
us for assistance is when they are wonder- 
ing what restaurant to take their girlfriend 
for Valentine's Day," Alexander said, "but 
sometimes they come to find out where 
their girlfriends can go to get counseling 
for various problems." 

On top of everything else, the Wom- 
en's Resource Center offers a quiet place 
to get away from campus chaos. Couches 
are set up so students can study or just take 
a few minutes to collect their thoughts. 

Female CLU students such as senior, 
Lisa Trueblood feel very fortunate to have 
such a facility provided for them. 

"1 think it's wonderful to have a place 
where women can go and get pretty much 
any kind of help that they need," True- 
blood said. 




Photograph courtesy of Scott Gaspermo 
The Women s Resource Center creates a cozy amosphere for visiting students. 




The new Women s Resource Center is located in the E building. 



Club profile: Campus Freethinkers 



By Cameron Brown 

Staff writer 



The Campus Freethinkers plans to in- 
corporate a diversified set of topics aimed 
at challenging students to express them- 
selves in a freethinking context. 

"This new organization is intended to 
provide students with an outlet from out- 
side the world," said Randy Ho, a student 
member of the new society. "We do not 
incorporate religion into the discussions; 
rather, we attempt to tackle such topics as 
creationism and evolution." 

The organization's intent is to appeal 
to students who yearn to speak about the 
world and its controversial topics without 
the fear of being harassed or criticized. me facu,t y adviser " 



Not a club that feeds off of popular de- 
mand or ratings, it provides a forum for 
those who are interested in discussions 
revolved around humanitarian and skeptic 
thought. 

At the end of the fall semester, senior 
Bryan Daniels teamed up with biology 
professor Dr. David Marcey to establish 
the organization. 

"I approached Dr. Marcey about being 
part of a new society that would create an 
original channel for students who wanted 
to venture onward with their thoughts, but 
without being condemned for doing so," 
said Daniels, president of Campus Free- 
thinkers. "He liked the idea and agreed to 
help organize the institute and take part as 



According to Daniels, Marcey has 
contributed largely to the rapid progres- 
sion of the organization and will continue 
to participate and support the actions of the 
association. 

On Friday, Feb. 14, the organization 
inaugurated the club by holding its first 
congregation at the Richter Hall. The event 
included a pizza dinner at the expense of 
the club and a movie was shown to help in- 
troduce the attendees to the basic structure 
and intent of the society. 

"1 enjoyed the movie to a great extent 
and so did the students who went to the 
meeting. The only disappointing aspect of 
the evening was the low attendance," Ho 
said. "Despite the low attendance, I am not 



Day. The next meeting, I am positive that 
more students will attend." 

Even though there are no concrete 
meetings posted on the calendar for the 
Campus Freethinkers, Daniels said that 
in the coming weekends, the organization 
will attend a conference at Cal Tech Uni- 
versity. 

The organization hopes to meet a mini- 
mum of two times a week — location not 
specified — and plans to schedule a variety 
of speakers and guests. 

"I know we are a new organization 
whose crowd is rather trivial," Daniels 
said. "However, I think there are enough 
people who are interested. With that in 
mind, I am confident that the Campus 



too disappointed. I mean, it was Valentine's Freethinkers will succeed." 



Morning Glory continues in excellence 



By Christian Coleman 
Staff writer" 



and literary art. On the visual side, color literary submissions and help design the the end of April and is distributed at no 



The Morning Glory magazine, cre- 
ated in 1971 by Dr. Jack Ledbetter, 
continues to this day showcasing the best 
creative endeavors of the students, fac- 
ulty, staff and alumni of California Lu- 
theran University. The Morning Glory 
has received various awards throughout 
its existence. It is an ACP All-American/ 
Pacemaker award-winner and part of 
the Associated Collegiate Press Hall of 
Fame. The magazine consists of visual 



and black and white photographs, photos 
of sculptures and paintings can be found 
within its pages. On the literary side, 
vignettes, poetry and personal essays are 
interspersed throughout the magazine. 

Zac Ryder, editor in chief for the 
Morning Glory and CLU senior, is in 
charge of the final layout and composi- 
tion for the magazine. Nicole Biergiel, 
a junior English major at CLU, is the as- 
sistant editor for the Morning Glory. Her 
primary duty is to judge student art and 



page layout. 

"The main purpose for Morning 
Glory is to give students a forum to dis- 
play their talent in writing and fine arts, 
and the staff of the Morning Glory wants 
the CLU community to enjoy the tal- 
ent the school's students have to offer," 
Biergiel said. "As long as the school 
lasts, the Morning Glory will continue 
to live on." Most of the funding for the 
magazine comes from the English de- 
partment. The magazine is published at 



cost to the reader. One thousand copies 
are made for the CLU community. 

Christine Smith is a CLU student 
majoring in history and political sci- 
ence. 

"The magazine is a good example of 
exceptional student work that the CLU 
community can be proud of." Smith 
said. 

"This magazine gives a very per- 
sonal glimpse into other peoples lives," 
said junior Marina Julius. 



6 The Echo 



Features 



FEBRUARY 26, 2003 



Campus Quotes 



What should CLU try to improve? 




Annika Gustafson. class of 2004, business Bob Grantz, class of2003, communication major Coreen Oshiro, class of 2004, psychology Tim Harding, class of 2004, math/computer 
marketing major major science major 

"I would like to be able to park anywhere near 
"I would like to see a better fitness center." my dorm." "More variety in the meal plan." "Classes need to be aimed higher than a 

sixth-grade level." 




Mark Achenbach, class of 2004, business 
administration major 

"An effective drainage system would be nice for 
when it rains, so we don't have to swim across 
campus." 



Kellie Kocher, class of 2005, biochemistry 
major 

"CLU needs to handle rain better. There 
are leaks in classrooms and puddles every- 
where when it does rain." 



Brent Baier, class of 2003, biology major 

"Improvements on campus need to begin with 
a complete overhaul of our sports facilities. 
Secondly, drainage on Luther St needs to be 
revamped so as to prevent students from having 
to build an ark to cross it Thirdly, living life in 
perpetual darkness on campus is rather bother- 



Cristie Trippeda, class of 2005, history 
major 

"I wish they would have good things for 
every meal and not just all on one day." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jon Gonzales 



puzz130 



1 


2 


3 




' 


S 


8 


7 


1 


D 


9 


10 


11 


12 






13 










14 






IS 






16 




20 


17 






" 


25 


Z 

26 


■ 

27 




19 






21 






22 


23 i 








24 




26 


i J 9M -'-■ 




30 


31 




32 








S3 




34 






35 






40 




36 






37 






39 


" 






41 




42 








43 






44 




4S 


46 \ 




■ I 




48 I HII' 3 








SO 


61 


"L 






S3 




S4 






55 


38 


67 




1 






H 


1 Heo 






61 




I" 








am 63 







ACROSS 


49 Wise 


22 Looked older 


1 Man lacking manners 


50 Large waterfall 


23 Idol 




54 Of the sun 


25 Edge 


9 lota 


57 Whitney 


26 Adult insect 


12 Baba 


58 Tropical fruit tree 


27 Poison 


1 3 Proverb 


60 Attempt 


30 Propel a boat 


14 Age 

15 Pertains to punishment 


61 Every 


31 Wants 


62 Vegetable 


34 One-thousandth of an inch 


1 7 Seed sower 


63 Look 




19 Straight line around which a body rotates 




40 Motive 


21 Rock group 


DOWN 


43 Texas fort 




1 Hat 


45 Once 




2 Beer 


46 Gauls 




3 Gold coin (Iraq) 


46 Outer cereal coating 


29 Work for pay 


4 Spite 


50 Education group (abbr ) 


32 Large passenger car {slang) 


5 Ego 

6 Snooze 


52 Trouble; feel unwell 


35 Fish eggs 

36 The most (slang) 


7 Stare 
6 Kingdom 


53 Blackbird 
55 Is (plural) 


37 Zeus' shield (var) 


9 Propelled plane 




39 Pitcher; jug 


10 Mineral 


59 Leave 


41 Armed forces veteran 


1 1 Pave 




42 4th Greek letter 


1 6 Tool for splitting wood 




44 Assists minister 


18 Christmas carol 




47 Priestly garment 


20 Look 





February 26, 2003 



Arts 



The Echo 7 



CLU choir prepares for Brant 
concert and upcoming choir tour 



By Cameron Brown 
Staff writer 



The California Lutheran Univer- 
sity choir stands proud in dark purple 
gowns and black shoes. As they sing, 
their voices lift high to the ceiling of the 
Samuelson Chapel. 

"The practices are fun; sometimes 
difficult. Nevertheless, I love to sing, es- 
pecially when the choir is performing in 
concert. "said freshman Matthew White. 
"The feeling is amazing and the adrena- 
line rush is even more of a thrill. To look 
out and see a vast amount of people all 
staring in your direction is definitely 
spectacular." 



Monday through Thursday, the CLU 
choir practices in Overton Hall prepar- 
ing for upcoming events. 

"The practices aren't as physically 
demanding as they are mentally," White 
said. 

The choir practices five hours a 
week. When a large event approaches, 
such as the upcoming choir tour that be- 
gins March 2 1 , the choir works until the 
songs are performed with perfection. 

Practicing can be strenuous; aside 
from the general workouts, the choir 
takes home its works in progress. 

Presently, the choir is working on 
singing Psalms 22 and 43, but in Ger- 
man. However, singing in German is 



nothing new for the CLU choir. Last 
year, they devoted the entire spring 
semester to learning and performing 
Bach's "St. John's Passion." 

"The choir has had to take on vari- 
ous challenges concerning the songs that 
they sing. Since we are a choir, we sing 
in all the Romance languages; German, 
Latin, French and English," said Dr. 
Wyant Morton, instructor and associate 
professor of Music at CLU. 

"Once the pieces are done, we will 
be ready for our tour that will start to- 
wards the latter part of March," Morton 
said. 

The tour will take the choir on a road 
trip through the southwestern states, in- 



cluding parts of California, Arizona and 
a short stay in Las Vegas. 

Following the tour, both the CLU 
choir and the Women's Chorale will 
perform in the Henry Brant concert in 
recognition of Pulitzer Prize winner, 
Henry Brant. At the concert. Brant will 
be conducting two pieces of his award- 
winning work. 

"The event is a mark of the success 
that the choir have had over the last few 
years. I am very pleased with the pro- 
gression of the choir, here at CLU, The 
choir has come a long way and it is only 
going to get better and better as time 
goes on," Morton said. 



Literary society: Sigma Tau Delta 



By Christian Coleman 
Stakf writer 



Of Sigma Tau Delta, the Interna- 
tional English Honor Society, Alpha Eta 
Gamma, CLU's chapter, will be attending 
the national convention sponsored by the 
honor society on March 20-23, 2003, at the 
Hyatt Regency in Cincinnati, Ohio. At this 
convention, some of the brightest English 
students from across the United States will 
be judged on their literary works. These 
works consist of personal essays, poetry, 
short fiction and analytical essays. 

Eleven CLU English students' submis- 
sions were accepted by the society. Un- 



fortunately, only six out of the 1 1 students 
will be going to Cincinnati. The students 
who are traveling had to come up with their 
own funding for the trip; the rest could not 
afford to go. 

"Once the students reach the conven- 
tion, they are scheduled to present and read 
their essays to members of the audience," 
said Alexandra McConnell, Alpha Eta 
Gamma chapter president. 

"The purpose of this organization is 
to bestow distinction to English students 
of high caliber and merit. One nice thing 
about the Sigma Tau Delta convention is 
that whether a submitted work is accepted 
or not, the judges always take the time to 



offer the writer constructive criticism," 
said Dr. Bruce Stevenson, English profes- 
sor and adviser to the CLU chapter. 

Sigma Tau Delta has two orientations: 
one academic in nature, the other com- 
munity service-oriented. The new mission 
for each of its constituent chapters is to en- 
courage English majors from all over the 
nation to actively participate in community 
service projects. 

The CLU chapter just recently con- 
ducted its own community service event 
on Feb. 7. The members went to Oak Tree 
Learning Center in Palmdale, a school 
for underprivileged children, and held a 
creative writing contest for the children. 



At the school, the children were awarded 
a pizza party and each of the 55 children 
who submitted essays received a custom- 
ized certificate as a token of appreciation. 

"Every member in the chapter bonded 
together to help out in this community 
service project and as a graduating senior, 
I would like to see the younger recruits 
promote literacy skills to younger kids," 
McConnell said. 

The mission to encourage students to 
take it upon themselves to help the com- 
munity seems to be working. 

"There was little to no direction on my 
part; they handled this community project 
all by themselves," Stevenson said. 



Harmony Week events: 

Wednesday Feb. 26-Blue Jeans Day 

Please wear a pair of blue jeans to show your support for Lesbian 
Gay Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) rights. There will also be jeans 
hanging between the trees along Memorial Parkway. Each pair will have 
the name of someone who has been the victim of hate crimes against 
LGBT people. 
Thursday Feb. 27-Ally Day 
We will have buttons available in the SUB for you to show that you 
are an ally and a supporter of the LGBT Rights Movement. Also, a gay 
performer will be playing at the NEED Thursday night. 
Friday Feb. 28-BiScream Social 
Please join us for ice cream, a movie, and good conversation in the 
Apartments Lounge at 6 p.m. 



Interactive Arts Festival 2003 

April 6-14, 2003 

An interactive showcase of multimedia related works. Organized by 

the Multimedia department at CLU with the collaboration of Music, 

Biology, Art, etc. CLU students and faculty will display their work. 

The festival is also scheduling a working panel with new media artists, 

curators and scholars. 
Works accepted: 

Sound installation 

Video installation 

Digital photographs 

Digital prints 



Web online works 
Streaming video & sound 
Interactive performance 
Interactive presentation (kiosk) 



Submission Deadline: Monday, March 10 

Submissions accepted by Randy in the Humanities office. 



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Day Camps seek Summer Staff 

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Don't 
forget 
Club 
Lu this 
Friday! 



8 The Echo 



Opinion 



Febraury 26, 2003 



CZ5 

o 



fc 



O 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

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Letters to the editor 

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Letters are subject to editing 
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on the following dates: 

April 2. 2003 
April 23, 2003 
May 14, 2003 



Reality shows: really entertaining? 




By Michele Hatler 
Editor in chief 



Most Tuesday evenings at 10 p.m. I 
can be found watching the "Real World." 
The show is ongoing and the casts and 
scenes change with the seasons. I consider 
MTV the originator of reality television. 
However, now that reality television has 
become popular, it is getting out of hand. 

Prime time used to consist of sitcoms 
and fabricated shows. Growing up, shows 



like "Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" were on in 
the evenings. Now sitcoms aren't as popu- 
lar, and reality television shows consume 
prime time television. The first "Survivor" 
that was revealed got ratings that the tele- 
vision industry saw as a successful hit. But 
after that, things went down the drain. 

Shows have been produced about 
couples thrown on an island to see if they 
break up, and others show how a group 
of people are crammed in a house to live 
together for one reason or another. People 
have been put in haunted houses, asked 
to do daring stunts and others are told to 
find the spouse of their dreams after three 
weeks. Unfortunately, some of the shows 
that are being produced are so inane and 
unintelligent that it is getting sad that the 
attention of television -viewing Americans 
is actually kept entertained. 

The fact that it costs a considerably 
smaller amount of money to make a re- 
ality television show than an episode of 
"Friends" keeps production companies 



happy. No actors have to be paid and the 
ratings are high. 

But there are no standards anymore. 
Everything is being exposed and it is 
demeaning to think that this is the most 
popular way to entertain viewers. 

I admit I watch reality television. I 
also think that the first few shows were 
innovative. How far can these shows go, 
though? The reality is that these shows air 
on prime time and usually end up in a mess 
afterward. Is it really worth it to people to 
expose themselves on television ? 




Letter to the Editor 



One of the most instructive lessons I 
learned in my religion classes here at CLU 
was that in order for the Bible to make 
any sense (if it does so at all), it is to be 
understood as largely a book of theology. 
This way of reading Christian scripture is 
refreshing, since it frees one from walking 
on eggshells about the purity of revelation, 
and allows the reader to clearly understand 
the unstated biases and assumptions of the 
original writers — and, especially, those as- 
pects of Scripture which, though important 
parts of the history of ideas, are no longer 
relevant. 

Two of the largest assumptions made 
in the Bible (both since rendered obsolete) 
appear in the very first book. Culprit No. I 
occurs in Genesis 1 :26: "And God said, Let 
us make man in our image, after our like- 
ness: and let them have dominion over the 
fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, 
and over the cattle, and over all the earth, 
and over every creeping thing that creepeth 
upon the earth." Culprit No. 2 occurs a few 
chapters later, in chapter 9:1 1: "And I will 
establish my covenant with you, neither 
shall all flesh be cut off any more by the 
waters of a flood; neither shall there any 
more be a flood to destroy the earth." Thus, 
we have two key assumptions — that the 



human being, having the unique faculties 
of self-awareness, memory, cogitation and 
imagination we possess, must be similar in 
degree or kind to that which created the 
cosmos; also, the assumption- that cata- 
clysmic events in our world's past will not 
repeat themselves and nearly destroy our 
race. 

Due to what we know from modern 
science, both of these assumptions are in- 
complete at best, dangerously inaccurate at 
worst. If evolution has taught us anything, 
it is that faith in humanity — either as a 
divine creation or in innate heroic poten- 
tial — is grossly overrated. Where once it 
was held that human beings were a little 
lower than angels, yet above beasts, we 
now know better. To claim that we are a 
special creation in God's image is to treat 
the fossil record of Homo erectus, Homo 
habilis. Homo sapiens and Cro-Magnons 
as nothing more than embarrassing skel- 
etons in the closet, when in fact they are 
our distant ancestors. More than that, if we 
took faith in a deity seriously, it would be 
the height of insolence and insult to insist 
we are made in His image — consider- 
ing the bloody 5,000- year history of this 
murderous hairless talking ape, one would 
certainly hope God would not be like us. 

Even more damning, however, is the 



assumption that the last environmental 
cataclysm (represented by the Flood) was 
the final instance of such an occurrence, 
and that humanity will be spared Nature's 
wrath as promised by God. If anything, 
our species should be quivering in fear 
before creation right now, rather than its 
creator. Many of the environmental woes 
in the last century or two have been of our 
own making. Oil spills, global warming, 
wearing out soil due to monocrop excess, 
erosion. ..nature is capricious, but when it 
fights back, it does so in unexpected and 
sometimes terrifying ways. Acting like 
these are occurrences that don't matter to 
God's chosen is the height of human folly. 
A controversial hypothesis has been 
advanced by some anthropologists— that 
human beings, throughout history, have 
managed to collectively convince them- 
selves of their immutability and special 
spiritual character (separated from the 
rest of nature) as an evolutionary strategy 
to hide the truth, which is far more threat- 
ening. The hypothesis is simply this: our 
attempts to frame God in our own image 
are for our species* own edification and 
proliferation, not God's. If it is true, this 
strategy has been highly useful throughout 
human history, but may well come back to 
Please see ARTICLE, p. 9 



The 



Echo Staff 



Michele Hatler 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/ 
Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 

Business Manager 

Brett Rowland 

News Editor 

Karen Peterson 
Arts & Features Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Opinon Editor 



Katie Bashaw 
Sports Editor 

Scott Gasperino 
Photo Editor 

Eric Ingemunson 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Heather Molloy 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dm Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Editorial Mailer: The staff of The Echo welcomes 
on its articles as well as on the newspaper itself However, the 
staff acknowledges that opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Fx:ho reserves the right to edit all stories, 
—editorials, letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Advertising Mailer: Except as clearly implied by the advertis- 
ing party of otherwise specifically stated, advertisements in The 
Echo arc inserted by commercial activities or ventures identi- 
fied in the advertisements themselves and not by California 
Lutheran University Advertising material printed herein is 
solely for informational purposes Such printing is not to be 
construed as a written and implied sponsorship, endorsement. 
or investigation of such commercial enterprises or ventures 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 



Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief. The Echo. California Lutheran Univer- 
sity. 60 West Olsen Road. Thousand Oaks. CA 91360-2787. 
Telephone: (805) 493-3465; Fax: (805) 493-3327; E-mail 
ccho@clunel.edu. 



February 26, 2003 



Opinion 



The Echo 9 



haunt us. In casting God in the role of a masculine benevolence with a human heart 
and personhood, we may be playing a very dangerous game — to delude ourselves that 
we have an ace in the hole when it comes to the universe. This dangerous game is 
not limited to the various worldwide expressions of Christianity either, or to religion 
in general. People and powers both sacred and secular play this game and make this 
devil's bargain. 

The archetypal mythic truth advanced by so many cultures since the dawn of his- 
tory has been, when human beings grow too much in their hubris, reality itself will 
eventually win. Time, death, decay, change and novelty have brought low many species 
and many empires before those of humanity; they will do so again. If God does exist, 



then we must face up to the rather uncomfortable fact that we are not the pinnacle of 
God's creation, nor are we more important than other forms of life. Nor should we be, 
I would argue. Surveying our past century with all its human foibles convinces me all 
the more that the ever-changing universe around us, given evolution and enough time, 
can certainly do better. 

Adam Martin 
History/Political Science 
Class of 2003 



Staff Editorials 



By their blood you shall know them 



By Adam Martin 
Columnist 



The ancient patristic apologist Tertul- 
lian once wrote, "the blood of Christians 
is seed (of the church)." Much as this is a 
phrase and a viewpoint that makes people 
squeamish today, it is actually not one 
limited to talk of Christianity. There is a 
popular song which contains the following 
lines: "And I'm proud to be an American/ 
Where at least I know I'm free/And 1 won't 
forget the men who died/Who gave that 
right to me." What is similar about these 
sentiments? They use a common currency 
of legitimacy: blood. 

Blood has an interesting history in 
human affairs; once it was held to be the 
pseudo-magical source of life itself. At 
various other times (and still today) blood- 
as-kinship pedigree means the difference 
between the powerful and the powerless; 
life and death. However, few appeals to 
blood hold a more mesmerizing effect 
than those of blood-as-sanctification. Be- 
cause the blood of loyal followers of a 
party/nation/company/church (pick one) 
has been shed, this party/nation/company/ 
church commands your loyalty. In a nation 



we call such people "patriots." If it was a 
company, we call them "dedicated to the 
job above and beyond the call of duty." If 
it was a political party we could call them 
"casualties of war." If it was a church or 
religious group, we could call them "mar- 
tyrs." All the original Twelve Apostles and 
St. Paul and St. James the Just were "mar- 
tyrs." In the U.S. realm, we could call the 
nearly 3,000 people who died on the 1 1th 
of September 2001 "martyrs." 

Martyrdom is a very tricky enterprise, 
as any political scientist or historian of reli- 
gion will tell you. All too often, people who 
truly would deserve a saint's remembrance 
receive only historical silence, while lavish 
hagiographies adom the historical record 
for men who butchered thousands. 

Some martyrdoms trigger major splits 
in political and religious organizations that, 
in retrospect, seem strange reasons to start 
a new denomination, Husayn, descendant 
of Ali (son-in-law of the Prophet Muham- 
mad, founder of Islam) was defeated and 
killed by the forces of his rival Zayd at 
Karbala (present- day Iraq) in a bid for the 
caliphate; on the surface, this seems like a 
contest for power. Muslim factions broke 
away, however, viewing Husayn as a mar- 



tyr; they now form the collection of groups 
identified as "Shi'a" Islam, with a distinct 
theology of their own— and a historic ri- 
valry with Sunni Muslims that continues to 
dominate and complicate social issues in 
the Middle East. 

If you are unlucky enough to die for a 
cause you didn't even know you were fight- 
ing for, your memory could very easily be 
used in ways you never intended while you 
were alive — the U.S. sailors who died on 
the U.S.S. Maine in Havana in 1898 come 
to mind. What was likely an internal explo- 
sion due to boiler problems was claimed as 
a Spanish mine, giving the U.S. a credible 
pretext to launch the Spanish-American 
War. U.S. troops and sailors gleefully 
cried "Remember the Maine!" as they took 
Cuba, Guam and the Philippines. What it 
was they actually remembered about the 
Maine is not clear, but the memory of mar- 
tyrs, whether true or not, was good enough 
for the purpose at hand. 

This is not to say that all claims of 
war crimes or human rights atrocities or 
persecutions are only political ploys; far 
from it. However, each and every group to 
which we belong has its own set of "mar- 
tyrs" of one fashion or another. Careful ex- 



amination of these claims is in order. Some 
truly were saints who died martyrs' deaths. 
Others were patsies who were apparently 
worth more in death as martyrs than they 
were alive. How can we know the differ- 
ence? To put a new spin on a Scriptural 
phrase, "by their blood you shall know 
them." Measure the martyr; measure the 
cause; measure the circumstances. Did this 
person, so to speak, "walk the talk"? And if 
they didn't, why? 

If this seems disrespectful to the dead 
(no matter whose dead), I assure you that it 
is not. Few things are more closely guarded 
and cherished in this world than how we 
are remembered after death. However, we 
do both our dead and ourselves a disservice 
if we do not attempt to view them — and 
ourselves — in the clearest possible light, 
omitting no merits and excusing no faults. 
Time can be a harsh mirror, one whose 
reflection the human being often avoids. 
If the dead — especially our martyrs — con- 
tinue to play such a tremendous role in our 
lives, perhaps it would be best to uncover 
those things truly worthy of life beyond the 
grave, and consign false memories them- 
selves to a much-deserved death. 



Guns: who really has control? 



By Josh Simmons 
Staff Writer 



To own a gun is the right of every American who is 
18 or older and has not been convicted of a felony. How- 
ever, slowly over the years, our right to bear arms is being 
infringed upon. I can justify wanting to eliminate assault 
rifles and other excessively lethal guns, but the right to 
own rifles to hunt and pistols to protect one's self is an 



area which should not be infringed upon. According to 
the Michigan Daily: "while incidents such as Columbine 
are indeed tragic, they are not preventable by the banning 
of weapons. The weapons that were used in this incident 
were obtained illegally, as are over 75 percent of guns used 
in crimes. Criminals will have guns no matter what the 
law." 

How would the idea of registering or licensing guns 
effect the over 75 percent of crimes in which the guns were 
obtained illegally? 



According to James B. Jacobs, author of "Can Gun 
Control Work?". "The 1990s' epic decreases in crime — 
along with the preceding decades' increases — had little to 
do with guns and suggests that policymakers could better 
direct their energy and attention elsewhere." 

I would agree with Mr. Jacobs; we have much more 
pressing matters in our country right now, and the best way 
to stop the illegal use of guns is by catching criminals. 

Questions or comments? jsimmon@clunet.edu 



Look for the Echo online 
www.clunet.edu/echo 






■ 






10 The Echo 



Sports 



February 26. 2003 



Regals stay undefeated, Golf team 
Men's tennis drops one 



By Victor Esquer 
Staff Writer 



The men's tennis team continued its 
winning ways with dominating victories 
over Whittier and Occidental this past 
week, but was brought back to earth after a 
tough loss against Claremont. 

The women's tennis team stayed hot 
this past week with three big wins against 
Whittier, Occidental and Claremont. 
Kingsmen vs. Whittier 

Whittier had no idea what hit them as 
the Kingsmen romped the Poets, 7-0. They 
swept all six singles matches and all three 
doubles matches. 

At No.l singles, Jeremy Quinlan 
fought back and defeated Nick Julia (4-6, 
6-3, 6-2). Junya Hasebe and Sean Ruit- 
enberg had no problem in their matches 
sweeping their opponents, 6-0, 6-0. In the 
No.l doubles match. Quinlan and Ryan 
Felix won easily, 8-3. 
Kingsmen vs. Occidental 

After defeating Whittier. the Kings- 
men traveled to Occidental where they 
brought their A-game and proved to be too 
much for the Tigers, shutting them out and 
winning, 7-0. 

In the No.l singles match. Amir 
Marandy won easily (6-1, 6-1). He then 
teamed up with Felix to beat Brett Baker 



and Johnnie Munger, 8-5. All six of their 
singles matches were won in straight sets. 
With this victory, the Kingsmen now 
moved to 4-0 overall and 3-0 in conference 
play. 
Kingsmen vs. Claremont-Mudd-Scripps 

After shutting out Whittier and Oc- 
cidental, the Kingsmen finally were de- 
throned by Claremont as they suffered 
their first loss of the season, 5-2. Marandy 
was able to stay undefeated this season af- 
ter he won his No. 1 singles match against 
Ivan Yeh, 6-3, 2-6, 6-4. Quoc Ly and Ju- 
nya Hasebe both dropped their matches. 

"We are playing great tennis right 
now; we are all on the same page and do- 
ing what it takes to win. Unfortunately we 
lost to Claremont. but 1 know we'll bounce 
back", said Ruitenberg. 

The Kingsmen are now 4-1 overall 
and 3-1 in SCIAC; their next match is at 
La Verne on March 1 . 
Regals vs. Whittier 

Whittier didn't know what to do 
against the red-hot Regals after being de- 
feated, 8-1. They won all three doubles 
matches as they did last week against Red- 
lands. Reecca Hunau and Lisa Novajosky 
paired up to defeat Jessica Wilgus and Tif- 
faney Wilson in the No.l doubles match. 

The Regals also dominated the singles 
matches winning five of six. In the No. 2 



singles. Hunau had no problem with Anna 
Wheat, beating her 6-0, 6-0. 
Regals vs. Occidental 

The Regals. still hot from their win 
against Whittier, dismantled Occidental 
the same way defeating them, 8-1. Hunau 
and Novajosky won in the No.l doubles 
match. 8-5, against Rebecca Schumacher 
and Lori Judd of Occidental. The Regals 
won all three doubles matches once again 
for the third week in a row. 

The Regals only loss was in the No.4 
singles match. 
Regals vs. CMS 

The Regals then traveled to Claremont 
and managed to pull out a 6-3 victory to 
remain undefeated. Again, they won all 
their doubles matches for the fourth con- 
secutive game. Hunau and Novajosky 
were too much for Becca Dutton and Beth 
Ann Dipoli beating them, 8-5. Hunau also 
won her No. 2 singles match over Dinapoli. 
7-5, 6-2. Novajosky was able to pull out a 
victory by defeating Lauren Drew, 4-6, 6-4 
in the No.3 singles match. 

Hunau is very happy with the Regals' 
season start. 

"We are doing awesome right now, 
everyone is doing their part. The focus and 
positive attitude is there," said Hunau. 

The Regals, undefeated at 4-0, host 
LaVeme on March I. 



Softball enters conference play 2-1 
by winning series against Redlands 

By JotTn Botta "^ .„„„■„„ , -r, ,,, . c7 ., , , , „ 



By 

Staff Writer 

The Regals Softball team has struggled 
through pre-season games, but came out 
strong this week in its first conference 
match-up. 
CLU vs. Masters 

The Cal Lutheran University Softball 
team lost its first two home games of the 
season last Tuesday against Masters Col- 
lege. 

In the first game, Mustangs pitcher 
Kristen Neil was on fire, allowing only 
two hits and holding the Regals scoreless. 
Masters got on the scoreboard early, scor- 
ing a run in each of the first two innings. 
Despite a good performance from senior 
Christa Oalier who went two for three with 
a double, the Regals were not able to get 
much else going offensively. Regals pitch- 
er Olivia Chacon surrendered just two hits 
and one earned run but it was not enough. 
Masters took the first game 3-0. 

In game two, Cal Lutheran jumped 
out to an early lead in the first inning when 
Galier singled to left center bringing in 
junior Carrie Mitchell. Unfortunately for 
the Regals, it would be their only run of 
the game. Masters tied the game in the 
third and then took the lead in the fourth 



scoring two runs. The Mustangs then blew 
the game open in the seventh, scoring four 
runs and eventually walking away with 
the 7-0 win. The Mustangs had 1 1 hits, 
while Cal Lutheran struggled at the plate, 
producing only four. CLU starting pitcher 
senior Erin Neuhaus gave up three runs on 
eight hits through four innings. The Regals 
record fell to 0-4 while the Mustangs im- 
proved to 10-3. 
CLU vs. Redlands 

The Cal Lutheran Softball team got 
their first win of the season last Friday as 
they opened SCIAC play with a 2-0 victory 
over the University of Redlands. 

CLU scored both their runs in the 
third inning when "The Answer," Carrie 
Mitchell singled to left field, knocking in 
Amanda DeFusco and Neuhaus. 

The Regals held on to the win thanks 
to a brilliant pitching performance from 
freshman Gianna Regal, who pitched a 
complete game, striking out two, and hold- 
ing Redlands scoreless. Cal Lutheran im- 
proved their record to 1-4 overall and 1-0 
in SCIAC while the Bulldogs fell to 0-5. 

"We finally stepped up and now we're 
on the right track," Galier said after the 
game. "We've worked some things out and 
now we just need to keep it going." 

"It felt really, really, really good to get 



that first win out of the way," sophomore 
Heidi Miller says. "We're taking it one 
game at a time and today was a good indi- 
cation of what is coming." 

The Regals were be back in action on 
Saturday to face the Bulldogs in a double- 
header. 

"Every game to us right now is life 
or death," manager Debbie Day said. "We 
don't want to leave our future up to anyone 
else. We will control our own destiny." 

The Cal Lutheran Softball team split a 
doubleheader with Redlands last Saturday, 
losing 5-1 in the first game, then winning 
the second game 3-1. 

Game one remained scoreless until 
the fourth inning when the Bulldogs put 
their bats to work, scoring four runs. 
Mitchell's RBI single in the fifth was the 
only response the Regals could manage, as 
the Bulldogs held on to the win. Neuhaus 
pitched six innings for the Regals, giving 
up seven hits and two earned runs. 

In game two, it looked as though Red- 
lands was ready to pick up right where they 
left off, taking an early 1 -0 lead. However, 
the Regals somehow came up with three 
runs in the seventh inning, thanks to RBI 
singles from freshmen Gianna Regal and 
Erin LaFata. Chacon picked up the win 
giving up only one run in seven innings. 



Support your Kingsmen and Regal Basketball teams in their last home games of the season! 

Tonight, Feb. 26 @ 7:30 p.m. - Regals vs. Whittier 

Tomorrow, Feb. 27 @ 7:30 p.m. - Kingsmen vs. Claremont- Mudd-Scripps 

with seniors: Vic Esquer, Charlie Kundrat, Dave Seals, Noah Brooous, 'B' Garrett, Pat Holmberg 

*THE REGAL DANCERS WILL BE PERFORMING AT BOTH GAMES* 



struggles 
in early 
matches 



By Etienne Emanuel 
Staff Writer 



The Kingsmen golf team has strug- 
gled in the first few weeks of the season 
to get back to its previous stellar form, 
but early conference matches have been 
promising for the rest of the season. 

CLU at Redlands Best Ball Tourney 

The Kingsmen Men's Golf team 
began their season on Feb. 7, playing at 
the PGA. of Belmont in Redlands. The 
match featured seven of the eight schools 
in SCIAC. The Kingsmen finished fourth 
overall behind Claremont, La Verne, and 
last year's champion, Redlands, who shot 
an even par. 

Cal Lutheran was led by Jordan 
Silvertrust and Peder Nyhus. The pair 
finished second in the best ball match at 
7 1 , shooting one under par. 

"I think we played well considering 
the bad weather we faced and it was the 
first match of the year. We have a young 
team but we will continue to get better," 
said Silvertrust. 

CLU vs. La Verne 

In their second match, Feb. 10, Cal 
Lu faced La Veme at Sierra La Veme. 
The Kingsmen fell short to the Leopards 
shooting 318 while La Veme finished 
at 301. Freshman Peder Nyhus led the 
team shooting a 75, on the par-71 course. 
Adam Hollinger came in with 80 and 
Jason Poyser rounded out the top three 
Kingsmen with an 81. 

CLU vs. Redlands 

The Kingsmen once again trav- 
eled to Redlands for their third match 
of the season, playing at the Redlands 
Country Club. Cal Lu fell short against 
the Bulldogs, shooting 321 as a team on 
the par 70 course. Redlands finished with 
296. Silvertrust led the team with a 76, 
including a 34 on the back nine. Adam 
Hollinger and Jason Poyser tied for the 
team's second place with a score of 8 1 . 

CLU vs. Cal Tech 

Cal Lutheran played their first home 
match at Sterling Hills in Camarillo 
against Cal Tech. The Kingsmen shot 
a 307 while Cal Tech finished with 362 
giving Cal Lu their first SCIAC win. 

"It was nice to get our first win. We 
were pleased with our total score; hope- 
fully, we'll play well again at Occiden- 
tal," said Jason Poyser who finished with 
an 80 behind teammates Peder Nyhus 
(74), Matt Holland (76) and Jordan Sil- 
vertrust (77). 

High point for the Kingsmen was 
when Randy Cox hit a hole-in-one on the 
183-yard par-3 eighth hole. 

Up Next 

This week Cal Lu plays Occidental 
on Monday Feb. 24 and then faces Cla- 
remont on Tuesday March 4 at Sterling 
Hills. 



February 26, 2003 



Sports 



The Echo 11 



Regals basketball applies lessons 
learned each game to SCIAC play 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



Four losses, including one in overtime, 
over the last two weeks pulled the Regals 
basketball team to 3-9 in the conference. 
CLU vs. Claremont-Mudd-Scripps 

The Regals lost to the Claremont- 
Mudd-Scripps Athenas, 64-50, on Feb. 1 1 . 
Freshman Lauren Stroot led the team with 
1 8 points, followed by sophomore Brusta 
Brown who scored 15 points and junior 
Julie Cichon, who caught 10 rebounds. 
CLU vs. Pomona-Pitzer 

The team also fell in overtime to Po- 
mona-Pitzer Colleges, 91-81, on Feb. 14. 
Stroot recorded 15 points and freshman 
Alexandra Mallen posted 13 points, 10 as- 
sists and five steals. 

"I think we played hard, but we didn't 
give it our all and it shouldn't have gone 
into overtime," Cichon said. 



"It was a lot different, because four of 
our players fouled out," Stroot said. "It was 
also similar, because we have a tendency to 
take the lead. It's always been really close, 
because all the teams in our conference 
are really good and anyone can win the 
game." 

According to Stroot, unfavorable calls 
by the referees against CLU and Pomona- 
Pitzer were major factors in the game. 

"The refs, I think, were also not in our 
favor," Stroot said. "They called a very 
tight game and that makes it hard to play 
aggressive. 

"Normally, you get a ref that calls a 
tight game and the other is pretty lenient 
and it usually balances out. But [in] this 
game, they were both calling ticky-tack 
fouls. At one point, if anyone else fouled 
out, one team would be playing with only 
four players. We've usually had pretty 
good luck with refs so far, but this time 
they were pretty horrible." 



Stroot also said that free throws and 
rebounds are big issues for the team. 

"Those tend to be the deciding fac- 
tors," Stroot said. "We always play really 
hard and it's tough." 

Cichon did not find going into over- 
time an improvement for the team. 

"If we'd stepped it up, it wouldn't 
have gone into overtime," Cichon said. 
CLU vs. University of La Verne 

The Regals lost to the University of La 
Veme Lady Leos, 83-63, on Feb. 18. 

Stroot led the team with 21 points. 
Brown scored 15 points and Mallen con- 
tributed 1 1 points. 

"There were some bright spots, in that 
some of our reserves who don't normally 
stand out, stood out," head coach Kristy 
Hopkins said. "I think that we learned that 
we need to be more physical to be a top 
team in our conference. La Veme is physi- 
cal on the boards and has good athletic 
ability. So from that stand point, I guess we 



Baseball beats Hayward, 
Point Loma & Cal Tech 



By Sean-Michael Porter 
Staff Writer 



The Kingsmen baseball team had con- 
tinued sucess by winning the series against 
Cal State Hayward and beating Point Loma 
before sweeping its open ing conference se- 
ries against Cal Tech. 
CLU vs. CSU, Hayward 

The California Lutheran baseball 
team took two wins out of a three game 
series against CSU, Hayward winning, 8- 
2, Sunday, Feb. 16, and splitting a double 
header, losing the first, 9-6, and winning 
the second, 12-2, Saturday, Feb. 15 at 
North Field. 

With the 8-2 win on Sunday, the 
Kingsmen improved to a 6-3 record. Se- 
nior Brian Skaug played exceptionally, go- 
ing 3-3 with an RBI and three runs scored. 
Senior Ryan Cooney also had three hits 
while junior Ryan Hostetler, senior Taylor 
Slimak and senior Jason Claros all had two 
RBIs. 

Senior Ryan Melvin pitched a com- 
plete game, striking out six Pioneers. 

"Melvin pitched a hell of a game. He 
put us in the position to win," Claros said. 

This weekend marked the return of 
outfielder Claros who had missed the 
Kingsmen 's first six games due to injury. 
His return was a boost for CLU as he ig- 
nited the 12-2 victory over the Pioneers in 
the second game of the doubleheader on 
Saturday. 

Claros contributed to a 19-hit game by 
the Kingsmen. The eventual game-win- 
ning run was scored in the third inning 
with CLU leading 2-1. Junior Ed Edsall 
singled to center field, scoring Claros from 
second base. 

CLU went on an offensive onslaught 
adding three more runs in the sixth and 
another five runs in the seventh inning. 
Six CLU batters had multiple hits. Claros 
returned to the line-up with a bang going 
3-for-4 and had four runs scored. 

"1 feel I played well this weekend," 
said Claros. "It's good to finally be back." 



Not to be outdone, Slimak also went 
3-for-4 and Cooney went 2-for-5 with five 
RBIs. 

Freshman sensation Matt Hirsh 
pitched his second complete game of the 
season, striking out seven Pioneer batters 
and walking just one. 

"I was in a good rhythm," Hirsh said. 
"We played with more intensity the second 
game." 

The opening game seemed to be going 
the same way until CLU blew a 6-2 lead 
late in the game. In the ninth inning, Hay- 
ward put up four runs on a single, a home 
run and two doubles. With two outs still 
trailing by one run, a throwing error by the 
Kingsmen allowed the tying run to score. 
The Kingsmen went down in order, send- 
ing the game into extra innings. 

The Pioneers loaded the bases with 
two outs in the tenth inning. Pioneer pinch 
hitter Gabe Gonzalez hit a three-run double 
to right center, putting the Pioneers up 9-6. 
CLU went down in order again to end the 
game. 

Junior Jason Hirsh played impres- 
sively, giving up two runs and striking out 
13 batters in seven innings of work. Edsall 
also played well going 3-for-4 with three 
RBI and a run scored. Both Edsall and se- 
nior Jeff Myers hit home runs in the loss. 
CLU v£ Point Loma 

Three runs scored in the ninth inning 
gave the CLU baseball team a 6-4 come- 
from-behind victory over Point Loma Naz- 
arene Wednesday, Feb. 19, in San Diego. 

After trailing 4-3 going into the ninth 
inning, CLU loaded the bases with three 
consecutive singles. Cooney grounded 
out scoring sophomore Tim Penprase 
from third base to tie the game. After an 
intentional walk to Edsall, Slimak singled 
in junior Ryan Hostetler for the eventual 
game-winning run. Senior Luke Stajcar 
ended the rally with a sacrifice fly, giving 
CLU one more run. 

Both teams were tied after one before 
the Crusaders scored three runs in the sec- 
ond inning. The Kingsmen added single 



runs in the third and seventh innings. 

Four CLU batters had two hits. Mr. 
Consistent, Slimak, finished the game with 
a pair of RBIs and the Comeback Kid, 
Claros, had three runs scored. 

Jason Hirsh got the win for the Kings- 
men as a reliever. Hirsh threw the final 
three innings of the game and gave up zero 
runs and just one hit. In three innings, 
Hirsh stuck out five Crusaders. 
CLU vs. Cal Tech 

The Cal Lutheran baseball team swept 
Cal Tech in a three- game slaugher, win- 
ning the first game, 23-0, Friday, Febru- 
ary 21 at North Field and then followed 
up with 17-2 and 18-2 victories Saturday, 
February 22 in Pasadena. 

A total of 25 hits improved the Kings- 
men to an 8-3 overall record while the Bea- 
vers fell to 1-4 in the first league game of 
the year for both teams on Friday. 

CLU scored ten runs in the second in- 
ning and followed that up with a nine-run 
inning in the sixth. Eight CLU players had 
multiple hits. Senior Matt James went an 
amazing 5-for-5 with three RBI and for 
runs scored. 

"It was a good way to start-off the sea- 
son," James said. 

Also contributing were Myers with 
three RBIs and Slimak with three hits. 
The play of the day came from freshman 
Brandon Sontag who, on his first collegiate 
at bat, hit a home run. The home run came 
on the first pitch and his first collegiate 
swing. 

"It was amazing, " said Sontag. "My 
teammates were just as excited as I was." 

Sontag finished the day going 2-for-3 
with four RBIs. 

All three of Cal Tech's hits came in 
the seventh and final inning. The Beavers 
loaded the bases, but Myers struck out a 
Caltech batter to end the game. 

Junior Josh Benson pitched in three 
innings and gave up no hits while striking 

out three Beavers^ 

continued on page 12 



learned something." 

Hopkins compared the game to the one 
on Friday versus Pomona-Pitzer. 

"It was an emotional game on Friday, 
because we were leading most of the game 
and thinking we had a win if we could just 
hold on," Hopkins said. 

"Whereas the game versus La Veme, 
it was not as close in the second half and 
they were beating us with rebounds and 
their athletic ability, which got frustrating 
... They were definitely two different types 
of games." 
CLU vs. Occidental 

The Regals fell to Occidental College, 
71-63, on Feb. 21. 

Stroot scored 21 points, followed by 
Brown who had 15 points and Cichon who 
had 10 points and eight rebounds. 

The Regals competed against the 
University of Redlands on Monday, Feb. 
24, but the results were not available at 
presstime 



this week's 

Kingsmen & 

Regals action 



Today, Feb. 26 

-w basketball v. Whittier 
7:30 p.m. *LAST HOME 
GAME OF THE SEASON 

Thursday, Feb. 27 

-m basketball v. CMS 
7:30 p.m. *LAST HOME 
GAME OF THE SEASON 

Friday, Feb. 28 

-baseball v. Whittier 

2:30 p.m. 

-softball at Occidental 

Saturday, March 1 

-w tennis v. La Verne 
9:30 a.m. 

-m tennis at La Verne 
-track v. Redlands & CMS 
at Redlands 
-softball v. Occidental 
noon & 2 p.m. 
-baseball at Whittier 

Tuesday, March 4 

-golf v. CMS, home match 
at Sterling Hills 
12:30 p.m. 



home games indicated by italics 



12 The Echo 



Sports 



Avedian leads the way for 
basketball wins in SCIAC 



By Luke Patten 
Staff Writer 



The CLU men's basketball won each 
of their games over the past two weeks, 
defeating Pomona-Pitzer by a score of 
72-63 and throttling Cal Tech, 87-45. Last 
week the team beat Redlands, 102-96, and 
Whittier, 77-75. The wins improved CLU's 
record to 16-7 on the season and 10-2 in 
conference play. 
CLU vs. Pomona-Pitzer 

In their match-up with Pomona-Pitzer, 
CLU needed a strong performance in the 
second half in order to get the win. 

The game started well for the Kings- 
men as they built up a small lead. Pomona 
would quickly answer back, however, and 
the score was close throughout the first 
half. CLU was held back in the first half by 
their poor shooting, as they only managed 
to hit 1 1 of their 28 shot attempts. 

The Kingsmen came out of the locker 
room in the second half with a renewed en- 
ergy and got their offense straightened out. 
That allowed them to build up a lead that 



forced Pomona to play a game of catch up 
for most of the second half. 

Junior Zareh Avedian led the way for 
CLU with 24 points and collected six re- 
bounds as well. Junior Ryan Hodges con- 
tributed 15 points and a game-high eight 
rebounds. Senior Victor Esquer added 14 
points and five assists. 

CLU was out rebounded 38 to 27, 
but they made up for it at the free throw 
line where they made 21 compared to 
Pomona's 10. 
CLU vs. Cal Tech 

Against Cal Tech, the Kingsmen 
started the game very slowly and struggled 
throughout most of the first half. In a game 
that they felt they should be dominating, 
and against a team that gets outscored 
by an average of 38 points a game, the 
Kingsmen were only up by 10 going into 
the half. 

According to Esquer, the team was 
able to use the half-time break to cum 
themselves, and the game, completely 
around. 

"We came out real slow and they were 



hitting all their shots," said Esquer. "Then 
in the second half, we started dominating 
like we should. We got on them on the 
defesive end and started getting the ball 
inside." 

Starting out slowly has become a bit of 
a trend for CLU as of late. That is some- 
thing that Esquer hopes his team can turn 
around quickly. 

"We've been having trouble getting 
started lately," said Esquer. "It can be 
tough against a team like Cal Tech, but a 
championship team does that; they bring it 
every night." 
CLU vs. Redlands & Whittier 

Avedian was the star of the past week, 
shooting a career-high 42 points to lead the 
Kingsmen over Redlands on Wednesday, 
102-96. He also hit the buzzer-beater on 
Saturday to get the 77-75 win over Whit- 
tier. 

The Kingsmen played at Occidental on 
Monday, Feb. 24 but results were not avail- 
able at press time. Their final home game 
is tomorrow, Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. against 
CMS at home. 



Baseball: continued from page 11 

The Kingsmen stole seven bases, in- inning but the fifth. Junior Ryan Ayers got TheTCingsmfrPhad 20 hits ii 



eluding three by Claros. 

Day two of the series ended in similar 
fashion as CLU dominated both games. 
In game one, junior Jake Highsmith went 
3-for-4 with four RBIs and two runs 
scored. Slimak, Sontag, and freshman 
Mark Nishimura all had three RBIs. 

"Everyone had the opportunity to 
play," James said. "It was good to see the 
young pups come through when they got 
their chance." 

CLU scored at least one run in every 



the win, throwing three innings and giving 
up one run. 

In the second game, Claros was solid 
going 3-for-3 with an RBI and three runs 
scored. He also had a triple and two 
steals. 

Freshmen Christian Hariot and An- 
drew James, along with seniors Ryan 
Cooney and Brian Skaug, had two RBIs 
each. 

Ryan Melvin picked up the win strik- 
ing out five Caltech batters. 



in each 

game Saturday, while Caltech had six hits 
in the first game and four in the second. 
Overall against the Beavers, CLU scored a 
combined 58 runs to the Beavers four runs. 
CLU had a total of 65 hits compared to 13 
hits by Caltech. 

"We didn't play down to their level," 
said freshman Wes Stevenson. "We played 
CLU baseball." 

The Kingsmen improved to 10-3 over- 
all and 3-0 in SCIAC play. CLU will host 
Whittier February 28 at 2:30 pm. 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 



Intramural Soccer Schedule 



Thursday, Feb. 27 

no games tonight due to 
home Kingsmen basketball 
game at 7:30 p.m. 



Soccer Playoffs 

next Thursday 
at 9 & 10 p.m. 



Sunday, March 2 

7 P.M. 

Mac Attack v. His Whole 
Life 

8 P.M. 

Junkyard Dogs v. Reebs 

9 P.M. 

Therapists v. Panda Ex- 
press 

10 P.M. 

XBA vs. Score 



InTRflmuRAL Soccer 


SmnDinGS (ns of 2.24) 


SCORE 


4-0 


XBA 


4-0 


PRRDR EXPRESS 


3-1 


ITI AC ATTACK 


3-1 


HIS WHOLE LIFE 


3-1 


HARDIHOOD STARZ 3-2 


THERAPISTS 


2-2 


DOR 


2-3 


CHIURS 


1-4 


EH6LES 


1-4 


REEBS 


0-4 


JUnRYRRD DOGS 


0-4 



February 26, 2003 



Indoor Soccer ALL-STARS 



-. 



Mike McCarthy 

Micah Schultz-Akerson 

Wes Johnson 

Autumn Saenz 

Whitney Fajnor 

John Oakman 

Tyler Ruiz 

Jake Card 



Laura O'Neill 
Brionna Morse 

KUNIMASA KlTAZAMA 

Matt White 

Josh West 

Ryan Quinn 

Alex Espinoza 

Mike Alexander 



Frank Quiapasa 

Yolanda Wilburn 

Kelsey Mitchell 

Donald Rejd 

Jon Chia 

Matt Tuason 

Micah Narua 

Steve Ford 



Track and 
Field Highlights 



Feb. 15 
Pomona-Pitzer Invitational 

"so. Ashleigh Poulin set new school 
record in pole-vault with 9'. 
'so. Aileen Kingsley also broke the 
record with a jump of 8'. 
*fr. Heather Worden won her heat of 
the 800m in 2:35.96. 
*jr. Dereem McKinney and so. Lauren 
Mooney tied in the high jump each 
leaping 1.37m. 

*so. Courtney Parks ran the mile in 
6:13, then participated in the 4x400m 
relay with teammates Lindsey Moore, 
Carly Sandell and Worden just min- 
utes later. 

"other standouts in the women's mile 
were fr. Emma Holman who finished 
in 5:57 and jr. Amanda Klever who 
finished in 6:05, 

*so. Marcus Green finished first for 
the Kingsmen in both the 200m and 
the 400m, finishing in 23.61 and 
53.96, respectively. 
*fr. Adrian Cruz finished first for CLU 
in the discus and hammer throws with 
tosses of 32.8m and 34 62m, respec- 
tively. 

Feb. 22 
CMS/Rossi Relays 

"Poulin improved on her pole vault 
record by 4.5 inches, a jump of 9'4.5" 
"so. Lindsey Buffkin passed Kings- 
ley's vault from the previous week to 
claim the No. 2 spot with a jump of 
8'4.5" 

"McKinney leaped to a lifetime best in 
the triple jump with 30'3.75" 
"jr. Chris Hauser improved by 21 feet 
over his previous hammer throws to 
131 '8" 

"jr. Leah Bingham was the first non- 
scholarship finisher in the 100m 
hurdles, finishing in 17.36 ahead of all 
the other SCIAC runners 
"fr. Denise French leaped farther than 
any non-scholarship athlete in the 
long jump with a leap of 16.5m 

(Both of these were non-team scor- 
ing meets. Conference meets start 
this Saturday with CLU traveling to 
Redlands to compete against the 
Bulldogs and CMS.) 



NEW SPRING 

INTRAMRUAL 

SPORTS 

Softball: first game 
Sunday, March 3 

Basketball: 

first game 
Thursday, March 13 

keep checking the 

Echo for more 

updates! 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 43, No. 17 


60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 


March 5, 2003 


Sports 


Features 


News 


Baseball wins three games 


Harmony Week encourages acceptance 


Man arrested in 


against Whittier with a 


and tolerance among students. 


Thompson Hall. 


combined score of 29-4. 






See story page 10 


See story page 5 


See story page 4 



Honors program at CLU 



By Gianina Lomedico 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University stu- 
dents have a chance to broaden their intel- 
lectual studies with an honors program that 
was approved by the faculty last May. 

Faculty members are currently making 
and receiving proposals for a variety of 
honors classes. The committee is actively 
working in the hope of having enough 
classes next year. 

"The program will consist of intel- 
lectually challenging small classes focus- 
ing on student engagement," said David 
Marcey, biology professor and chair of 
the honors program. "Students will discuss 
and read primary and secondary literature 
as opposed to textbooks." 

The honors program has two parts. 
The University Honors Program will admit 



60 students per year. Out of the top 75 en- 
tering freshman students, the first 55 will 
be accepted into the program. Five more 
slots are open to first-year students based 
on interviews. 

The dean of admissions and honors 
committee will consider students' test 
scores, and whether a student has had at 
least a 3.0 overall GPA. In addition, up to 
five transfer students can enter the Honors 
Program either during their sophomore or 
the beginning of their junior year. 

The UHP will require a student to take 
20 units for the course of four years. The 
foundational seminar will allow a student 
to take two semester classes (eight units) 
in his or her freshman year and three up- 
per-division classes (12 units) in the next 
three years. Humanities Tutorial is the first 
seminar. The second foundational seminar 
has not yet been approved. 

"The seminars are more rigorous and 



"It is a wonderful pro- 
gram that will cross 
boundaries between 
interdisciplinary 
studies." 

Deborah Sills 
Religion Professor 

challenging than regular CLU curriculum," 
Marcey said. "They are more writing- and 
discussion-intensive. Learning will be ac- 
tive and not passive." 

The second program will be Depart- 
mental Honors. The DH Program will be a 
year-long eight-unit seminar that is a men- 
tored research or artistic project in the field 
project in which a student is majoring. 

A student will not have to be in UHP to 



participate in DHP. A student can achieve 
highest honors, both departmental honors 
and university honors, if he or she is in- 
volved in both programs. 

Deborah Sills, professor of religion 
and member of the honors committee, be- 
lieves that the program will be interesting 
for both faculty and students. 

"It is a wonderful program that will 
cross boundaries between interdisciplinary 
studies," Sills said. "The program reflects 
real life and is an opportunity to think in a 
new creative way." 

Junior Coreen Oshiro took Humanities 
Tutorial her freshman year at CLU. She 
said it was a great way to get core require- 
ments out of the way and that it encouraged 
her to think critically. 

"I still refer to my notes from that class 
to this day," said Oshiro. who is a psychol- 
ogy major. 



"elusive" performs at Club Lu event 



By Heather Ladwig 
Staff Writer 



Over 200 students showed up at 
Seattle's Best last Friday night, Feb. 28. 
California Lutheran University's senior 
residents assistants sponsored the event. 
Students were offered a free small or me- 
dium coffee of their choice, entertainment 
from their fellow classmates and a relaxed 
atmosphere in which to enjoy visiting with 
their friends. 

Like most other Club Lu events, 
the doors opened at 9 p.m. and students 
stayed well through 10 p.m. Seniors Josh 
Murray and Mark Glesne and juniors Nik 
Namba and Andrew Palmer, of CLU band 
"elusive," entertained students during the 
event. 

One of the goals of Student Programs 
this year is to make events such as Club Lu 
bigger and better, allowing the students to 
enjoy safe, fun and, most important, free 
activities to do on the weekends. 

"It went really well," senior Sally 
Sagen said. "It was pretty crowded, but 
it was good to have so many people come 



and stay and have a good time." 

Junior Meredith Ebert said she was 
planning on stopping by and ended up 
staying a bit longer. 

"It was fun, I saw a lot of people, 
stayed a while and listened to some really 
great music," Ebert said. 

Many other students entertained the 
crowd, including senior Charlie Duarte, 
junior Robert Howie and Palmer. The 
crowd enjoyed Duarte's harmonica/guitar 
performance. 

"The free coffee and the dude with the 
harmonica made my life much more mean- 
ingful," senior Sara Kvidahl said. 

By 10 p.m. students crowded inside 
and outside the coffee shop, finding it very 
difficult to stand in one place without let- 
ting people by. Among the crowd were 
senior RAs Christine Casad, Nicole Hack- 
barth. Margaret Miller, Stina Odegard and 
Erika Verrone. 

"It was nice and relaxing to sit back 
with my friends, drink coffee and have a 
low-key and entertaining night out," said 
ASCLU President Hackbarth. 

In addition to the free coffee and live 
entertainment, students also had a chance 




Photograph by Laura Rodgers 
Sophomore Mary Schwichlenberg enjoys the live music during last Fridays Club Lu 
event at Seattle s Best Coffee in Thousand Oaks. Calif 



to win a ticket to this year's Spring Formal 
on April 12 at the Paradise Pier in Ana- 
heim, Calif. Junior Holley Halweg was the 
lucky winner last week. 

Programs Board is also planning to 



give away a ticket(s) at CLW next Friday 
night, March 14. 

This weekend is Siblings Weekend 
and Programs Board will be hosting Club 
Lu at "Golf N' Stuff." 



Programs Board discusses upcoming events 



By Christa Hudson 
Staff Writer 



Issues concerning movie night, Spring 
Formal ticket prices and other budget is- 
sues were brought up at the Programs 
Board meeting on Monday, Feb. 24. 

The location of movie night has met 
with many struggles. The original plan was 
to rent out the theater in the Oaks Mall on 
April 4, but it would have required addi- 
tional thousands of dollars. 

"We can afford to buy out the Simi 



Valley theater, but we would be seeing 
'older' movies," said Programs Board 
member Heather Ladwig. 

The Simi Valley theater plays movies 
that have been in theater for a while but 
have not yet been released to video. Board 
members struggle with wanting to make 
movie night a community-building event, 
but they also don't want to lose their previ- 
ous high attendance for this event. 

"We don't know if we want them to 
show one movie or two. There are 150 
seats in one theater and another 1 50 in Si- 



mi's other auditorium. Our goal this year is 
to make our event bigger and better. We are 
trying to see if we can get special prices for 
the concession stand for CLU students," 
Ladwig said. 

However, playing a classic movie at 
the theater, such as "Top Gun," instead 
of viewing a more current release was 
discussed. 

"We may still just hand out $5 movie 
passes at the Jams Mall like we did the 
previous year, which was a huge success," 
Ladwig said. 



Programs Board members have been 
attempting to obtain for CLU students who 
attend Spring Formal a discounted price to 
the amusement park across the street. Tick- 
ets for the amusement park across the way 
turned out to be very expensive even with 
the corporate discount offered to CLU. 

"The ticket price is $40 for one park, 
which is only a $7 discount from their 
normal prices. Plus, Southern California 
Discount Days might be going on around 
that same time [as the formal] 

Please see Programs Board, p. 4 



2 The Echo 



Calendar 



March 5, 2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 




today 

march 5 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 

Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

It hi hi mi Club Meeting 
Overton Hall 
8 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel 
9:11 p.m. 



thursday ^SS 

inarch 6 



Mathew's Leadership Forum 
Gym 

5 p.m. 



Intramural Basketball 

Gym 

8 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 

10 p.m. 



x Ci Sunday 




friday 

march 7 

Siblings Weekend 

Art Exhibition: Bob Privitt 

Kwan Fong Gallery 
7 p.m. 

Club Lu: Golf n' Stuff 

Golf n' Stuff. Ventura 
9 p.m. 

Saturday 

march 8 

Siblings Weekend 



march 9 



Siblings Weekend U 



Intramural Softball 

Gibello Softball Field 
8 a.m. 

Church 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 

Gym 
8 p.m. 

monday 

march 10 




ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
6:30 p.m. 



ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
8:30 p.m. 



IU 



8 



** 

\ k 



tuesday 

march 11 



Sister Friends 

Chapel Lounge 
5:15 p.m. 



A: foil 

■ 

r 



it 



/Is/an C7i/A and Friends 

Pederson Lounge 
6 p.m. 

Bible Study 

Chapel Lounge 
8 p.m. 



ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
5:15 p.m. 




Available during the fall or spring 
semesters of the sophomore or 
junior years. 

This academic program is 
designed so that you remain 
enrolled and earn academic 
credits at CLU, but live, study 
and work in residence serving 
as an American tutor at this 
university preparatory school in 



Study abroad IN RIMBACH, GERMANY 

the Odenwald region of Germany, to France, South-Tyrol in Italy or 
approximately 20 miles northeast Berlin) and to a number of other 
of Heidelberg, Germany. locations on shorter field trips. 



In addition to formal academic 
study, the tutor will assist with 
English language conversation 
sessions and with individual 
English language tutorials. The 
tutor will also join other teachers 
in leading student trips (possibly 



A minimum of two semesters of 
college German or the equivalent 
is necessary. Contact Dr. Herbert 
Gooch, Director of International 
Studies, Dr. Susan Corey, English 
Department, Dr. Walter Stewart 
or Dr. Paula Egnatchik, in the 



German department for further 
information. You may pick up 
application materials from Ms. 
Randy Toland, faculty secretary in 
the Humanities building. 

ATTENTION: 
NEW DEADLINE 
The deadline for applications for 
the fall semester, 2003 is March 
10,2003. 




Tutors Wanted: ACE Educational Services is looking for bright, 
dedicated people to teach 1 on 1 , in-home SAT 1/11 prep, and 3 
area of expertise. Pay starts at $15-20/hr. Transportation require( 
scheduling are flexible. Positions available throughout Los Angelt 
If interested, send cover letter & resume via i 
ACE Educational Services 
ATTN: instructor Hiring 
9911 West Pico Blvd., Ste PH-K 
fax: (310) 282-6424 
email: instructorhiring@acceducation.c( 



rademic subjects in your 
. We will train. Hours & 
s & the Valley. 



Summer Day Camp Help Needed: 

Seeking General Counselors & 

Specialist Instructors. Located just 

20 minutes from CLU. Staff can 

earn $2800-3500+ for the summer 

working w/ children outdoors! 

If interested, call: 

(888)784-CAMPor 

visit: www.workatcamp.com 



Classified ads can be placed 

on the Calendar page for a 

flat rate regardless of word 

count. Discount available for 

multiple issue orders. Ads are 

subject to editing for content 

& clarity. 

Call: 

(805) 493-3865 



College Democrats 



1- Meetina of the Semester 



New Day : Wednesday, the 26 ,h of March 
7:00pm in Nygreen 6 

Come talk about: 
California Democratic Party Convention, 
What we want to accomplish 
this semester and next year. & 
other up-coming events! 
PIZZA, SODA & any GOODIES 
you request will be served! 
Call me, Mady Stacy. Pres.. if 
you are interested in going or 
have any Q's 
Room: x2336. Cell: (209) 679-2312, 
Email: eandmadfa'aol.com . 
or stop by my room: North 1016. 3 rd Floor 



Join the College Democrats of CLU at the 

California Democratic Party Convention! 



You don't need to be a member to attend! 
March 14^16^. Friday - Sundav 



(We're leaving 1:30pm Friday afternoon and will be back Sunday 

evening) 

*It hosts elections for California Young Democrats [CYD] & California 

College Democrats [CCD]. which will have sessions you can sit in on. 

*Elected Officials will be there, including Gov. Gray Davis. The Gov. 

will be having a reception on Friday night, and the CDP will throw a 

party Saturday night! 

*Most cost will be covered, and pass fee can be waived if you volunteer 

to do check-in. 

♦If you are even slightly interested or have any questions, please don't 

hesitate to contact me, Mady Stacy by: 

♦Dorm: (805)241-2336 ♦Cell: (209)679-2312 

♦Email: EandMad^aol.com ♦Room: North 1016. back of 3' J floor 




Do you have some extra money to spend 

on a nice bathroom and/or kitchen 

cleaning? 

Well, it could be a possibility for next year! 

Marriott Services is looking into helping 

you keep that hair-infested bathroom 

and grease-covered kitchen cleaned! 

So, how much...? 



«y?i 

loom Service 



Well, the Apartments and Kramer resi- 
dents can get their bathroom and kitchen 
cleaned twice a month for S7S/mo and all 
other dormitories could pay to have their 
bathrooms cleaned twice a month Tor 
$S0/mo. 
How does that sound? 
Let us know what you think about the 

idea and prices. 

Call the ECHO at x3465 or email us at: 

echo@clunet.edu 



/I 


fifrl 







News 



March 5, 2003 



The Echo 3 



Diploma concerns arise 



By Brandee Tecson 
Star- Writer 



The quality of last year's diplomas 
was a controversial topic during Monday 
night's Senate meeting. 

The problem first came to the Senate's 
attention from last year's graduating class, 
which was dissatisfied with the diplomas 
received in the mail. 

•'Last year the graduates did not re- 
ceive a folder for the diploma, so when 
the envelope came in the mail [without it], 
they were a bit disappointed," said ASCLU 
President Nicole Hackbarth, who filled in 
as Senate director for Kristin Smith, who 
was out of town. "Senate is reaily looking 
into this issue. Now that current students 
have seen what they get, they are not 
happy." 

In 2000, the diploma was changed 
from a rather plain format to a larger, more 
stylized piece, resembling in some ways 
those of other universities, such as Pep- 
perdine. 

However, in the past couple of years, 
the diplomas have been printed on campus 
to save both time and money — some say 
at the expense of the diploma's quality. 

A primary complaint among students 
is that the quality and design of the di- 
ploma is the same as that of the Dean's 
Honor List and Scholastic Honor Society 



certificates. 

"It takes away the special-ness," said 
senior Christa Hudson, who would like to 
see the diplomas set apart from other uni- 
versity honors. 

"[The diplomas] are printed in house, 
so the gold university seal rubs off as it 
is run through the printer," said At-Large 
Senator Natalie Roberts, a senior. "The 
piece of paper itself is plain, unofficial- 
looking and not impressive. They're noth- 
ing special." 

As a graduating senior herself, Hack- 
barth agrees that the current diplomas need 
significant improvements. 

"The diploma is what shows your 
pride in our university. We want to be 
proud, as graduates from this school, to 
hang a diploma up on the wall," Hackbarth 
said. "Many students have told me that the 
current diploma is not worth hanging. That 
is disappointing." 

In response to the complaints, the ad- 
ministration plans to mail out the diplomas 
in a special case, but many students feel 
that does not fix the larger issue. 

"The folders are a nice addition to the 
presentation, but it is the piece of paper that 
gets hung on the wall," Hackbarth said. 

"We're frustrated with the diplomas 
because we expect something more than 
this poor representation from a school that 
we have attended for four years," Roberts 



said. "It doesn't capture our accomplish- 
ment." 

These criticisms have prompted the 
senators from all classes, not just seniors, 
to investigate the issue and meet with ad- 
ministration to see if they can improve Cal- 
ifornia Lutheran University's diplomas. 

At a meeting held a week ago, students 

"The piece of paper itself 
is plain, unofficial look- 
ing and not impressive. 
They're nothing special." 



Natalie Roberts 
Senator 

were given the opportunity to examine 
diplomas from other institutions and voice 
their concerns regarding the changes in the 
California Lutheran University diploma. 

"I believe there are some changes that 
certainly would enhance the look of the di- 
ploma and make it feel more professional 
and would give graduates more of a feel 
of accomplishment upon receiving it," said 
Sally Sagan, an ASCLU Programs Board 
senior representative. 

The university said it will cost approx- 
imately $10,000 to fix the current format, 



since the school printed the basics on the 
diplomas for roughly the next three years 
in order to get a bulk discount. 

Of the 5,000 pieces that were ordered, 
3,500 still remain. 

"While the university has stated that 
they are willing to consider the sugges- 
tions, it was made clear that many of the 
changes are not in the budget or will not 
be possible for the next few years," Sagan 
said. 

The Senate has until March 13 to ei- 
ther come up with the money necessary to 
fund the improvements or submit a specific 
design change that students would like to 
see. 

Nonetheless, some changes are being 
made to the diplomas this year, including 
enhancing the signatures of the president 
and chair of the Board of Regents. 

However, there are other changes stu- 
dents would like to see. 

Changes that students feel most 
strongly about are better paper quality, 
adding gold embossing to CLU, bold fac- 
ing and enlarging the graduate's name, 
enhancing the quality of signatures and 
recentering the CLU seal. 

"In reality, the diploma issue affects 
not just the students, but everyone con- 
nected with the university as well," Rob- 
erts said. "Is this the image CLU wants to 
project?" 



Pres. scholars visit Cal Lutheran 



By Julie Cole 
Guest Writer 



High school seniors from 18 states 
and one foreign country, 63 cities and 69 
high schools, arrived to the California Lu- 
theran University campus Sunday, March 
2, for this year's Presidential Scholarship 
Weekend. 

Sophomore Liz Ardis, biology ma- 
jor and intern at the Admissions Office, 
worked on the planning and organization 
of this three-day event. 

"It is one of the biggest events that we 
do by far," Ardis said. 

After examination of 253 applica- 
tions and essays, 75 prospective students 
were selected as finalists and 74 of them, 



73 from the United States and one inter- 
national student, came for the few days. 
Arrangements were made for the seniors 
to fly, ride the train or drive from their 
hometowns. 

The 47 girls and 28 boys were compet- 
ing for two full-tuition scholarships and 
four three-quarter scholarships. 

Their final assessment were the on- 
campus interviews that took place Monday 
morning, March 3. 

But the interview was not the only rea- 
son these promising students took a couple 
days off from high school. 

"These kids get to see campus, ex- 
perience the environment and live in the 
residence halls," Ardis said. "This event is 
unique to CLU." 

According to Ardis, not many univer- 



sities put in the time, money and effort to 
fly in their potential scholars for a few days 
to spend time on and off campus where 
they can meet future classmates and get a 
feel for college life. 

After their interviews, the prospective 
students were taken on a tour of Thousand 
Oaks, Calif., and then to Universal Studios 
City Walk for dinner and a change of pace 
from the morning. 

They departed Tuesday, March 4, hav- 
ing stayed two nights in the CLU residence 
halls. 

Ardis said the weekend was set up to 
make the high-school students feel com- 
fortable and welcome. 

"From the time they arrive at the 
airport or train station, someone will be a 
friendly face to welcome them, ease them 



in and answer any questions they might 
have," Ardis said. 

In the past, the Presidential Scholar- 
ship Weekend has been a memorable 
meeting place for future friends and ac- 
quaintances. 

"I went in knowing nobody and came 
out with an unexpected friendship and 
a roommate for this year," said Audrey 
Woods, a 2002 Presidential Scholar from 
Rocklin, Calif., of her experience last 
February. 

Woods' roommate, Katie St. Pierre 
from Bakersfield, Calif., said, "I just re- 
member it being like everyone already 
knew each other." 

The 2003 presidential scholars will 
find out their scholarship amounts March 
7. 



RHA evaluates visitation policy 



By Jessica Laufman 
Staff Writer 



Student concerns played a major role 
in the discussions of the RHA meeting held 
Monday, Feb. 24. 

RHA members brainstormed possible 
ideas in which to go about surveying the 
student body regarding the visitation 
policy. 

The concern about possibly changing 
the current visitation policy arose after 
students have been verbally expressing the 
need for possible revisions. 

Angela Naginey, assistant director of 
Student Life and Residence, said many 
students confuse visitation policy with the 
cohabitation policy. 

"The visitation policy regards the 
overnight stay or visitation of the opposite 
sex, which is not permitted between the 
hours of 2 a.m. and 7 a.m.," said Naginey. 



"A violation of the cohabitation policy oc- 
curs when a overnight guest of the same 
sex is not cleared by the area resident co- 
ordinator, or when a guest stays for more 
than two consecutive nights." 

RHA members do not want to change 
the policy; they just want to investigate 
what the student body thinks of it. 

"It happens every year; students al- 
ways complain about it. Any normal 18- 
year-old would say they wouldn't want 
someone telling them what to do. It's the 
same situation as telling a 21-year-old they 
can't drink on campus," Naginey said. 

Possible reforms that were discussed 
for the survey include changing restriction 
to apply during the weekdays, developing 
roommate contracts to establish visitation 
rules on a personal basis or abolishing any 
restrictions all together. 

Currently, Beckie Lewis, a national 
communications coordinator, has been 



contacting other universities around the 
country to investigate what visitation poli- 
cies have been working for them. 

"This issue was brought to attention 
from the students on campus. Right now 
we are simply just gathering information 
about what's out there," Lewis said. 

Plans for upcoming events were also 
reviewed during the meeting. 

Siblings Weekend will take place 
March 7-9. It consists of many activities 
for students and their siblings to participate 
in, including the Club Lu for that Friday at 
"Golf N' Stuff." 

Wacky Wild Hall Olympics will also 
take place that weekend on Saturday, 
March 8, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. 

"Wacky Wild Hall Olympics is an af- 
ternoon of Double Dare Activities. Come 
expecting to get down and dirty, especially 
when chocolate syrup is involved," RHA 
member Bobbi Jo Cyr said. 



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4 The Echo 



News 



March 5, 2003 



Hot tub plans canceled 



By Mark Glesne 
Staff Writer 



Recent plans to install a hot tub on 
campus halted last week after intial es- 
timates exceeded the Senate's annual 
budget. 

One of the top issues raised on student 
surveys annually is installing a hot tub 
on campus. Sophomore senator Dominic 
Storelli volunteered to head the project. 

"1 think that although a hot tub is a 
project that comes up on almost every stu- 
dent survey, there are several other areas of 
campus where the money would be used 



more efficiently, like the library," ASCLU 
President Nicole Hackbarth said. 

"I think that the idea of a hot tub is 
good but not when taken in context with 
what people are going to use it for. There 
are already rumors in the Lu Vine about 
stuff people do in the pool showers and 
bathrooms. I think that those activities 
would also take place in the hot tub," 
sophomore Corissa Gall said. 

"Bad idea. People don't respect prop- 
erty on this campus; I think they would 
trash it," senior Kenji Nishikawa said. 

The original estimate by the contrac- 
tors placed the price range between $8,000 



and $10,000. Storelli continued to propose 
to the Senate until the contractors re-esti- 
mated the cost at nearly $30,000. 

This ended Storelli's proposal, due to 
the lack of funding and importance. Sen- 
ate has a budget of approximately $ 1 1 ,000 
left, far short of the needed funds for a hot 
tub. 

"When they told us it was going to 
be 30 grand, that pretty much stopped the 
idea," Storelli said. "I think it would have 
been cool." 

"I think it's a cool idea," junior Julie 
Norman said. "But honestly, I wouldn't 
want to go in it. It would become a tub of 



nasty, nasty things. It would get out of hand 
1 think, sadly. 1 think the money could be 
better spent elsewhere, like Pederson, 
Thompson and Mt. Clef." 

"I think [a hot tub] would be disgust- 
ing," said senior JJ Grey. "It sounds good, 
but I don't want to think about what will go 
on in there. With 900 or some odd people 
on campus it would be dirty." 

"[A hot tub] would be all right," junior 
Keith Jones said. "I am just concerned 
what might happen with the late night 
activity. But it would be better than trying 
to sneak into one at a hotel or apartment 
complex." 



GEEEIHEEmna 



Man arrested in Thompson Hall 



By Karly Wilhelm 
Opinion Editor 



It's 3:30 in the morning and a drunken 
person is trying to get into your dorm. 
You've tried calling campus security and 
the RAs in your hall but receive no answer. 
What would you do? That is what hap- 
pened to me on Tuesday, Feb. 25. 

It began with someone pounding on 
my back window. Penny Johnson, my 
roommate, opened the window, and upon 
discovering that the person was not our 
third roommate, yelled at him to "knock 
it ofT 

The pounding stopped and we at- 
tempted to get back to sleep. However, 
a few minutes later our third roommate, 
Stephanie Soltero, came in and said that 
the person was now pounding on the side 
door of Thompson Hall. 

Soltero said she was "trying to fall 
asleep [when] I felt the walls begin to vi- 
brate as someone was pulling and pound- 
ing on the south door near our room." 

We slowly opened the door and looked 
out, not recognizing the person as a Cali- 
fornia Lutheran University student. We 
clearly noticed the person was male and 
was drunk. 

We immediately attempted to contact 



security. We tried calling several times, 
but no one answered the phone. We then 
tried contacting two RAs in our hall and 
received the same result. 

"At this point, my roommates and I 
were completely terrified," Soltero said. 
"Not only is some guy trying to break in, 
but no one is coming to help. Our last re- 
sort was to call the police." 

We called 911 and were assured that 
the police would be arriving shortly. 

Unbeknownst to us, the person had 
removed the screen off the laundry room 
window and, after opening the window, 
had climbed through. He was now in 
Thompson Hall. When police and security 
arrived, he was attempting to remove the 
screen from a resident's window to enter 
the room. 

Security described him as having eyes 
that were "red and watery." When they ap- 
proached him, he was attempting to remove 
the screen and the support molding from 
the window of the Thompson residence. 
He, at first, appeared to be confrontational, 
but soon calmed down. 

In days following the event, we found 
out more information. We learned the 
person's name was Tyler Karrels, from 
Minnesota. 

He was visiting a CLU student on 



campus. He was arrested by the Ventura 
County Police Department on charges of 
vandalism and public intoxication. 

The worst part about the entire ordeal 
was not being able to contact security 
when we needed them the most. The secu- 
rity report for that night states that Daniel 
Borgstrom, the security guard on duty, was 
"on his way and arrived within minutes of 
receiving the first call." 

The report states this was sometime 
around 3:40 a.m. However, discrepan- 
cies remain. I and several other witnesses 
believe that the security officer did not ar- 
rive until much later: so much later that he 
barely beat the police to the scene. 

"There is only one telephone intercon- 
nect line that is immediately available to 
the officer while they are on patrol," said 
John Fritz, manager of security and safety. 

"If this line is being used, the call rolls 
over to another line and a prerecorded 
message gives instructions. It is my feel- 
ing that this happened in this particular 
circumstance. The officer was unable to 
answer the call because he was at the lo- 
cation and multiple calls were attempting 
to contact Safety and Security at the same 
time," Fritz said. 

Fritz also said that a person makes a 
conscious decision to consume alcohol. 



and security cannot guarantee such an 
event will not occur again. 

"This department, like any other, can- 
not control [the student's] decision. We 
strongly support al! of the drug and alcohol 
education efforts being made on campus as 
well as the appropriate enforcement of uni- 
versity policy, and hope that students, visi- 
tors and others use mature reasoning when 
they choose to consume any substance that 
affects reasoning. 

"It appears this was not the case in 
this instance, and the Safety and Security 
response was well within university policy 
and intent in this instance. This to me is a 
success, not a failure," he said. 

Residence Life has assured Thompson 
Hall that it is reinforcing all of the common 
doors as well as repairing the laundry room 
window so that it does not open far enough 
for anybody to climb through. 

"I don't think campus security is near- 
ly what it should be. It's not safe enough 
on this campus; we need to have security 
guards to care more," said Julie Norman, a 
Thompson Hall RA. 

"I think security needs to be more 
dedicated with what they do, and granted, 
things like this don't happen very often, 
but when it does," Norman continued. "We 
shouldn't be scared for our lives." 



Programs Board, Cont'd 



Continued from page 1 

for both amusement parks," said assistant 
director of Student Life and Programs 
Sara Hartley. Programs Board got to vote 
on what meal to serve at the Spring For- 
mal. Their two choices that fit the budget 
were Chicken Italiana or Chicken Mar- 
sala. Additionally, a vegetarian dish will 
be served. 

April 7 will be the last day to buy tick- 
ets for spring formal. There will not be a 
couple discount this year. 

The venue for the CLU "Lu Down" 
has not been determined. 

"The Mechanical Bull is going to cost 
$ 1 , 1 00 even with the $500 discount that the 
owner is giving the school, and I only have 



$2,000 for this event, so I'm going to look 
into the prices for renting Borderline," said 
Programs Board member Jackie Oshann 
concerning the May 9 "Lu Down" event. 

CLW's Ron Adams and his profes- 
sional sound system have been canceled 
for this event. 

"The wrestling ring rental was $600 
flat, so all we have to worry about now is 
the fog machine," said Jonea Boysen, the 
Programs Board marketer. 

A limited amount of T-shirts will be 
sold for $5. 

Director of Student Life Mike Fuller 
had the pleasure of announcing to Pro- 
grams Board that their tuition has been 
approved for a raise next year. There were 



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March 5, 2003 



The Echo 5 



Features 

Harmony Week encourages 
students to accept each other 



By Cameron Brown 

STAFF WRITER 



Five days dedicated to the promotion 
of education, tolerance and acceptance 
of gays and lesbians was the intent of 
Harmony Week administered by the Gay 
Straight Alliance at California Lutheran 
University. 

"It is important to show support to the 
lesbian, gay. bisexual and transgendered 
of our community," said GSA Vice-Presi- 
dent Meagan Ranger. "It is imperative 
that we back the LGBT community, espe- 
cially at CLU. Remember, sexuality adds 
to who you are; it does not make you who 
you are." 

Harmony Week consisted of five 
events, one event per school day. The idea 
behind the events was to inform both gay 
and straight people that homosexuality 
should be something that is accepted, not 
bashed and belittled. 

Monday was Coming-Out Day. Stu- 
dents had the opportunity to support the 
GSA by going into a fake closet, which 
had been constructed by GSA members, 
and coming out of the closet, regardless 
of one's sexuality. 

According to Ranger, over 100 
students participated in the Coming-Out 
Day. 



Tuesday marked a Day of Silence for 
all willing to stay silent from 7:45 a.m. 
to 6 p.m. The people who partook in the 
event could not speak the entire day in or- 
der to symbolize how the gay community 
has been hushed for so long by the hatred 
and intolerance of society. 

The following day. members and 
supporters of the GSA wore blue jeans 
in memory of all those who have been 
persecuted, beaten and killed by other 
individuals who disapprove of homo- 
sexuality. The day was successful, and the 
people who took part in the event really 
were concerned about the well-being of 
other homosexuals, said the president of 
GSA, Nick Gordon. 

Day four of Harmony Week was 
Ally Day. Ally Day was held in the SUB 
and was open to anyone who wanted to 
become an ally, a supporter of gays and 
lesbians. Information was available for all 
who were interested. 

The final day of Harmony Week 
included a Bi-Scream Social located in 
the Apartments Lounge. Participants in- 
dulged in ice cream, watched the movie 
"In and Out" and enjoyed the company 
of friends. 

"The week turned out to be one that 
was filled with success and good times," 
Gordon said. 



Club profile: Gay 
Straight A lliance 



By Cameron Brown 

STAFF WRITER 



The Gay Straight Alliance Club at 
California Lutheran University "is com- 
mitted to diversity and understanding 
by promoting acceptance and tolerance 
through dialogue and interaction so that 
people can have fun and feel comfortable 
regardless of their sexual orientation," ac- 
cording to the GSA mission statement. 

For the past two years, GSA has tried 
to establish a comfortable environment 
for all those who wish to take a stand 
against the harassment and criticizing of 
homosexual, bisexual and transgendered 
people. 

"There have been unofficial clubs that 
represented the rights of homosexuals and 
bisexuals," said Nick Gordon, GSA club 
president. "But now, for the past few 
years, students have put together a club 
that is not only respected by the univer- 
sity, but also funded through the Multicul- 
tural Program." 

Because of the intense amount of hate 
that is acted out towards those of different 
sexual orientation, the club is crucial for 
those who are afraid of "coming out" or 
expressing their feelings regarding homo- 
sexuality, Gordon 'said. 

To be a part of the club does not 
mean that you have to be homosexual or 



bisexual. Since the club is named The Gay 
Straight Alliance, those who are hetero- 
sexual may also participate in the club's 
events and activities. The club has tried to 
appeal to all sexual preferences because 
it feels that it needs to reach beyond the 
boundaries of homosexuality and into 
other social classes. 

"Even though 1 am not a homosexual, 
I do support those who are," said fresh- 
man Jonathan Navarro. 

"I feel that it is important that people 
understand people, and that just because 
an individual chooses to be with the same 
sex. doesn't mean that they are any less of 
a person," said Navarro. 

GSA Vice President Meagan Ranger 
said that one of her responsibilities is to 
make sure that all the students, gay and 
straight, understand the club's intent and 
reasoning. 

On Feb. 23-March I, the club spon- 
sored Harmony Week at CLU, According 
to Ranger, the GSA has been planning 
Harmony Week since the beginning of 
the school year, and a lot of hard work 
and time went into making the week a 
success. 

"For the most part. Harmony Week 
was a complete success," Gordon said. 

"There were only a few people who 
had disapproving comments, but even 
they couldn't stop the prosperity of the 
week," he said. 




Photographs courtesy of GSA 
Blue jeans lined Memorial Parkway on Wednesday lo remind students of those perse- 
cuted/or their sexuality. 




Photographs courtesy of GSA 
GSA members Nick Gordon. Holly Wilson and Carrie Missall, celebrate Harmony 
Week. 

Biology students 
research in Hawaii 



By Christian Coleman 

STAFF WRITER 



The location is Hawaii, the islands of 
Lani and Maui. A research vessel with a 
crew of 22 students, a college professor, 
a dive instructor, a multimedia instructor 
and the captain of the vessel embarked on 
a journey to research the flora and fauna of 
Lani and Maui Islands. The students con- 
ducted at-sea field studies, which included 
studies of diversity and distribution of ma- 
rine organisms, plankton studies, marine 
chemistry, sediments and physical ocean- 
ography. The students also participated in 
an underwater scuba diving program. 

The Marine Science Program at CLU 
seeks to educate students about the con- 
servation and preservation of the world's 
oceans. The program is multidisciplinary, 
weaving the disciplines of marine chemis- 
try, physical oceanography and biology to- 
gether in a comprehensive, inquiry-based 
experience. 

"This unique program for undergradu- 
ate students provides an opportunity for 
students to participate in marine field stud- 
ies on a research vessel," said Dr. Andrea 
Huvard, chair of the biology department 
at CLU. 

The vessel-based portion of the field 
program has two geographical com- 
ponents, one in the Channel Islands of 



California and off of Lani and Maui of the 
Hawaiian islands. The program gets stu- 
dents out to sea three times a year; twice in 
California, once in the fall and spring and 
for 10 days in January. 

Along with 22 students, there were a 
significant number of non-biology majors 
who decided to participate. Some were 
communication, criminal justice, political 
science and liberal arts students who were 
interested in learning more about nature. 

"We believe that all students regard- 
less of their major should also have the 
opportunity to spend time in the field. 
We therefore have an integrated pro- 
gram where non-science majors can take 
lower — division Oceans or Environmental 
Science and then take the field course as 
their second science class. In this way, 
all CLU students have the opportunity to 
learn about and experience the ocean," 
Huvard said. 

Two undergrad students, Sam and 
Chris Mazza, who participated in the re- 
search trip, had a fantastic time in Hawaii. 
"The food was top notch and I got to see 
the beauty of Hawaii on and off the boat," 
said Chris Mazza, a junior biology major. 
"In Hawaii, I went snorkeling, scuba 
diving and, believe it or not, I tripped on 
a giant sea turtle, which are protected by 
law in Hawaii, and if caught harassing 
them, you can bet on a $5,000 fine by the 
end of the trip," said Sam Mazza, a junior 
biochemistry major. 



6 The Echo 



Features 



March 5, 2003 



Campus Quotes 



Who is God to you? 




Julie Norman, Spanish/sociology, class of 2004 Nicole Biergiel, English, class of 2004 Ryan Mayfield international studies, class of 2005 Sean Brosnan, history, class of 2006 

"He's real; He's the only reality there is "The love in all my friends." "God is good. God is life. God is free- "I think God is something made up by some 

and He's the only thing that matters." dom." old guys in the Roman Empire, and I feel bad 

for everyone who believes in God." 







Erik Hagen, multimedia, class of 2004 
"Atman and Brahman." 





Emily Moore, English/sociology, class of 2005 Andrew Palmer, pre-physical therapy, class of 2004 Liz Ardis, biology major, class of 2005 

"The assurance that everything in life will "It's personal to me because spiritually I don't "My comfort, my shelter, my strength, my 
tum out as it should be." know where I'm at yet." peace and my best friend." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jon Gonzales 



This week's crossword puzzle 

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9 Amount (abbr.) 

12 Friend 

1 3 Mature 

14 _ West 

1 5 Prophecy 
17 A band; link 

19 Father of detective story 

20 Drive away 

21 Hurl; toss 

23 Meridian (abbr.) 

24 Remove from set type 

27 Mineral 

28 Devotee 

29 Wand 

30 3rd note in musical scale 

31 Awful 

33 Books of Bible (abbr.) 

34 Vinegar ether 

36 Pale 

37 Enzyme (chem. suf.) 

38 Unit 

39 Will 

40 Young and gang suffix 



41 Character judgment 

43 Scrap of food 

44 Mars 

46 Not on shore 

49 Lubricant 

50 Ethnic division 

52 Dove sound 

53 Small 

54 Copy 

55 That girl 

DOWN 

1 Army Post Office (abbr ) 

2 Equal 

3 Gone by 

4 Wrap hay 

5 Lyric poem 

6 13th Greek letter 

7 Stomach lesion 

8 Halt 

9 Charm against injury 

10 Bad; wrong (pref ) 

11 Brewed drink 
16 Bed 

18 Treadle 

20 Restore service 



21 Haley's 

22 Get up "** 

23 Damage 

25 Not tight 

26 Come in 

28 Evergreen 

29 Bread roll 

31 Devil 

32 Ardent follower 
35 Mexican food 
37 Add to 

39 Provide food 

40 Standing room only (abbr, 

42 Payment for occupancy 

43 Reed instrument 

44 War prisoner (abbr.) 

45 Untruth 

46 Bowed; curved 

47 Fish eggs 

48 Beetle 

51 Southern state (abbr.) 



Arts 



March 5, 2003 



The Echo 7 



Gardner's "A Midsemester 
Prom Night's Dream" is a 



By Leah Sanchez 

STAFF WRITER 



The Kingsmen Shakespeare Company 
performed a dress rehearsal of "A Midse- 
mester Prom Night's Dream" on Feb. 26 
at 6 p.m. in the Preus-Brandt Forum. The 
play was written and directed by Ken 
Gardner and is based on Shakespeare's "A 
Midsummer Night's Dream." The show is 
part of the Kingsmen Education Tour that 
will be traveling to several schools in the 
Conejo Valley over the next few weeks 
along with workshops for the children. 

"Sit back and pretend that you are 
eight to 10 years old," said Gardner at the- 
beginning of the show. 

The style of writing is aimed towards 
a younger audience. The play takes place 



on prom night at Millenium Oaks High 
School and in the Millenium Oaks Woods. 
The main character, Helen, played by Van- 
essa Claire Smith, is in love with Donnie, 
played by Derek Medina. Unfortunately, 
Donnie loves Mia, played by Anastasia 
Drake. Mia could care less about Donnie 
because she only has eyes for Zander, 
played by Brett Elliott. 

"It's a bunch of love triangles," 
Gardner said. 

Helen falls asleep and dreams that she 
is in a Shakespeare play and can't figure 
out why everyone is talking so funny. The 
characters of Puck and Bud, played by 
former CLU drama professor Kevin Kem, 
and Haley White, a Cal Lutheran alumni, 
come into Helen's dream in the Millen- 
nium Woods and put love spells on Donnie 
and Zander. This causes complete chaos 



CD Review 



"The Ugly Organ 



•>•> 



By Trevor Kelley 

STAFF WRITER 



Cursive's Tim Kasher has always 
lingered in the shadows. As one of the 
founding fathers of the now white-hot 
Omaha, Nebraska indie rock scene, Kasher 
lays claim to some pretty serious bragging 
rights. 

He taught current college rock heart- 
throb Conor Oberst of Bright Eyes how to 
play guitar, and was trailed around adoring- 
ly by the members of electro-pop sensations 
the faint years before they went inner-city 
cool. They're all great friends now, but as 
recent years have found Kasher shaded by 
the high profiles of those very same friends, 
many have wondered when justice would 
be served. Would Kasher get his moment 
in the sun? 

So. alas, here comes Kasher with the 
fourth Cursive album, "The Ugly Organ," a 
record so good you couldn't ignore it if you 
tried. Filled with bits of Fugazi-like rapture, 
Radiohead-esque mind warps and its fair 
share of straight-up, midwestern emo rock, 
"The Ugly Organ" is by far one of the most 



stunning pieces of Kasher's lengthy musi- 
cal legacy. It's an album about growing up 
too soon, bandaging your scars and making 
amends with your art. The album's standout 
track, "Art Is Hard," says this better than 1 
ever could, with Kasher crying out that he's 
"tired of entertaining," his band's clanging 
guitars and stirring cellos perfectly framing 
him. 

Art may be hard, but being an artist in 
this game called rock has never sounded this 
easy. And that's exactly what Tim Kasher 
is: an artist. 

It's often been said that artists never 
gain notice until they are either dead or ir- 
relevant, which makes "The Ugly Organ" 
all the more riveting. This is Kasher's great- 
est musical statement, and it's come to him 
at a point when people are actually listening 
and caring. 

For my money, "The Ugly Organ" is 
the best rock record you'll hear all year. 
And even as the 2003 calendar whips 
by — the Thursdays blurring with the taking 
back Sundays — I'll bet the farm on Kasher 
looming large over his peers as a true savior 
soaking up his long-awaited moment in the 
sun. 



puzz130 

Answers to last week's crossword puzzle 



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between the four lovesick teens. In the end, 
Helen is elected prom queen and gets Don- 
nie, the man of her dreams. Zander and 
Mia end up back together and everyone is 
happy. 

The play was rather short, but had the 
audience laughing throughout the duration 
of the show. 

"It has to be 45 minutes to fit the for- 
mat of the schools that we are visiting," 
Gardner said. 

"It was funny and entertaining for kids 
as well as for adults," CLU alumni Barry 
Finnegan said. 

The play features three original songs 
written by Ken Gardner and Ron DiBuc- 
cio. 

"The music helped out a lot," said Paul 
Benz, a student at CLU. 

The cast added dance moves to the 



songs and got the audience involved. 
There was never any downtime in the 
play, everything and everyone was con- 
stantly moving. Medina's character, had 
the audience rolling with his Jim Carrey- 
like facial expressions, and the rest of the 
cast complemented each other well. 

"The cast was very high energy," Benz 
said. Haley White, who plays Bud, was 
also the costumer for the play. She had 
Mia Zander dressed in gold and brown 
and Helen and Donnie dressed in blue, 
which helped the audience keep track of 
the couples when the love triangles started 
getting complicated. 

At the end the cast got much applause, 
and nearly everyone in the audience had 
smiles on their faces. 

"Ken Gardner is brilliant," CLU alum- 
ni Emily Maclntire said. 



ISSY customizes the 
template dialogue box 



The last ISSy column provided in- 
formation about accessing templates in 
Microsoft Word, including how to modify 
and customize these wonderful time savers. 
This-week JSSy describes how to create ad- 
ditional tabs (categories) that will display in 
the template dialog box. (Note that user-cre- 
ated templates are saved by default to the 
Templates folder, and as such, they appear 
under the General tab in the Templates dia- 
log box.) To create a new tab in the dialog 
box, complete the following steps; 

• Create the new template. 

• Click on File and choose Save As. 

" In the Save as type dialog box select 
Document Template (*.dot). 

• In the Save As dialog box click on the 
Create New Folder icon. In the Name text 
box type the name you wish to appear on the 
tab. Click OK and then click Save. 

" The newly created template will now 



appear under the customized tab in the Tem- 
plates dialog box. 

Note: To access the Templates dialog 
box: 

• Open the Task Pane from the View 
menu. 

• Click on the General Templates option 
in the Task Pane. 

If you have any questions regard- 
ing templates, contact the Help Desk at 
help@clunet.edu or extension 3698. 




ISSY's 

PUTER 
TIPS 



S1HT 



71 



web Pore/ 



and NOT 
just online 

Fare is roundtrip from Los Angele 



London $319 

Paris $363 

Amsterdam. ...$427 

Sydney $1079 

Madrid $418 

Rio de Janeiro. ..$598 

Subject to change and availability. Tax not included, 
tions and blackouts apply, est. 1017560-10 



7280 Melrose Ave 
18111 NordhoPP SG. 

** www.sCatravel.com 

Line >> on the PHone >> on cnmpu/ 



(323) 934.8722 
(818) 882.4692 



TRAVEL 



OH THE /TREET 



8 Tie Echo 



Opinion 



March 5. 2003 




How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor 

are welcome on any topic 

related to CLU or The Echo. 

Letters must include the 

writer's name, year/position 

and major/department. 

Letters are subject to editing 
for space and clarity. 



Printing 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be published 
on the following dates: 

April 2, 2003 
April 23, 2003 
May 14, 2003 



Election controversy: unnecessary 




By Michele Hatler 
Editor in chief 



After being approached by sev- 
eral members of the California Lutheran 
University's Executive Cabinet about the 
front-page article that ran on Feb. 26, 
2003, I decided to discuss it this week in 
my editorial. 

The article was a recap on the AS- 
CLU student elections for the 2003-2004 
academic year. The reporter covering this 
was Jennifer Pfautch. and the headline read 
"Boland defeats Smith." 

After being tracked down and e- 
mailed about the "negative and insensitive 



article" — the exact words from complain- 
ing students — I carefully re-examined the 
article to see what all of the distress was 
about. The article gave the date of the 
event, the voting results and provided in- 
terviews with both new members and those 
that were not voted in. 

So here are my responses to the ar- 
ticle and the numerous complaints I have 
received. The complaint I got at least 
three times was that the article had nega- 
tive undertones toward the newly elected 
Executive Cabinet. The article contains 
four quotes from four different people. 
One quote from candidate Holly Hoppman 
gave her opinion on the new, inexperienced 
Executive Cabinet. Although her quote did 
not praise those newly elected, she just 
pointed out factual information. The new 
Executive Cabinet does not have a lot of 
experience, so it will be a learning experi- 
ence for them. The three other quotes gave 
positive attributions to the elections. 

Another point that was brought to my 
attention was the insensitivity of the head- 
line, "Boland defeats Smith." The word 
"defeat" is used throughout The Echo, 
especially in the Sports section. 



Since "defeat" is neither a biased word 
nor inconsiderate, it was used. 

Granted, newspapers will always 
receive criticism from somewhere. But or- 
ganizations and groups, like the Executive 
Cabinet that know what it is like to deal 
with unnecessary or uneducated criticism, 
should be a little less quick to get so upset 
about something like an article that only 
had reported the facts of an election. The 
Echo doesn't always cover every event on 
campus perfectly, but the election was cov- 
ered with interviews from more than one 
side and reported the overall results. 

It may seem like The Echo is insensi- 
tive, but our goals are just to report what 
happens around campus. Communication 
and journalism students get a chance to 
leam about reporting, which is what most 
of them are doing — learning. The goal of 
The Echo is not to praise or to condemn 
any one group or persons; that would be 
editorializing. For those who aren't famil- 
iar with our guidlines, please feel free to 
take a news writing class here on campus 
or contact us at echo@clunet.edu. 



Letter to the Editor 



Dear Echo: 

Incredibly, it's been exactly eight weeks today that I have 
enjoyed German culture, food and scenery. There are no words 
to describe the breath-taking bliss that is the wintry wonderland 
that surrounds me, and it just keeps getting better. I live a five- 
minute walk away from the Burg Lindenfels, which is the ruin of 
a fortress built in the 1 2th century, complete with towers, a prison, 
courtyard and wishing well. Incredible. Driving at night, you 
don't notice the cityscape, but you can't miss the castles on both 
sides of you when you drive down the Autobahn. When I'm not 
reveling in my medieval mindset, I'm sallying forth on my own 
adventures of today, attempting things that I've never done before; 
motorcycling through the countryside, riding half-pint Icelandic 
horses English-style through the fields and maneuvering through 
the cities, shops and roads. Also the school where I teach, Martin 
Luther Schule in Rimbach is enormous compared to the tiny grade 
school and high school that I had previously attended, meaning 
about eighty students per grade. I assist with teaching English, 
rotating between the 5th, 6th and 7th grades, which is incredibly 
fun. It gives me the liberty to see the gleam in their eyes when they 
learn something exciting and novel. Erin Birch, who is a graduate 
from St. Olaf in Minnesota and also teaches conversational Eng- 
lish, and I have begun a theater group for the 6th and 7th graders, 
in which we direct skits and sketches that will be performed at the 
end of the school year. The classes that I am taking in addition to 
teaching are fantastic. Reading and discussing "Faust" in German 



is something I never thought I'd be doing when I first sent in my 
application to California Lutheran University. 

Outside the classroom, I get as much of an education when 
I sit with my host family or my friends and discuss topics such 
as how they were affected before and after the Berlin Wall came 
down. Or I learn life skills like how to take a bus or a train, both 
of which I'd never done before in the States (it's a lot harder when 
all the signs and instructions are in German, believe me). You get 
a little of the bad with the good— for instance, I get a lot of ques- 
tions concerning my position on the potential war with Iraq, which 
is more of an open forum for discussion than any real problem, 
and the discussion is always better when you sit down in a Cafe 
at about 4 p.m. with your coffee and a piece of Kuchen. That is an 
incredibly noteworthy part of Germany, and if you ever make the 
joumey, get yourself a piece of Kuchen and, of course, a cup of 
coffee (though the closest Starbucks is about an hour away — and 
in most places they have absolutely no concept of a mocha, or, 
worse yet, a caramel macchiato) and plaudern until the sun sets on 
the mountains and pink streaks through the wispy trees and lofty 
cathedrals turning orange, then green, then gone. leaving nothing 
but a crisp, clean, cold night sky, strewn with brilliant stars. 'Til 
we meet again, I hope life's treating you all fantastically. 

Leah Jurgens 
Class of 2004 
German Major 



The 



Echo Staff 



Michele Hatler 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation'/ 

Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 
Business Manager 

Brett Rowland 

News Editor 

Karen Peterson 
Arts & Features Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Opinon Editor 



Katie Bashaw 
Sports Editor 

Scott Gasperino 
Photo Editor 

Eric Ingemunson 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Heather Molloy 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Editorial Matter Pie staff of rhc Ixho welcomes comments 
on its article! as well as on the newspaper itself However, the 
staff acknowledges that opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Echo reserves Ifie right to edit all stones 
-editorials, letters to the editor and odier submissions for space 
reslricuons, accuracy and style. All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the advertis- 
ing party of otherwise specifically stated, advertisements in The 
Echo are inserted by commercial acliviues or ventures identi- 
fied in the advertisements dsemsclves and not by California 
Lutheran University. Advertising material printed he/em is 
solely for informational purposes Such printing is not to be 
construed as a wrinen and implied sponsorship, endorsement, 
or investigation of such commercial enterprises trr ventures. 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (8051 493-3865. 



Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief, The Echo, California Lutheran Univer- 
sity, 60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 92360-2787. 
Telephone: t805) 493-3465: Fas: 1805) 493-3327; E-mail 
echo@clunet.edu 



March 5, 2003 



Opinion 



The Echo 9 



Editorials 



Valuing the body and the spirit 



By Adam Martin 
Columnist 



Once upon a time in a land — well, 
a Garden, actually, called Eden — far, far 
away, two young people sat patiently 
as they were being lectured by a rather 
imperial Presence about what they could 
and could not eat in the Garden. "Okay 
kids, y'see that Tree over there? The one 
with the funky-looking apples? That's Big 
Daddy's real estate, so don't touch it OR 
the fruit on it. I kid you negative. Them 
fruits is lethal to the likes of you — com- 
prende?" Both young people (a man and a 
woman, incidentally) enthusiastically bob 
their heads like little schoolchildren, say- 
ing, "Good, God." 

After a well-known run-in with a rath- 
er crafty serpentine character, both young 
people are chowing down on fruit from the 
Tree of Knowledge. However, almost as 
if on cue. something in the mind of each 
young human goes *click.* They stop eat- 
ing, look around the Garden, look at each 
other, and let their eyes drift downward 
towards their own. ..bodies. It suddenly 
dawns on them that they do, in fact, have 
such things after all. They share a know- 
ing look, their eyes widening in fear. Then 
they run scampering in mortal dread, look- 
ing for some fig leaves. ..or a loin cloth. ..or 
a bra. ..or anything. ..screaming, "Good 
God!" 

Humorous or not, literal or figurative, 
every human being reenacts this story. 
Once upon a time, it was considered the 
source of most psychological neuroses, 
for which we can thank Sigmund Freud. 
Though we have obviously moved on from 
the idea that boys have a castration com- 
plex and women have penis envy, Freud 
did hit upon a valid point. He recognized 



the classic human relationship of the spirit 
to the flesh, or, as the philosopher Alan 
Watts puts it, the "embarrassment of 'hav- 
ing' a body." If it weren't so archetypal 
and often tragic, it would almost be comi- 
cal — every human being, whether boy or 
girl, awkwardly coming to terms with the 
reality of this bundle of flesh encasing us, 
realizing that it has processes, instincts and 
needs largely independent of our control. 
Coupled with this fact is the awareness 
that this body ages, decays and will one 
day die — a source of cold sweat down the 
spine if there ever was one! 

A great deal of metaphysics, religion, 
and philosophy in the West have accord- 
ingly dealt with trying to estrange the 
person from the body, whether as a source 
of salvation or a simple practice of mental 
discipline. From Christian ascetics and 
Stoics up to the stuffy mores of 19th-cen- 
tury Victorian England, one of our chief 
missions has been to tame the flesh as if it 
were a wild horse to be broken, a "savage" 
to be civilized, or a cancer to be removed. 
Thus says St. Paul in his first letter to the 
Corinthians: "But I keep under my body, 
and bring it into subjection: lest that by 
any means, when I have preached to oth- 
ers, I myself should be a castaway" (1 Cor- 
inthians 9:27). Thus also has said that great 
Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius; "But if 
to a state without sensation, thou wilt 
cease to be held by pains and pleasures; 
and to be a slave to the vessel [the body], 
which is as much inferior as that which 
serves it is superior: for the one is intel- 
ligence and deity; the other is earth and 
corruption" (Meditations, 3: 30-34). Des- 
cartes, contrary to our popular perceptions, 
was not the first to separate the mind/self/ 
soul from the body— it is a long-running, 
deeply ingrained cultural assumption that 
has allowed certain successes and yet has 



driven many of us quite mad. 

Do our bodies deserve this kind of 
abuse, especially considering our bodies 
predate the formation of our own day- 
to-day consciousness? Surveying the 
archaeological record, we find countless 
early ancestors of humanity— that is, their 
bodies — long before we encounter signs 
of self-conscious awareness — the aware- 
ness of death, the yearning for the infinite, 
the turbulent struggle of life, as depicted in 
primitive cave art at Lascaux, trinkets, to- 
tems, and elaborate burials. When it comes 
to the complete history of the complete hu- 
man being, it's a rather sobering fact that 
the body has an almost maternal seniority 
over the mind — and that the mind, or con- 
scious self, seems to be the rather uppity 
adolescent who, in typical teenage angst, is 
perpetually trying to leave the roost. 

As adolescents get nervous and em- 
barrassed in the company of friends when 
their parents are around, so we too get 
embarrassed when our bodies remind us of 
their existence and precedence over us. It 
would be a rare person who didn't sheep- 
ishly turn beet-red when the rather pungent 
aroma of flatulence issues from their body 
in public company. Who hasn't had to stop 
an engaging conversation or important 
meeting when one's bladder urgently tele- 
graphs the need to vent the ballast tanks, 
as it were? Who doesn't feel miffed when 
they throw their back out and cannot play 
sports? Who hasn't felt mortified at the 
Dionysian rush to one's loins occurring 
when we are in the presence of an attrac- 
tive person? It's not so much that we feel 
guilty, or repressed, but rather afraid and 
bewildered — our bodies are alien to us, 
they often act counter to our wishes, and 
they distract us from more "important" 
pursuits. 

The writer and psychoanalyst Nor- 



man O. Brown proposed a solution to 
this dilemma, using a prominent Christian 
symbol: "The Resurrection of the Body." 
That is, that we revivify our bodies and ac- 
knowledge them as parts of ourselves — in- 
deed, as the ground and root of ourselves. 
To feel the rush of hormones, to feel the 
energy tensed in coiled muscles, to feel the 
energetic sprinkling of delight of flavored 
foods in our mouths, to bathe in the endor- 
phins and sweat from physical exertion 
— whether athletic, occupational, or even 
carnal... to stop alienating ourselves from 
that with which we are most intimate, to 
reclaim it as our own, and thereby baptize 
it in the new birth of sumptuous, visceral, 
primal reality that is the flesh, and give it 
the same gravity, power and sanctity with 
which we imbue the life of the mind. 

This is by no means a plea for a new 
sexual revolution or indulgence of myopi- 
cally childish fantasies. Indeed, infantile 
fascination with sex through such medi- 
ums as pornography is symptomatic of the 
split between body and self, rather than a 
healing of the breach. No; we must allow 
equality of the "sexes" when it comes to 
the body and the mind. We cannot make 
our minds supreme, or our bodies; they are 
equal, and only when equality and commu- 
nion between body and mind exist can we 
be truly whole. We must not continue to 
think of ourselves as "spirits dancing in the 
flesh," but as a unified stream of experi- 
ence in which the material and immaterial 
bask in each other's glory. The miracle of 
the body is not that the soul shall leave the 
body after death, but that self and body are 
united in life. Monogamy between body 
and mind is the only true alchemy. Only 
when this bride and bridegroom consum- 
mate their marriage can we truly speak of 
"resurrection." 



Protesters: support our troops 



By Josh Simmons 
Staif Writer 



Every American has the right to pro- 
test against war in Iraq, but keep in mind 
that American troops have protected our 
rights for over two hundred years. 

Hundreds of thousands of troops are 
deployed in the Middle East; how do you 
think they feel after seeing priests, Holly- 



wood liberals and others protesting against 
the war and bad-mouthing America? 
These troops are risking their lives so 
that American citizens have the rights to 
march, burn flags and disrespect their own 
country. They are the reason we have a free 
media so that you can read my and others 
interesting newspaper columns. 

Keep in mind that it is Saddam Hus- 
sein who has slaughtered millions of his 
own people. There is little disagreement 



that Saddam is a brutal dictator, the main 
areas of disagreement are how to deal with 
him. It is great that many people have 
varying opinions. Living in a free country 
means that we can express these opinions 
without being threatened, but Iraqis do not 
have this right. 

Remember our men and women in the 
military are serving our country every time 
you see a flag being burned, remember 
them when this country is called a bully. 



remember them next time you are away 
from your family and friends and remem- 
ber these soldiers next time you feel like 
complaining. They have been deployed 
halfway around the world so that we can 
live safe, happy, freedom filled lives. 

To view a video of some of the 
typical war protesters, visit: http: 
//brain-terminal. com/articles/video/peace- 
protest. htmlQuestions or comments: 
jsimmon@dunet.edu 



Wrestler returns; lashes out at CLU 



Ladies and Gentlemen, this is the one 
and only too hot Scott Sanborn, part of the 
world famous tag team T.D.S. Here are a 
few thoughts about how much I loathe 
your precious little school. As you all 
know, last year my wrestling organization 
stopped in Thousand Oaks to give you 
guys something to do with your pathetic 
little lives on a Friday night. 

My partner Big Game James Hardmore 
and 1 want to tell you how disappointed we 
were with the whole thing. The attendance 
was horrible. Think about it: who wouldn't 
want to see two of the sexiest males this 
side of the country? Second, your gym 
stinks. I don't know why someone of my 



stature would ever be booked at a venue 
like that one. And lastly, your parking is 
atrocious. I had to park my brand-new Ca- 
dillac Escalade (on 24's) a mile away from 
the airplane hanger. I mean gym. 

So as it may seem, I'm not at all excited 
about coming back and wrestling for these 
loser California Lutheran wrestling fans 
out here. This year you fans have a choice 
to root for either the red team or the black 
team. Now I can't tell you who to cheer, for 
but I'll tell you this: the red team is a bunch 
of wimps. And so is that Commissioner 
Jimmy Fox. That's right, I said it: Fox is a 
wussie. I've had a gripe with that man ever 
since I've been associated with this organi- 



zation. Being involved in the show is one 
thing, but joining the red team is a conflict 
of interest and wrong! I've wanted to kick 
his butt for a longtime, so I can hardly wait 
for March 14 when I finally show him who 
the real bossofCLW is. 

So, boys and girls, bring your popcorn 
and your cameras because it's going to be 
one hell of a show. I really don't care who 
is on my team, as long as too hot Scott San- 
born, Big Game James Hardmore and the 
heavy weight champion. The Island Child 
whoop up on the red team and bring home 
the gold. I really don't care about anything 
or anybody. And if you root for Jimmy Fox 
and all those other red-team posers, then I 



don't care about you either. Lastly, to all 
the ladies out there, make sure you leave 
your men at home and look your sexiest 
because when T.D.S is in town, you know 
its gonna be a party! I'm out. 

Too Hot Scott Sanborn 
T.D.S. Tag Team Member 
CLW 

CLW is a Club Lu program brought to 
CLU by the Programs Board. Too Hoi 
Scott Sanborn is a wrestler invtoved in the 



10 The Echo 



Sports 



Basketball season ends 
with loss es for Kingsmen 



March 5, 2003 



By Luke Patten 
Staff Writer 



The CLU mens basketball team closed 
out its season last week with a pair of loss- 
es. They lost to Occidental, 76-63 and, in 
their last game, lost, 79-56 to Claremont- 
Mudd-Scripps. 

The team finished jts season with a 
16-9 mark overall and went 10-4 in con- 
ference play, good for second place in the 
SCIAC. 
CLU vs. Occidental 

Against Occidental, it was poor shoot- 
ing that ultimately did in the Kingsmen. 

For the game, CLU only managed 
to hit 18 of 61 shots. The main culprits 
were the normally stellar duo of senior 
Victor Esquer and junior Zareh Avedian. 



Athlete 

of the 

Month 




photograph courtesy of Sports Information 

jr. Julie Cichon 

Regals Basketball 

February Athlete of the Month 

-STARTED ALL 25 GAMES 
THIS SEASON 

-SCORED 268 POINTS OVER 
THE COURSE OF THE SEASON 
-LEADS THE TEAM WITH A 
.42 1 FIELD GOAL PERCENT- 
AGE, AN AVERAGE OF 6.7 
REBOUNDS PER GAME AND 26 
BLOCKED SHOTS 



"Julie is just a great player 
and team captain. she is your 
true definition of a leader, 

TEAM PLAYER ... It ISN'T TOO 
OFTEN THAT SHE IS GIVEN SOME 
KIND OF RECOGNITION FOR HER 
EXCELLENCE WITH SUCCEEDING 
AS A TEAM PLAYER, CAPTAIN AND 
GREAT STUDENT!" 

-TEAMMATE KRISTIE BaRRAZA 



They combined to shoot five of 29 from 
the floor. 

Esquer said the team was just having 
an off day. 

'it was a terrible shooting night. We 
were getting great shots, inside and out- 
side, but we just couldn't make anything," 
Esquer said. 

As cold as the Kingsmen were from 
the field, they were able to keep the game 
within reach, thanks to 27 turnovers by 
Occidental. 

Junior Ryan Hodges provided some 
punch to the Kingsmen attack and finished 
the game with 14 points and 10 rebounds. 
Avedian added 16 points and senior Noah 
Brocious totaled 12. points coming from 
four three-point shots. 
CLU vs. CMS 



The game against Claremont was the 
last game in the careers of CLU seniors 
Noah Brocious, Victor Esquer, Brendan 
Garrett, Charlie Kundrat and David Seals, 
as well as Pat Holmberg, who has been out 
all season with an injury. The game would 
be a disappointment for them as the 79-56 
spread was the worst loss of the season for 
the Kingsmen. 

"It was tough because we didn't really 
have anything to play for in that game and 
we just didn't bring it," Esquer said. "It 
was a pretty emotional night for us, being 
senior night and all, but it just wasn't there 
for us." 

Lack of rebounding did not help the 
Kingsmen that night. CLU surrendered 45 
rebounds, including 18 on the offensive 
end, to Claremont during the game. 




photograph by Diana lilipcsw) 
Senior Victor Esquer handles the ball in 
his last collegiate basketball game. 



Regals lose to end season 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



The Regals basketball team concluded 
its season last week with losses against 
Redlands and Whittier. 
CLU vs. Redlands 

The team lost to the University of Red- 
lands, 70-65, on Feb. 24. 

Freshman Lauren Stroot made 16 
points and seven rebounds, sophomore 
Brusta Brown netted 14 points and junior 
Julie Cichon recorded 10 points and eight 
boards. 

"I think we played hard and that we 
faltered and didn't win," Cichon said. 

"We gave a great effort," head coach 
Kristy Hopkins said. "I think we were just 
a little overmatched; [we were] right there 
the entire game and just couldn't pull it 
through in the end." 



"We came out as a team and we fought 
as a team," freshman Rachel Carver said. 

"It's just that we did not get to the 
point where we should have been ... and 
we just need to work some more on that." 

Cichon, Hopkins and Carver knew 
what lessons they and the rest of the team 
would use for the next game. 

"The main thing is our communication 
and to keep our shooting up," Cichon said. 

"Kind of what we've been saying all 
year and just come out and play hard and 
give everything we have and see what hap- 
pens," Hopkins said. "Tomorrow's our last 
game so we're hoping to make a very good 
last showing, a last hurrah. Maybe we can 
get a W and end on a good note." 

"I think we're going to take the energy 
that it's our last game and that we want to 
strive for the best and that we want to win 
and that we don't want to be beat again," 



Carver said. 
CLU vs. Whittier 

The Regals fell to Whittier College, 
74-52, on Feb. 26. Freshman Alexandra 
Mallen scored 16 points and 1 1 rebounds, 
Cichon had 1 points and Brown made five 
assists. 

The season proved to be a learning ex- 
perience for the team, according to sopho- 
more Courtney Lillich. 

"Our whole team's really young," Lil- 
lich said. "We learned a lot from each game 
whether we won or lost. It was fun getting 
to know people and the players on the 
team. It gave me something to do, because 
it took up a lot of my time and dedication. 
Hopefully next year, we can do better and 
use what we learned this season for next 
season." 

The team finished 4-21 overall and 3- 
1 1 in the conference. 



Baseball demolishes Poets 



By Sean-Micheal Porter 
Staff Writer 



The Cal Lutheran baseball team put 
together another stellar weekend as they 
sweeped Whittier College in a three-game 
series winning, 13-1 on Friday, Feb. 28 at 
North Field and winning, 13-1 and, 3-2 at 
Whittier Saturday, March 1, for a com- 
bined score of 29-4 over the weekend. 

A five-run fourth inning with back-to- 
back home runs propelled the Kingsmen to 
a perfect 4-0 record in the SCIAC Friday, 
Feb. 28. 

With the game tied 1-1, seniors J.R 
Cortez and Luke Stajcar helped jump-start 
the route. 

Junior Ed Edsall and senior Taylor 
Slimak singled to start the fourth inning. 
Cortez then crushed a three-run home run 
to left, his first homer of the season. Staj- 
car followed that with a home run to left 
center, his fourth of the year. 

Senior Jason Claros put the exclama- 
tion point on the inning with a double that 
scored senior Brian Skaug. 

CLU added another five runs in the 
seventh inning. Junior Ryan Hostetler 
and Claros had back-to-back doubles that 
scored a total of three runs. 

"We boat-raced them," said junior 
Jason Hirsh. "We knocked around their 
bullpen." 



CLU's pitching staff came to play as 
Hirsh threw a complete game scattering six 
hits while striking out seven batters on his 
way to his third win of the season. 

Slimak, Skaug and Stajcar all finished 
with three hits and four other Kingsmen 
had two hits apiece. Claros finished the 
day with three RBIs. 

Game one of the double-header fin- 
ished with the exact same score as Satur- 
day. Edsall continued his solid play as he 
started the game off with a three-run homer 
in the first inning. 

"This series was the best defense we 
have played 



sixth inning, contributing to the excellent 
pitching. 

"Our defense was awesome," said ju- 
nior Josh Benson. "We only had one error 
in 27 innings." 

"The whole team played up to its full 
potential this weekend," Ayers said. 

"Ed's home run set the tone for the 
day," said Stajcar. "That fired us up and 
we played with intensity from then on." 

The Kingsmen improved to 6-0 in 
the SCIAC and 13-3 overall. CLU hosts 
Bridgewater in a non-conference game 
March 6 at 2:30 p.m. 




Melvin in the Brian Skaug baited .500 against Whittier 



March 3, 2003 



Sports 



Softball improves SCIAC record 



The Echo 11 



By John Bona 
Staff Writer 



Although the Regals have struggled 
in non-conferences games this season, in- 
cluding two losses to Master's College this 
week, their season record improved with 
two wins against Occidental. 
CLl) vs. Master's 

The Cal Lutheran Softball team 
dropped both games of a doubleheader 
against Master's College last Wednesday 
in Santa Clarita. 

In the first game, the Regals held a 
slim 3-2 advantage going into the bottom 
of the fifth inning and seemed to have 
Master's in check. 

Then Master's came alive in the bot- 
tom of the fifth and sixth innings, scoring 
a total of four runs and pulling out the win, 
6-3. 

Emily Otineru had two of the Regals 
three runs in the first game, with Erin 



LaFata adding the third. Freshman Gianna 
Regal pitched the first four innings for Cal 
Lutheran while Kiley Kniest came on in re- 
lief and finished the game for the Regals. 

In game two. Master's College went 
right to work on the Regals pitching staff, 
boasting a five run lead after four innings. 

Cal Lutheran's troubles continued on 
offense as well, managing just two hits and 
failing to bring home a run. Master's went 
on to win 5-0. 

The losses dropped the Regals to 2-7 
overall, while Master's improved to 14-3. 
CLU vs. Occidental 

The Cal Lutheran Softball team defeat- 
ed SCIAC rival Occidental 6-1 last Friday 
in Los Angeles. 

The Regals broke the game open in the 
fifth scoring five runs, then added an insur- 
ance run in the sixth. 

Occidental came up with just one run 
thanks to a brilliant pitching performance 
from Olivia Chacon who surrendered just 



one hit and one earned run. 

Erin Neuhaus scored two runs for the 
Regals while Olivia Chacon showed off 
her offensive skills with two hits and an 
RBI. 

"I think we're going to be okay," man- 
ager Debbie Day said. "We've had some 
setbacks, but everything seems to be mov- 
ing in the right direction." 

The Regals split a doubleheader with 
Occidental on Saturday, winning the first 
game, 2-0, and losing the second, 2-1. 

Chelsea Barrella hit a double in the 
fourth inning of the first inning, set- 
ting up the Regals first run. Esmeralda 
Macias came in as the pinch runner, and 
was brought in by a single from Amanda 
DeFusco. 

Carrie Mitchell got on base thanks to 
a fielding error in the fifth, and eventually 
scored on a single by Heidi Miller. DeFus- 
co, Mitchell and Neuhaus all had two hits. 

Neuhaus pitched a complete game, al- 



lowing just three hits as she picked up the 
win for Cal Lutheran. 

The Regals only run in the second 
game came in the fourth inning, when 
Christa Galier knocked in Barrella with a 
single. 

The Regals only other significant scor- 
ing chance came in the first inning when 
they had the bases loaded but failed to 
bring a runner home. The Tigers tallied 
up a run in the first and the third to clinch 
the win. 

"We lost our fire in that second game," 
manager Debbie Day said after Saturday's 
doubleheader. "No one stood up and took 
charge and the win slipped away. We can't 
let that happen if we want to be success- 
ful." 
Up Next 

The Regals will head to the Sun West 
Tournament in Orange to face Chapman 
and Cabrini, March 5. Conference play 
continues against CMS this weekend. 



Track and Field Results Tennis teams shut out 

Dual Meet v. CMS & La Verne L eopards 

it8 



Redlands - March 1 



By Victor Esquer 
Staff Writer 



'Regals beat Redlands and lost to 
CMS. Kingsmen lost to both teams. 

"Leah Bingman posted the second 
best time so far this year in SCIAC with 
her 16.9 100H. 

"Lauren Mooney PRed in the 100m 
hurdles, finishing in 17.54. 

"Dereem McKinney took first place 
in the high jump, leaping 4'10", the 
sixth best place in SCIAC. Her third 
place triple jump was good for seventh 
in SCIAC. 

"Ashleigh Poulin took third in the 
pole vault with 9'. 

"Grant Kincade is among the top 
ten in SCIAC in four events. On Sat- 
urday he placed second in the 110m 
hurdles, finishing in 15.98 for the third 
spot in conference. He is also ranked 
in the 400m hurdles, high jump and 
triple jump. 

"Cory Hughes has the ninth best 
distance in SCIAC this year. He threw 
149'05" on Saturday for a season best, 
finishing in seventh place. 

"Adrian Cruz has the tenth best 
throw in the hammer this year. He 



threw for eight place with 10T05" on 
Saturday. He also PRed in the discus 
with a toss of 108'06". 

"Brent Baier also PRed in the dis- 
cus, throwing 100'02". 

"Chris Hauser is ranked No. 9 in 
the hammer. His was the sixth farthest 
throw on Saturday with 116'. 

"Tom Ham returned from a broken 
foot to participate in the 800m, 1500m 
and 5000m. 

"Heather Worden is ranked eighth 
in the 1500m. On Saturday she ran for 
fourth place with a time of 5:11. 

"In the 800m, Worden got sixth 
place in 2:35 and teammate Katy 
Svennegsen finished four seconds 
later for eighth place. 

"Amanda Klever and Courtney 
Parks finished just five seconds apart 
in the 5000m race. Klever ran for 
eighth in 20.54 and Parks finished in 
20:59 for ninth place. 

"Emma Holman has the third fast- 
est time this season in the 3000m 
steeplechase. Her 12:44 race on Sat- 
urday earned her second place. 



The men and women's tennis teams 
maintained their winning ways by shutting 
out La Verne this weekend. 
Kingsmen vs. La Verne 

The men's tennis team bounced back 
after suffering their first loss of the season 
last week against Claremont and trounced 
La Verne, 7-0. Amir Marandy kept his 
perfect season alive and defeated Chad 
Rodriguez (6-0, 6-1) with ease in the 
No. I singles match. Arif Hasan defeated 
Jason Cortez 6-4, 6-4 in the No. 2 singles 
match. In the No. 3 and 4 singles matches 
Junya Hasebe and Quinn Calderon won 
their matches easily and in the No. 5 and 
6 matches Jeremey Quinlan and Karlo 
Arapovic shut out their opponents, 6-0 in 
straight sets. The Kingsmen did not lose 
any sets in the match. Marandy and Hasan 
also won in their No. 1 doubles match by 
defeating Rodriguez and Cortez. 

"We're hot right now; Amir is playing 
awesome and as a whole, we're really fo- 
cused on winning SCIAC," said Hasan. 
Regals vs. La Verne 

The shutout of La Veme moved 
the Kingsmen to 5-1 overall and 4-1 in 



*i| 








photographs courtesy of Cory Hughes 
(L) Lauren Mooney hands off the baton to Jaquie Ramierez in the 4xl00tnrace. 
(R) Denise French in the 4x100m. 




photograph by Marku 
Blair Murphy secured a win at No. 3 against the Lady Leos. 



pliolugr;ipfi h> Murkus Rank. 

Rebecca Hunau teamed up with Lisa 
Novojosky to win the No. I doubles match, 
then went on to claim the No 1 singles 
victor)' os well. 
SCIAC. 

The women's tennis team is still hot 
and remained undefeated by shutting out 
La Verne, 9-0. Becca Hunau had no 
problem defeating Lacy Cascadden as she 
downed her (6-0, 
6-1), in the No. 
I singles match. 
Hunau and Lisa 
Novajosky then 
teamed up in the 
No. I doubles and 
smashed Cascad- 
den and Michelle 
Fontanez, 8-1. 

The Regals did 
not lose any sets in 
the match. Hunau 
loves the way her 
team is playing 
right now. 

"We are as 
focused and as 
confident as we've 
ever been, we just 
need to continue to 
improve and keep 
working hard," said 
Hunau. 

The win moved 
the Regals to 5-0 
overall. 



12 The Echo 



Sports 



Sportsm anship speaker 



By Alex Espinoza 
Stam- Writer 



Students and faculty gathered to hear 
Dan Doyle give a lecture on "Sportsman- 
ship and Honorable Competition" at Cali- 
fornia Lutheran University's Samuelson 
Chapel on Monday, Feb. 24, at 10 a.m. 

In his lecture, Doyle, Executive Direc- 
tor of the Institute of International Sports, 
talked about the importance of sports and 
the values which scholar-athletes take from 
them. 

"I believe that there are many values 
and lessons learned from participating in 
sports. The sports experience is very valu- 
able because it teaches life lessons," said 
Doyle. 

One of the lessons he talked about 
was how to handle winning and losing. 
He talked about how winning can produce 
self-confidence, appreciation and the value 
of teamwork. 

"Success isn't built on success, but 
failure. A lot can be learned from both 
winning and losing." said Doyle. 

He pointed out that many of the people 
at the top of their professions today were 
once, in fact, scholar-athletes. He believes 
that young people can be brought together 
through the power of sport as a median. 
Scholar-athletes are learning important les- 
sons through sports, which will aid them in 
becoming future leaders 

Doyle is also very active in a pro- 
gram that brings scholar-athletes from all 
over the world together called The World 




photograph by Rebecca Hunau 
Executive Director of International Sports Dan Doyle speaks in Samuelson Chapel last 
Monday about Sportsmanship in competition to a group ofCL U students and faculty. 



Scholar-Athlete Games. The program 
was started in 1993 as a celebration of the 
scholar-athlete. 

"We want to praise and honor the 
scholar-athlete with this program. I have a 
lot of respect for these students, especially 
for the Division-ill scholar-athletes," said 
Doyle. 

He also stressed the idea of being an 
honorable competitor. This consists of a 
commitment to fair play, a fit for life phi- 



losophy and competitive self-restraint. 

Doyle ended the lecture by passing out 
T-shirts and a few words of advice. 

"In both life and sports you can either 
be a victim or you can rise above your 
challenges. When that time comes don't 
throw in the towel; pick it up," said Doyle. 

For more information on Dan Doyle 
and his programs go to 
www.internationalsports.com. 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 



Indoor Soccer Playoff Schedule 

Sunday, March 9 

7 p.m. Hardwood Starz vs. Panda Express 

8 p.m. His Whole Life vs. Score 

9 p.m. XBA vs. Winner of 7 p.m. game 

CHAMPIONSHIP GAME 

Thursday, March 13 at 9 p.m. 
Winner of Sunday's 8 p.m. game vs. Winner of 9 p.m. game 



InTRnmuRHL Soccer 
SiflnDiiiGs (us of 3.3) 



XBfl 


6-0 


SCORE 


5-1 


HIS WHOLE LIFE 


4-1 


HARDWOOD STflRZ 3-2 


PHIIDfl EXPRESS 


3-2 


mnC ATTACK 


3-2 


THERAPISTS 


3-3 


DOR 


3-3 


CHIURS 


2-4 


EAGLES 


1-5 


REEBS 


1-5 


JUnRVARD DOGS 


0-6 



SOFTBALL 
STANDINGS 

Pink Bunny Rabbits 1-0 (22) 

Soiland 1-0 (15) 

Holy Hitters 1-0 (15) 

Fo Sho Fo Sho 1-0 (14) 

Field Stompers 1-0 (12) 

Bogards 1-0 (10) 

Tools - 1-0 (7) 

Dirty South 1-0 (11) 

Weekend Warriors 0-1 (12) 
Your Grandpa's Daughter 0-1 (9) 

Coconut Crushers 0-1 (7) 

Hot Potates 0-1 (5) 

Utah Jamz 0-1 (4) 

Big Purple Machine 0-1 (3) 



Indoor Soccer 
ALL-STARS 

Micah Scultz-Akerson 

Jake Card 

Laura O'Neill 

Brionna Morse 

KlINIMASA KlTAZAMA 

Matt White 

Josh West 

Ryan Quinn 

Alex Espinosa 

Mike Alexander 

Autumn Saenz 

Rose Tony 

Alfonso Rodriguez 

Prentice Reedy 

Kris Johnson 



March 3, 2003 



this week's 

Kingsmen & 

Regals action 



Today, March 5 

-softball at Sun West 
Tournament, Chapman 

Thursday, March 6 

-baseball v. Bridgewater 
College (VA) 2:30 p.m. 

Friday, March 7 

-baseball v. Pomona- 
Pitzer 2:30 p.m. 
-softball v. CMS 3 p.m. 

Saturday, March 8 

-Knights Rugby 1 p.m. 
-track at Cal Tech 
v. Cal Tech & ULV 
-m tennis at 
UC Santa Cruz 
-softball at CMS 
-baseball at Pomona- 
Pitzer 

Sunday, March 9 

-m tennis at UCSC, v. 
Emory University (GA) 

Monday, March 10 

-golf at UC San Diego 
Invitational 

Tuesday, March 11 

-golf at UC San Diego 
Invitational 
-softball at Sun West 
Tournament, Chapman 
-m tennis v. Mary 
Washington University 
(VA)2p.m. 

home games indicated by italics 



Softball Schedule - March 9 

10 a.m. - Hang Ten v. Field Stompers 

11 a.m. - Your Grandpa's Daughter v. Pink Bunny Rabbits 
noon - #1 Stunnaz v. Dogs with Legs 

1 p.m. - The Tools v. Coconut Crushers 

2 p.m. - Utah Jamz v. Daryl Strawberry's 3rd Strike 

3 p.m. - Dirty South v. Holy Hitters 

4 p.m. - Soiland v. John Morse 



SOFTBALL ALL-STARS 

Aaron Hehe * Rob Simmons * Jon Oakman * Vic Esquer * Josh West * Tyler Ruiz * Steve perry * Cesar Cost ales * Eric Davis 
Robby Larson * Greg Greir * Micah - Schultz-Akerson * Dean Klipfel * Pete West 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 43, No. 18 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91 360 



March 12, 2003 



Sports 

Rugby learn wins 
home game. 



See story page 10 



Features 

CLU students reach out 
to make a difference. 



See story page 7 



News 

Debate continues in 
the Senate over 
diploma issues. 



See story page 4 



FAFSA deadline looms 



By Heather Ladwig 
Staff Writer 



This time of year comes and goes so 
quickly with students struggling to com- 
plete midterms, graduation information 
and application deadlines. 

One of the most important aspects of 
spring semester most students overlook is 
the FAFSA preferred deadline of April 1, 
and other Financial Aid applications. 

The FAFSA form is most likely the 
most important of the financial aid forms 
because it allows other types of aid such 
as work study, gift aid, students loans and 
scholarships to be sufficiently awarded. At 
California Lutheran University there are 
many different types of aid in which many 
students are not aware. 

An Academic Merit is awarded at 
admission that can range anywhere from 
$2,000 to $10,000. 



The Presidential Scholarships and Vi- 
sual & Performing Arts Scholarships have 
deadlines between January and February 
and can award anywhere from $500 to 
$8,600, depending on which type of schol- 
arship is awarded. The Cal Grants (Type 
A) are available when students file their 
FAFSA form; however, students must also 
file a GPA Verification sheet by March 2 to 
be eligible. 

"Our web site has a lot of informa- 
tion that would be helpful to the students. 
The URL for the page is www.clunet.edu/ 
FinancialAid," said CLU's Director of Fi- 
nancial Aid, Nancy Davis. 

Every year students must re-apply for 
financial aid by filing the renewal FAFSA. 
The renewal FAFSA is less time consuming 
than the very first one the students fill out 
their freshman year. The FAFSA form can 
be submitted anytime from Jan. 1 through 
the spring semester. Because financial aid 
is given out from the middle of March to 



early April, CLU is asking students to set a 
deadline of at least April 1 for themselves. 
The results of the student's individual 
analysis should be sent to CLU using code 
#001 133. By filing a FAFSA, more than 80 
percent of CLU students will receive some 
type of financial aid each year. 

"We just sent out an e-mail and paper 
copy of a notice asking students to apply 
by April 1 for financial aid because of the 
lack of money. In order to receive the max- 
imum amount of money it is crucial that 
students meet this deadline," Davis said. 

The annual approximated cost for the 
2002-2003 school year at CLU is $29, 997. 
With an approximated cost of $19,050 for 
tuition, $6,920 for room and board, $200 
for additional fees and each person's book 
bill, the average CLU students must have 
some type of financial aid. 

Not every student is able to find suffi- 
cient funds for financial aid at CLU. Senior 
English major Cyndy Murphy transferred 



to CLU last fall, from the University of 
California at Santa Cruz, and found great 
difficulty finding aid at CLU. 

"Here at CLU, it is nice that we have 
such great access to people within the 
financial aid office. On the other hand, 
the school does not distribute our checks 
until after the add/drop date for classes," 
Murphy said. "I was really blessed this 
semester with getting $5 for book money, 
considering my books cost around $300." 

The very true aspect of the financial 
aid process is that everything costs some- 
thing. It is time consuming to complete the 
forms and applications for financial aid, 
making sure everything is in line for the 
following year, but it pays off in the end. 
The financial aid office is willing to answer 
any questions students may have. 

Students should also look at the web 
site suggested above for any further infor- 
mation. 



Ethics promote successful business 



By Heather Hoyt 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University's 33rd 
Annual Mathews Leadership Forum titled 
"Ethics and Leadership: Moving Beyond 
Enron" was held last Thursday evening. 

Over 300 people packed into the Gym 
to listen to Jack Stack, president of SRC 
Holdings Corp. and a proponent of open- 
book management. 

He served as keynote speaker with a 
focus on the ethics and leadership issues 
America faces after the series of corporate 
scandals that rocked the nation. 

The forum brought together students 
and faculty with local civic and business 
leaders for roundtable discussions before 
dinner. 

"It was interesting to hear what no- 
table people from the community had to 
say about the issues we were discussing at 
the roundtable," said Courtney Parks, a ju- 
nior marketing and communication major, 
who sat at a table with two people from the 
medical field and an employee of Amgen. 



"I didn't know that Amgen was such a 
huge part of our community," Parks said. 

As a businessman, Stack has been rec- 
ognized for his professional accomplish- 
ments, as well as his contributions to the 
quality of life in his community. 

Along with commending SRC. Inc. 
Magazine called Stack "the smartest strate- 
gist in America." Similarly, Fortune Small 
Business listed him among the "top 10 
minds in small business" in 2002. 

A national judge for the Emst & Young 
Entrepreneur of the Year Awards Institute 
since 1998, Stack also serves on the board 
of Citibank Corp. and is extremely in- 
volved in the Springfield, Mo. community 
where SRC is based. 

"It was cool to listen to someone who 
has so much power," said Karin Pichel, a 
sophomore and psychology major. 

Many people at the Forum had attend- 
ed previous Mathews Leadership Forums. 
After attending the last three forums, junior 
economics major Josh Kramer said, "This 
has been the best [Mathews Leadership 
Forum] so far." 




Photograph by Neal Lembke 
Jack Stack, president of SRC Holdings Corp.. spoke to students, faculty and members of 
the community about the importance of the ethics in business. 



Spring Formal to be held at Paradise Pier Hotel 



By Jennifer Pfautch 
Staff Writer 



Most college students will laugh if 
asked if they miss high school; however, 
believe it or not. there is one aspect of the 
high school experience that college lacks. 
It is the school-sponsored excuse to get 
dressed up, hang out with friends and party 
without it being a holiday. 

Formal dances do not come along very 
often for most college studnets. 

"I expect it be really enjoyable and the 



best formal we've had," said Elissa Jordan, 
social activities representative. 

On April 12 California Lutheran Uni- 
versity students will converge at the Para- 
dise Pier hotel in the Disneyland Resort. 
The resort is located in Anaheim, Calif, 
approximately one and a half hours from 
CLU. 

"Tickets for the spring formal will cost 
$30 per person and will included a three 
course dinner and dancing," said Emily 
Holden. Programs Board director. 

Students have the option of purchasing 
a ticket to Disneyland or Disney's Califor- 



nia Adventure at a discounted price of $40, 
to be used on Sunday, April 1 3. In the past, 
the spring formal has been held at numer- 
ous places, and, based on the attendance 
when the dance was held at Disneyland 
in the past, it is one of the student body's 
favorites, Jordan said. 

"I think it is the appeal of Anaheim and 
the whole town," Jordan said. 

The Programs Board believes that 
many students will want to stay overnight 
near the resort to avoid driving back to 
CLU, so Jordan put together a book with a 
listing of hotels and the discounts available 



for students. 

The book is kept at the information 
desk in the Student Union Building for 
those who are interested. 

Nichole Hackbarth. ASCLU president 
gives Jordan the credit. 

"She's actually the one planning it, and 
she planned homecoming too," Hackbarth 
said. 

"We have a really great deejay, which 
has been a problem in the past, so I'm re- 
ally excited about that." Jordan said. 

Tickets for spring formal are on sale 
in the SUB. 



2 The Echo 



Calendar 



March 12.2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 




today 

march 12 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 

Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel 
9:11 p.m. 

thursday 

march 13 

Drama Capstone Scenes 

P/B Forum 
8 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 

Gym 
8 p.m. 




The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 

friday 

march 14 

Drama Capstone Scenes 

P/B Forum 

8 p.m. 

Club Lu: CLW 

Gym 

9 p.m. 

Saturday 

march 15 



Drama Capstone Scenes 

P/B Forum 
8 p.m. 



*> 




Sunday 

march 16 



Intramural Softball 

Gibello Softball Fiel 
8 a.m. 

Drama 

P/B Forum 
2 p.m. 

Church 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 



Intramural Basketball 

Gym 
8 p.m. 

monday 

march 17 




Accounting Association 

Peters 101 
6 p.m. 

ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
6:30 p.m. 



ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
8:30 p.m. 



y 



^ 






tuesday 

march 18 



Sister Friends 

Chapel Lounge 
5:15 p.m. 



\ I"" ', 

r 
I 






u 



Wear your Green for St. Patty 's Day!.'! 

ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 2 

5:15 p.m. 



Asian Club and Friends 

Pederson Lounge 
6 p.m. 

Bible Study // ~~\ 

Chapel Lounge ' L \ 



8 p.m. 



classifieds 



Tutors Wanted: ACE Educational 
Services is looking for bright, enthusiastic, 
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starts al $15-20/hr. Transportation required. 
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ACE Educational Services 

ATTN: instructor Hiring 

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fax: (310) 282-6424 

email: 

instructorhiring@accedueation.com 



Summer Day Camp Help Needed: 

Seeking General Counselors & Specialist 

Instructors. Located just 20 minutes from 

CLU. Staff can earn $2800-3500+ for the 

summer working w/ children outdoors! 

If interested, call: 

(888)784-CAMPor 

visit: www.workatcamp.com 



Work From Home: Do you have a 
nose for business? Need money? Work 
from home! We train you. Order our free 
booklet. 

If interested, call or email: 

(888) 872-4446 

www.successlifestyles4u.com 

Classified ads can be placed on 

the Calendar page for a flat rate 

regardless of word count. Discount 

available for multiple issue orders. 

Ads are subject to editing for content 

& clarity. 

Call: 

(805) 493-3865 



When was the last time you scrubbed your bathroom toilet, 

removed the mold from your bathroom ceiling or scrubbed 

the dried hairspray layers from the bathroom counter? 

When was the last time you mopped your kitchen floor, 

cleared the grease from your stove or removed the old 

food that now sticks to your kitchen sink? 

Well, if you still haven't managed to do it, think about 
hiring Marriott Services to help you out. 

The Apartments and Kramer residents could have their bath- 
room and kitchen cleaned twice a month for $75/month 
and 
All other dormitories could have their bathrooms cleaned twice 
a month for $50/month. 



• A 



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Cut aloni> the dotted fine 



Do you think those arc reasonable prices? 

If not, tell us a reasonable price for ... 
The Apartments and Kramer 

All other dormitories 

Fill in, cut this out and mail to the ECHO at mailbox #3650 



The Math Lab at California 



Lutheran University 

Why pay high prices for private 

math tutors when you can get 

tutored for free? 

At the Math Lab we offer FREE 

tutoring for all math from basic 

Algebra to Calculus and beyond! 

Our location is in the F building 
room 10, in between the Ed/Tech 
center and the D building. Our 
hours are always Sunday through 
Thursday from 7-10 p.m. 

We have laptops available for use. 
The tutors are friendly AND cool! 
Please take advantage of our 
services!! Come to get tutored, 
study or just hang out! 



Improve your test scores NOW!! 



fa 




Questions? 
Contact Dr. Garcia at X3276 



Join the College Democrats of CLU at the 

California Democratic Party Convention! 



You don't need to be a member to attend! 
March 14*" Iff*. Friday - Sundav 



(We're leaving 1:30pm Friday afternoon and will be back Sunday evening) 

*It hosts elections for California Young Democrats [CYD] & California College Democrats [CCD], which will have sessions you can sit in on. 

'Elected Officials will be there, including Gov. Gray Davis. The Gov. will be having a reception on Friday night, and the CDP will throw a party 

Saturday night! 

*Most cost will be covered, and pass fee can be waived if you volunteer to do check-in. 

*If you are even slightly interested or have any questions, please don't hesitate to contact me. Mady Stacy by: 



"Dorm: (805) 241-2336 

'Email: FandMad » aol.com 



♦Cell: (209) 679-2312 
"Room: North 1016. back of 3 ,J floor 



March 12,2003 



News 



The Echo 3 



Donations fuel athletics 



By Mark Glesne 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University is get- 
ting closer to reaching its goal for the $80 
million campaign. 

Recent donations by the CLU Com- 
munity Leaders Association and a former 
pro football player, Daniel Villanueva, 
have moved CLU $150,000 closer to its 
financial objective. 

The CLU Community Leaders Asso- 
ciation has pledged $50,000 to the CLU 
North Campus athletics facilities. Since its 
foundation in 1963, this organization has 
granted more than $1 .5 million to Cal Lu's 
academic programs through scholarships 
and equipment. The second floor mezza- 
nine will be named after the association in 
recognition of the gift. 

"Community Leaders Association is 
proud to play a role in bringing this new fa- 
cility to the CLU community," said Debbie 
Hang, former president of the association. 
"The Sports and Fitness Center will offer 
many opportunities to every student." 

Villanueva, a former television ex- 
ecutive and NFL player for both the L.A. 
Rams and Dallas Cowboys, has given a 
$100,000 gift to CLU. 

The money will be used in the build- 




Photograph courtesy of Public Information 
Proposed rendering ofCLU's new North Campus athletic facilities. This drawing shows 
the northwest view of the $80 million structure. 



ing of its 1 ,000-seat soccer stadium on the 
university's north campus project. This is 
the first major gift given to Cal Lu specifi- 
cally for the soccer complex. 



"Soccer is the fastest growing sport in 
America," Villanueva said. "My goal is to 
provide sports opportunities for our young 
people, especially those in undeserved 



communities. 1 am proud to be a part of 
Cal Lutheran's effort to provide these op- 
portunities." 

The North Campus athletics facilities 
will be a five to 10 year building program 
that will cover 80 acres north of Olsen 
Road. The soccer complex and fitness cen- 
ter will be part of Phase 1. 

In 2005, CLU plans on opening the 
96,000 square foot, two story Sports and 
Fitness Center. 

Also included in the project's first 
phase will be facilities for baseball, aquat- 
ics and soccer, practice fields and on-site 
parking. 

The baseball facility, which will hold 
300 seats, will be named in honor of former 
major league manager Sparky Anderson. 

The sports center itself will include a 
1,500-seat gymnasium (The Jack Gilbert 
Arena), a second practice gym, events 
center, classrooms and labs, fitness center, 
dance and aerobics studio, sports medicine 
facility, offices for faculty and coaches and 
an alumni association Hall of Fame. 

Also to be constructed will be an 
outdoor aquatic center with an olympic- 
sized pool, diving well and diving boards. 
CLU students will be able to compete at 
the intercollegiate and intramural levels in 
swimming, diving and water polo upon the 
completion of the facilities. 



Sibling rivalries settled by mini golf 



By Gianina Lomedico 
Staff "Writer 



Freshman Jennifer Fenske and her 
sister, 17-year-old Heather Fenske, both 
found out that timing is everything when 
miniature golfing at Golf N' Stuff in 
Ventura, Calif., for California Lutheran 
University's Club Lu event on Friday, 
March 7. 

In this case, the obstacle to face is a 
pole above Hole 17. The key is to swing 
the pole gently and putt the golf ball when 
the pole is away from the hole. Each time 
they would hit the ball, the pole would 
come charging and hitting their ball. 

"The event was fun because we 
haven't done miniature golfing in a long 
time," Jennifer Fenske said. "It is nice 
that my family can come to visit me for a 
change, instead of going to visit them." 

About 220 CLU students and 60 sib- 
lings came to play free miniature golf to 
start Siblings Weekend. Each student or 
sibling received a group activity ticket 
which included golf, four free tokens for 
video games and one ride ticket. Golf N' 
Stuff also had bumper boats and cars, Indy 
race cars and a video game center. 

"I think the event went well and people 



had fun." said Senior RHA Recorder Hana 
Albarran. "We had more CLU students 
than we had tickets, so other students had 
to buy their own tickets. The lines for golf- 
ing took a little while." 

The video game center included games 
such as pinball, foosball, skee ball and air 
hockey. Video games like "Dance Dance 
Revolution Extreme," "Drum Mania Mix," 
"X-men" and "World Series Baseball" 
were in the center. It also included classic 
games from the 80s like "Donkey Kong," 
"Pac-Man," "Centipede" and "Let's Go 
Bowling." 

Students and siblings were also able to 
buy snacks in the center. They had a choice 
of pizza, nachos, ice cream, pretzels, pop- 
corn, hot-dogs, chips and candy. Drinks 
included hot chocolate and other types of 
refreshments. 

Junior John LaThorp said that it was a 
fun night out. 

"The event was a nice change and a 
break from a really long, tiring week," said 
LaThorp, who is an English major. 

Sophomore Pete West also said that 
the event went well. 

"It was great being able to play a round 
of miniature golf with my friends," said 
West, a liberal arts major. 




Photograph by Summer Scarborough 

(From left to right) Students at GolfN 'Stuff last Friday night. The Club Lu event started 
off the weekend for students and their siblings. 



Programs Board plans movie night, "Lu Down'' 



By Christa Hudson 
Staff Writer 



The Programs Board continues to 
face difficulties planning a student movie 
night. 

"We are having trouble picking which 
way of doing it, last year's way or trying 
something new. We decided no on the Simi 
Valley theatre," said programs board mem- 
ber Heather Ladwig. 

There has been much capriciousness 
about movie night's location and content 
of events. 



"We may end up buying 150 tickets 
to one movie and 150 tickets to another 
movie at the Janss Mall," Ladwig said. 

Last year's movie night was conducted 
at the Janss Mall where free tickets were 
given out to CLU students. 

The cost for the mechanical bull for 
the Lu Down reaches new heights. "The 
mechincal bull will cost $1,200, but I'm 
going to look for a better deal," said pro- 
gram member Jackie Oshann. 

Other alternative locations are being 
considered. Borderline, one alternative, is 
a country western club located in Thou- 
sand Oaks, Calif. 



"We will meet with coordinator to see 
what deal they will give us. The university 
has hosted other events there but never 
rented out the entire place exclusively for 
CLU," said programs board member Yuri 
Perez. 

CLW, California Lutheran Wrestling, 
is much anticipated by programs mem- 
bers. 

"We are excited. Everything is ready 
for CLW and the T-shirts go on sale Mon- 
day night." Jonea Boysen said. 

Jimmy Fox came up with the concept 
of CLW. CLW follows the same partem as 
pro wrestling. 



"The moves are real, but the wrestlers 
know what is going to happen and who is 
going to win," Fox said. The event will 
last approximately two hours and wrestling 
characters such as "The Island Child" and 
"Kid Kaos" will be performing. 

"I came up with a lot of the characters, 
but a bunch of the guys came up with their 
own names and characters," Fox said. 

Programs Board decided on a theme 
for spring formal. 

"The theme is going to be 'A night of 
magic,'" Elissa Jordan said. 

Please see P.B. plans, p. 4 



4 The Echo 



News 



Siblings come to CLU 



March 12.2003 



By Jessica Laufman 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran University 
campus was host to many young visitors 
from March 7-9 during Siblings Weekend. 
Nearly 115 registered siblings reunited 
with their Cal Lutheran brother or sister for 
the weekend. The weekend began with the 
Club Lu on Friday night at Golf N' Stuf" 
where students and siblings could interact 
with each other by playing miniature golf 
and video games. Saturday started off with 
a sibling's breakfast in the SUB. followed 
by the Kid Olympics and lunch in the park. 



Kid Olympics was a downscaled version 
of the Wacky Wild Hall Olympics that was 
held later in the afternoon. Siblings had the 
opportunity to compete in events such as a 
water balloon toss and a tricycle race. 

Freshmen Katie St. Piere had four 
people visiting her during the weekend, 
including her two younger teenage sisters 
and two neighbors from her hometown of 
Bakersfield, Calif. 

St. Piere said her visitors really en- 
joyed spending their time together at the 
beach and attending the Golf N' Stuff 
event. 

"I never get to see my family; it was 



really fun to hang out with them again," St. 
Piere said. 

Saturday concluded with karaoke and 
ice cream sundaes in the SUB from 7-10 
p.m. Students and siblings young and old 
took the stage singing many genres of 
music. 

Freshmen Kelly Jones was a spectator 
of the karaoke and said she was very enter- 
tained by some of the younger performers. 

"My favorite performance was the two 
little girls singing the Disney song 'Beauty 
and the Beast." They were so adorable," 
Jones said. 

RHA member Bobbi Jo Cyr enjoyed 



watching students and their siblings inter- 
act; she was pleased to see older students 
caring for younger children. 

"It was really cute seeing big guys on 
campus walking around with little kids," 
Cyr said. 

Brunch in the Caf took place on Sun- 
day at 9 a.m., followed by the departure of 
the siblings at approximately 1 1 a.m. 

Student Hara Albarran had her 7-year- 
old niece visit instead of a sibling. She re- 
ally enjoyed the quality time that they got 
to spend together. 

"Just having her here was the highlight 
of the weekend," Albarran said. 



Intense diploma debates continue in Senate 



By Brandee Tecson 
Staff Writer 



The Senate continued heated discus- 
sion of the diploma issue brought up at last 
Monday night's meeting. 

"This is an item that is of very signifi- 
cant interest to students," said Senate Ad- 
visor Bill Rosser. "It's something Senate 
has been very much been a part of." 

Last year, complaints were received 
from several graduates who were disap- 
pointed with the quality of the diplomas 
they received in the mail. 

Senate is now in negotiation to fund 
the money to get the necessary changes 
made for new diplomas. 

"At the last diploma meeting, it was 
discussed that they would be willing to 
discard [old diplomas] and create the new 
ones as long as they were given the fund- 
ing," said Senate Director Kristin Smith. 



"The problem is that they need the money 
by March 13." 

The approximate cost to fund the 
changes is between $7,000 and $10,000. 
A final decision must be made by the next 
Senate meeting on March 10 and will be 
discussed at a Cabinet meeting on March 
11. 

One of the main problems is that the 
school's operational budget is much tighter 
this year than most, said Rosser. 

Rosser allotted much of the decline to 
the drop in the stock market as well as the 
rise in student financial aid and scholar- 
ships. 

However, if the funds are made avail- 
able, the change in diplomas will be ef- 
fective immediately, affecting this year's 
graduating seniors and the next four gradu- 
ating classes to come. 

Freshman Kacey Brackney believes 
that the diplomas should not have been an 
issue in the first place. 



"The school should have taken enough 
pride in their graduates to give them a 
high-quality diploma," Brackney said. 
"Now, they're asking us to pay them to 
have that pride in [our school]." 

Despite the tense atmosphere, sopho- 
more Kellie Kocher suggested having the 
diplomas paid for as the senior gift. 

Sophomore Dominic Storelli was one 
of the senators who opposed the idea. 

"I'm fully for the change," Storelli 
said. "But I don't know how many people 
that are seniors will complain. If it's not 
taken care of this year, the money will roll- 
over and will most likely be taken care of 
next year." 

Senior Natalie Roberts believes 
Storelli's view is not the right way to look 
at the issue. 

"I think it's really wrong to short- 
change one class, whether it's your own 
or not, to say, 'we're going to ignore this 
issue because in a year it will be taken care 



of This is an issue now," Roberts said. "It 
would be like cheating ourselves." 

Roberts is among several senators who 
believe the matter should be taken care of 
as quickly as possible. 

"When most people looked at [a sam- 
ple of the diploma], they were really disap- 
pointed," said Roberts, an at-large senator. 
"It's just not acceptable." 

Discussion also turned to complaints 
about supplementary graduation fees in 
addition to the $26,000 annual tuition al- 
ready paid by students. Many students feel 
that these fees should have already been 
incorporated into tuition. 

"What you actually pay to graduate, 
for your cap and gown, your invitations, 
your graduation fee and your frame, is 
$250," senior Christa Hudson said. "By 
the time you graduate, if you don't get the 
degree that you want, you're going to be so 
bitter at this school that you just won't care 
anymore." 



Phone-a-thon raises money for CLU education 



By Tina Sterling 
Guest Writer 



A phone-a-thon takes place every Sun- 
day through Thursday from 5:30 p.m. to 8: 
30 p.m. in room 209 of the administration 
building. The outgoing calls are made by 
18 to 20 undergraduate California Luther- 
an University students. The phone-a-thon 
began Feb. 9 and lasts until March 14. 

The overall goal is to get $60,000 in 
pledges from alumni, past donors, parents 
of alumni or anyone associated with CLU. 
Each night, the students call anywhere 
from 300 to 400 people in the school's 

P.B. plans 

continued from p, 3 

Additionally, if CLU students wish to 
partake. Programs Board has negotiated 
with Disneyland park to secure discounted 
ticket prices for CLU students. 

"Students need to have the money for 
the park ticket when they buy the tickets to 
the dance," Jordan said. 

Tickets can be purchased for the park 
for $40. 

Spring formal will be held at Disney's 
Paradise Pier Hotel at the Disneyland Re- 
sort. Dinner will be served at 8 p.m. 

During the meeting, the Programs 
Board approved the appointment of junior 
Kaja Odegard to the position of recorder 
by a vote of 15-0-0. 



system who are listed as alumni or friends 
of the university. The money raised by the 
campaign helps to cover the 1 5 percent dif- 
ference between the price of tuition here 
and the actual cost of a CLU education. 

Some of the enrichments the money 
contributes to are the 16:1 faculty-student 
ratio, the Internet hook-ups for every stu- 
dent in the residence halls and the financial 
aid that is awarded to over 80 percent of 
the student population. 

"We're going great. We're ahead of 
schedule so far, meeting our nightly goals 
every night with the exception of only one 
[night] when we were short $40. Other 
than that, the students have done a great 



job," said Michelle Spurgeon, the assistant 
director of Annual Giving. The nightly 
goal is $2,800. 

The phone-a-thon allows the students 
to use the hours spent calling as part of 
work study, where they can pay off part of 
their tuition by working on campus. 

"I like working the phones at the 
phone-a-thon. Even though sometimes it's 
repetitive just calling people, it's pretty 
easy and I'm making money at the same 
time," said Lindsey Rothbaum, a freshman 
who works the telethon every night. 

Vanessa Majsztrik. a junior, thinks 
highly of the fundraiser. 

"I think it's a great cause. I get some 



financial aid from the school and knowing 
that some of the money comes from alumni 
and people who want to help us with our 
education is touching," Majsztrik said. 

Bonuses are offered to the students 
for getting someone to pledge that has not 
done so in the past. 

Dinners are provided to the students 
two of the five nights during the week, and 
as an incentive, if the students raise the 
money before 8:30 p:m., they are allowed 
to leave early. 

"Every night, everyone really works at 
reaching our goal before 8 o'clock so we 
can get to our room to see 'The Bachelor- 
ette' or 'American Idol,'" Rothbaum said. 



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Features 



March 12, 2003 



The Echo 5 



Two CLU student interns 
help local child with autism 



By Trevor Kelley 
Staff writer 



"These girls are amazing," said 
Ventura County-based mother of one, 
Jennifer McNulty "They've made such a 
difference in my son." 

McNulty is referring to two CLU stu- 
dents: 22-year-old senior Johanna Hals 
and 20-year-old junior Elissa Jordan. 
Both students have volunteered as interns 
to help McNulty with the development of 
Kyle, her five-year-old son who is being 
treated through a program called LIFE 
(Lovaas Institute For Early Intervention) 



for autism. In as short as five months 
worth of help from Hals, Jordan and the 
boy's lead therapist, Felice Brock, young 
Kyle has shown remarkable improve- 
ment. 

"When we started he had very little 
verbal skills and very little compliance," 
Hals said. "I love working with kids and I 
really wanted to help this little boy — and 
now he's improved." 

"It's really turned his development 
around," McNulty agreed. "He's making 
wonderful progress. It's amazing to see." 

Help from people like Hals and Jor- 
dan was something the McNultys were 
in dire need of. Ventura County, though 



a reliable community in many aspects of 
life, hardly provides the sort of necessary 
care for special children like Kyle. In 
Thousand Oaks, for instance, the Mc- 
Nultys found no funding and very little 
practical help. 

"I've been told to move," McNulty 
said. "In this particular area there isn't 
a huge group of resources. If you have 
a child with autism, you would normally 
look to school districts and regional cen- 
ters to provide care for your children. If I 
was living in Sherman Oaks, this would 
get funded and I could find people within 
a month. But instead, I'm trying to get 
more awareness." 



To care for Kyle, McNulty has dipped 
into her own wallet: taking out a line of 
credit on her and her husband's mortgage 
to cover the program's $5,000 monthly 
expense. But it's been worth it. Her son 
is now improving in areas like turn-tak- 
ing and verbal interpretations: areas 
in which other children suffering from 
the syndrome often have difficulty. She 
hopes to one day bring a program to CLU 
to inform students, as well as continue to 
educate her community of the ways to 
help children such as her son. 

If you would like to con- 
tact Mcnulty, you can do so at: 
jennim@mcnultyco.com 



Fat Tuesday is over and the 
40 days of Lent have begun 



By Cameron Brown 
Staff writer 



Students, faculty and residents within 
the Thousand Oaks community joined in 
the Samuelson Chapel on Wednesday, 
March 5 to celebrate the coming season 
of Lent. 

"Lent is a reminder of when Jesus 
came and granted us new life through 
his own death and resurrection," Pastor 
Melissa Maxwell-Doherty said. "It is now 
that we remember this great deed and give 
thanks by revering the 40 days of Lent." 

For 40 days, from Ash Wednesday 
to Easter, members of the Christian faith 
are to give up something that is habitual 
in their life. The sacrifice that one makes 



during these 40 days symbolizes the sac- 
rifice that Jesus Christ made some 2,000 
years ago. 

A majority of the estimated 140 at- 
tendees approached the altar in order to 
receive the blessing of the ashes on the 
forehead. The ashes are to remind those 
that mankind came from dust, and dust 
mankind shall return, Maxwell-Doherty 
said. 

Following the distribution of the 
ashes, Bishop Dean Nelson, of the South- 
west California Synod of the Evangelical 
Lutheran Church of America, expressed 
the importance of how one should live his 
or her life, both during Lent and outside 
of Lent. 

"In order to live life in a way that is 



gratifying and respectful to God, we need 
to focus our attention on how we can live 
today to the fullest extent," Nelson said. 
"So many times we try to look to the fu- 
ture that we forget the present. We need to 
look to the present so that present aspects 
of our life are tended to." 

As Nelson continued his homily, he 
said that Lent is a time to return to our 
identity in order to become followers of 
Jesus Christ and spread the good news to 
those who need it. 

Aside from Nelson's homily, the 
overall message of the morning revolved 
around the religious term repentance, 
meaning to turn from sin and resolve to 
reform one's life. 

Prior to the beginning of the service, 



a book called "Journeying through Lent 
with Mark," by Greg Weyrauch, senior 
pastor of St. Andrew Lutheran Church in 
San Antonio, was distributed to all who 
attended. The book focuses on the trials 
and tribulations that are commonly paired 
with repentance. The book, mentions that 
"repentance is to transform an individual 
from a sinner into an individual who em- 
bodies goodness and steers away from the 
wrongfulness in the world." 

Following the homily and prayer. 
Lent had officially begun. People set 
forth on their mission to keep Lent holy 
and sacred by holding true their sacrifice 
to God. 

On their way out Maxwell-Doherty 
said , "Go in peace to love and serve." 



Brown Bag series: The art of Tai Chi 



By Leah Sanchez 
Staff writer 



California Lutheran University's 
Women's Resource Center hosted a Brown 
Bag lecture on the art of Tai Chi Tuesday, 
March 4 in the E building. The lecture 
brought a group of about 15 women, from 
ihe community. 

"1 have been coming every Tuesday 
afternoon to the Brown Bag lectures for 
three years since I first moved to Cali- 
fornia," lecture participant Beth Johnson 
said. 

Tai Chi instructor Mary Starkweather 
informed the group about the history of 
Tai Chi briefly. It was developed by master 
Chang San Feng, a Taoist monk, in the 
1300s and has been passed down from stu- 
dent to teacher for the hundreds of years 
that followed. 

Starkweather wanted the group to 
experience the exercise themselves in- 
stead of hearing about it, so the group was 
moved to the Humanities building where 
there was more room to move freely with- 



out bumping into one another. 

Starkweather teaches and practices the 
yong-long form of Tai Chi that includes 8 1 
positions. She started by showing some of 
the basic positions to the group and having 
them join in. The movements were slow 
and graceful. Starkweather gave each 
different position a name. Some of these 
names were rowing a canoe, holding a 
jar, putting a blanket on a horse and many 
others. 

"It helped me remember the positions 
by giving names that are related to every 
day motions," said Starkweather. 

The group followed Starkweather's 
instructions as she went through a short 
routine she made look easy. Of course, it 
was not that easy. The women in the group 
looked very awkward as they tried to fol- 
low along. 

Tai Chi is a very low impact sport that 
helps the circulation throughout your body 
and builds more calcium for your bones 
making them much stronger and provid- 
ing complete exercise to all the parts of 
the body. 



' "Tai Chi is very important because it 
promotes longevity," Starkweather said. 
"By practicing, you will be able to move 
longer through your life." 

Many of the women were very curious 
to find out more about Tai Chi. 

Marina Alexander, a junior pyschol- 
ogy major, thought that she would benefit 
from the lecture. 

"Since I am a student, I do a lot of 
studying," Alexander said. "I need to get 
out and exercise and move, instead of 
studying all the time." 

Starkweather has been practicing Tai 
Chi since 1989 and teaches a beginners 
class at the Rancho Simi Recreational 
Center. 

"If you are interested, it is a light way 
to start," Starkweather said. 

Starkweather had always been 
interested in martial arts, but didn't like 
the whole "martial" part. She then found 
out about teaching instructor Van Ho 
who focuses primarily on meditation and 
movement. 

"Hopefully, some people will be 



motivated by the workshop and will seek 
more," Starkweather said. 

The Brown Bag Series takes place ev- 
ery Tuesday from noon to 1 p.m. and any- 
one who wants to attend is welcome. On 
March 18, the Brown Bag lecture will be 
based on the RAIN center Easter project. 

The staff of the RAIN project, Angela 
Rowley, CLU community services coordi- 
nator, will inform guests about the shelter 
and then bunny facecloths will be made 
for the children at the shelter. 

On April 1, the Brown Bag Series 
will celebrate National Poetry month with 
readings from The Women's Poetry Net- 
work. Free popcorn and friendly faces are 
also included with each lecture. 

Gerry Christie, a community member, 
participated in the Tai Chi lecture merely 
by accident. 

"I came to the Resource Center think- 
ing that Creative Options was next week, 
but it turns out that I missed it all together," 
Christie said, " I decided to stay for the Tai 
Chi lecture instead because it sounded like 
something that I would be interested in." 



6 The Echo 



Features 



March 12, 2003 



Campus Quotes 



Would you pay for a cleaning service? 




Peter Kaplan, English major, class of Ryan Palmer, physics/math major, class of Grant Smith, political science 



2004 



of 2005 



"Why do it when 1 can get my room 
to do it?" 



najor, class Danielle Ugas, sociology major, class of 
2003 

' ' launch too" 8 '° Pay ^ ^ W0U ' d d ° ^ da °'' We ^ r °° mmate deanin S /bondi "8 "' think I go to school with a bunch of 

ayS ' spoiled kids who should learn to clean for 

themselves." 




Anna Lopez, biology major, class of Kat elin Barrow, liberal studies major, class Aaron Miller, bio chemistry „ .,,. 

2006 of2004 of2006 emisiry major, class Jack Howard, multimedia major, class of 



2006 



miSLtHS^ StUdemS Can ' ( b^otltKdt b r aUSe E," "' USUa " y d0n '* TV" mUCh SPendi " 8 "' ^ « * ■«* of crap, 

ousy college student and my cleaning skills money on a regular basis. I wouldn't be 

aren 't that good yet." able to afford it." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jon Gonzales 



This week's crossword puzzle. 



puzz133 





2 


3 




\* 


5 


6 


' 




I 


B 


10 


« 




12 






13 








14 
















16 






1 " 












18 






19 






20 










21 




22 








23 


24 


25 


26 






28 H 2d 






flftfl 30 














BUI" 




H" 






34 






" 




38 




m 37 






jWM 36 








39 








40 








" 








42 


43 






£§j " 






45 


46 






43 


48 










50 






51 








52 








1 


83 








54 
















56 








57 









ACROSS 
1 Pork 
4 Asterisk 
8 Simple 

1 2 Collection 

13 Fork prong 

14 Press 

15 Office holders 

16 Remove 
18 Recover 

20 Nol yours 

21 Position upon 

22 Rug 

23 Measure 
27 Picnic pest 

29 Pass between two peaks 

30 Fast 

31 In the event that 

32 Place for bathing 

33 Sun 

34 Midwestern state (abbr ) 

35 Station 

37 Cat sound 

38 Place 

39 Blue pencil 

40 Female hog 



41 Near 

42 Climb down 
44 Likeness 

47 Gradual process 

51 Fancy shooting marble 

52 Acute angle 

53 Always 

54 Relationship with (suf ) 

55 Prepared golf ball 

56 Wrthered 

57 Vehicle 

DOWN 
t Tresses 

2 Feminine name 

3 Good luck symbol 

4 Walk 

5 Sesame plant 

6 Beast 

7 Cancel a charge 

8 Element 

9 Period of time 

1 Decompose 

1 1 Direction (abbr ) 
17 Office holder 

19 Indefinite article 



22 Unruly crowd 

24 Newsgathering organization (abbi 

25 Duration 

26 Prepare for publication 

27 Helper 

28 Want 

29 Slice 

30 Aline 

32 Added 

33 Mend 

36 16th Greek letter 

37 Reason 

38 Electricity 

40 Place of an event 

41 Be 

43 Lutetium symbol 

44 In the case of (two words) 

45 Festive occasion 

46 Large pitcher 

47 Time 2one (abbr ) 

48 Compete 

49 Unit 

50 Over (poetic) 



March 12, 2003 



Arts 



The Echo 7 



Ledbetter's "Southern 
Illinois Nights" a success 



By Christian Coleman 
Staff writer 



"Southern Illinois Nights" is a perfor- 
mance art piece composed of a series of 
poems, written by English professor Dr. 
Jack Ledbetter. The poems are a series of 
different stories taken from Ledbetter's 
childhood life while growing up in south- 
ern Illinois during the 1930s. 

The performance was composed of 
eight to 10 poems, using both dialogues 
and monologues to recollect the stories 
of characters within Ledbetter's child- 
hood years. Some of these characters are 
fictional and others are actual real people 
that Ledbetter knew during his child- 
hood. The performance was presented on 
Feb. 21 and 22 to CLU faculty, staff and 
students in the Prues-Brandt Forum. The 
whole production consisted of 20-25 cast 
members, including Ledbetter, and two 



non-cast members, the producer and the 
director. 

In the process of creating "Southern 
Illinois Nights."drama professor Ken 
Gardner functioned as the producer, be- 
hind the scenes coordinator and promoter 
of the performance. 

"The costumes, music and overall 
style of the performance was of the 1930s 
era; we had a live banjo player and other 
recorded live music in the performance; 
the music had elements of country and 
gospel and the setting of the performance 
was in a religious farm community," Gard- 
ner said. 

"I like to develop new works in the- 
ater. Theater is not just about dead play- 
wrights, but to provide new works that talk 
about our current situation in the world," 
Gardner said. 

Ledbetter, creator of "Southern Illi- 
nois Nights," wrote poems of characters 



CD Review 



By Karen Soltis 
Staff writer 



The music sounds upbeat, but the lyr- 
ics are filled with meaningful thoughts 
and emotions that seem to come straight 
from the heart — and personal experience. 
Welcome to Simple Plan's "No Pads, No 
Helmets... Just Balls." 

The group hit mainstream with "I'd Do 
Anything," a song begging a lost love not 
to forget their time together.and to give the 
vocalist another chance, the chance to "do 
anything" to bring her back. The words are 
powerful and to the point, and, despite the 
high energy in the music, the words are still 
filled with longing and desire. 

Simple Plan's latest song, "Addicted," 
sounds strikingly similar to Lit's song, 
"Addicted to You," which has raised a few 
eyebrows. Simple Plan's version goes: "I'm 
a dick/ I'm addicted to you." Where as Lit's 
version reads, "I'm so addicted to you/ And 
you're such a dick to me." Despite the par- 
allelism. Simple Plan's lyrics are fresh and 
new. They reek of yearning for something 
just beyond their reach, of everyday distur- 
bances that everyone goes through. 

Take, for example, their song, "One 



Real entertainment is scripted! 

Creative Genius Productions 
presents 

"A Night Away From Reality T.V." March 13, 
14 and 15 at 8 p.m. in the Preus-Brandt Forum. 

Creative Genius Productions is putting on a festival of plays 

for FREE for three nights only. The festival is called "A Night 

Away From Reality T.V." It is a festival of 14 one-act plays each 

playing on two of the three nights. The plays are directed by the 

Creative Genius Production members who are drama majors 

and members of the 20th Century theater capstone class. 



that touched and deeply affected his life. 

"The process of putting this project 
together took over a year to complete; we 
took the poems and adapted them to the 
stage through the use of monologues and 
dialogues. I wrote many of the poems that 
we used for the stage many years ago. but 
some were new poems that 1 decided to 
add to the story. The principal job of an 
artist is to express the feelings of other 
people. The most difficult task in com- 
posing a poem or performance piece is 
to capture the moment. A person's life is 
composed of many unique moments. One 
moment is not more important than other, 
all an artist can try to do is to capture the 
best of people's lives," Ledbetter said. 

Barbara Wegher- Thompson was the 
director and the person responsible for the 
look and feel of the stage performance. 

"Working with Jack and Ken was 
an awesome experience. I was deeply 



touched by their devotion and passion for 
their work. The performance addressed is- 
sues of death and after life, relationships 
between lovers, and God. The story is 
about a young boy growing up on farm 
community that witnessed events that 
forever shaped his life. The opening scene 
in the performance is of a baptism out in 
a nearby river where the community gath- 
ers to praise God. The devotion to God by 
the community is what causes the young 
boy to see God in everything, at times its 
beautiful and terrifying. This story had in- 
credible depth, soul, and caused all of the 
cast members to work from a place deep 
inside themselves, it was not superficial." 
Wegher-Thomson said. 

"For Dr. Ledbetter it was a huge suc- 
cess. We worked very hard, and a lot of us 
thought it was great. It was well accepted 
by the people who saw it," Julie Norman, 
a junior involved with the play said. 



Day. 1 he lyrics say, sometimes this 
house feels like a prison/ That I just can't 
leave behind/ There's so many rules/ 1 got to 
follow/ 'Cuzyou can't let go." The song ex- 
emplifies teen angst at its highest. Another 
of their songs, called "Perfect," is all about 
yearning for a father's approval, certainly 
something everyone can relate to. 

Simple Plan's lyrics are a narrative of 
today's youth and feelings. They have a 
clean, energetic sound, with lyrics parents 
couldn't argue with when they're compared 
with other music today. The words are filled 
with pain, and even the CD itself is decorat- 
ed with a broken heart, a frowning face and 
a rain cloud. The music, though, doesn't 
sound as depressing as it's cover would like 
to portray; rather, it seems to make light of 
these every day miseries that come with 
growing up. In "God Must Hate Me," they 
sing, "Last night 1 had to study for this test/ 
1 forgot man I'm dead/ And now my brain 
is bursting out of my head/ I can't think I 
can't breathe/ Once again." Almost every 
person who was ever a student has felt like 
that before. 

They may not be Britney Spears or Nir- 
vana, but they're quickly making a name for 
themselves. And everyone is listening. 



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8 The Echo 



Opinion 



March 12,2003 



Pay attention to news and alerts 




How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor 

are welcome on any topic 

related to CLU or The Echo. 

Letters must include the 

writer's name, year/position 

and major/department. 

Letters are subject to editing 
for space and clarity. 



Printing 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be published 
on the following dates: 

April 2, 2003 
April 23, 2003 
May 14, 2003 




By Michele Hatler 
Editor in chief 



Ever since the September 1 1 tragedy, 
the United States has been on some type 
of "alert." The Bush administration un- 
veiled a color-coded alert system to rank 
the severity of terrorist attacks on March 
12,2002. 

The colors for the alert codes are 
green, blue, yellow, orange and red. 
Green is the least severe of the warnings; 



it represents a low advisory for attack. 
When the code changes to blue it means 
we are on a guarded level. Yellow means 
there's a more elevated chance of terror- 
ism. Orange means high alert, which is 
the color we are currently on. Red is the 
highest alert and indicates a severe alert. 

These color-coded warning alert sys- 
tems are being used to inform Americans 
as to the degree of threat of terrorists. But 
what do these colors really mean to the 
average person? There seem to be two 
reactions to this new warning system. 

There are people out there who be- 
come desensitized to the warnings and 
blow them off. Then, there are others 
who stock up with gallons of water, duct 
tape and canned foods. Being prepared 
for the worst is fine, but being paranoid 
is another thing. A way to reduce panic 
and confusion with the situation America 
finds itself in is for its citizens to become 
informed. 



Instead of watching "reality" televi- 
sion shows, watch some real news. If 
citizens keep themselves informed about 
what is going on in the world, they will 
have a better perspective as to what the 
real warning level should be. Maybe one 
person's opinion after being informed is 
not so much at an orange level but maybe 
a green level. 

What does it really mean to be at an 
"orange" warning level to an uninformed 
viewer? There are even comedy skits on 
Saturday Night Live, poking fun at be- 
ing heightened to an "orange warning 
level." Instead of worrying, people were 
dancing and celebrating the new level on 
SNL. This is what it has come to. 

The warning system needs to be 
changed. Everyone knows that we are 
on alert, we have been for a long time 
now. Keep Americans informed and tell 
us why we should be on alert, but don't 
color code it. 



Editorial 



Iraqi oil and France 



By Josh Simmons 
Staff Writer 



It is well known that France is at- 
tempting to block any U.N. resolution 
allowing force to liberate Iraq. Howev- 
er, why would French President Jacques 
Chirac want to allow Saddam Hussein to 
stay in power? 

According to British Broadcasting 
Corperation news, "France's policy to- 
wards Iraq is driven by the prospect of 
lucrative deals for French companies, 
notably oil giants, once U.N. sanctions 
are lifted." 

According to the French book, "Our 
Ally Saddam," "As for financiers, indus- 
trialists and above all those responsible 
for military industry, the question must 
be put to French politicians: Who did 
not benefit from these business contracts 
and relationships with Iraq? . . . With 



respect to the politicians, one needs 
only refer back to the declarations of 
all the political parties of France, Right 
and Left. All were happy to brag about 
their friendship with Iraq and to refer 
to common interests. From Mr. Chi- 
rac [now the center-right president] to 
Mr. Chevenement [the socialist former 
defense minister] . . . politicians and 
economic leaders were in open compe- 
tition to spend time with us and flatter 
us. We have now grasped the reality of 
the situation [of France's support for the 
1991 Gulf War, a betrayal in Saddam's 
eyes]. If the trickery continues, we will 
be forced to unmask them, all of them, 
before the French public." 

According to "The Weekly Stan- 
dard," "French businesses, led by the 
oil conglomerates, established warm 
and profitable relationships with Iraq's 
Baathist regime dating back to the 
1970s, when Iraq ditched Anglo-Ameri- 



can companies and nationalized its oil 
industry. Again, after the 1991 Gulf 
War, French companies moved aggres- 
sively into the business channels opened 
up by the U.N.'s oil-for-food deal with 
Iraq. France's defense industry has also 
profited from sales to Iraq." 

France, under Chirac built a nu- 
clear reactor near Baghdad, which was 
bombed by Israel. 

Hussein has threatened to reveal all 
of the connections between France and 
Iraq if the French try to disarm Iraq by 
force. 

This upcoming war is not about the 
U.S. oil interests; if we wanted more 
Iraqi oil, we could simply loosen the oil 
for food regulations or lift embargos all 
together. This lack of support for dis- 
arming Hussein by the French is about 
French oil interests in Iraq. Questions or 
comments: jsimmons@clunet.edu 



The 



Echo Staff 



Michele Hatler 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/ 

Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 

Business Manager 

Brett Rowland 

News Editor 

Karen Peterson 
Arts & Features Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Opinon Editor 



Katie Bashaw 

Sports Editor 

Scott Gasperino 
Photo Editor 

Eric Ingemunson 
Online Editor • 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Heather Molloy 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Editorial Mailer: The staff of The Echo welcomes commenls 
on its articles as well as on Ihe newspaper ilself However, the 
staff acknowledges that opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, 
-editorials, letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the adverti: 
ing party of otherwise specifically stated advertisements in The 
Echo are inserted by commercial activities or venrures identi- 
fied in the advertisements themselves and not by California 
Lutheran University. Advertising material printed herein is 
solely for informational purposes. Such printing is not to be 
construed as a written and implied sponsorship, endorsement, 
or investigation of such commercial enterprises or ventures. 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (805l 493-3865. 



Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief. The Echo, California Lutheran Univer- 
sity. 60 West Olsen Road Thousand Oaks. CA 92360-2787. 
Telephone: (805) 493-3465: Fax: (805) 493-3327: E-mail 
ccho@dunet.edu. 



March 12,2003 



Opinion 



The Echo 9 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Echo: 



Michele Hatler couldn't have put it 
any better when she expressed the dilemma 
we college students face everyday ("Rising 
gas prices: Really necessary?", February 
12, 2003). 

On one hand, we feel we have to put 
up with ever-rising gasoline prices as we 
conduct our day-to-day business. On the 
other hand, few alternatives to driving ex- 
ist in Thousand Oaks. Additionally, very 
few places of interest to students exist 
within walking or bicycling distance of 
the campus; thus, many students feel they 
must drive off campus to spend their lei- 
sure time. 

On a related matter, campus parking 
remains a major concern among the stu- 
dent body. I've often heard grumblings 
about the lack of parking on campus, es- 
pecially near classrooms. Commuters want 
to park in locations convenient to them 
- especially night students, for obvious 
reasons. 

Now is the time for the university 
community to think about and discuss how 
we can improve campus transportation and 
parking. Our choices - both as individuals 
and collectively - affect not only our per- 
sonal lives, but also the university's stand- 
ing with the local Thousand Oaks commu- 
nity. Each person should make a good-faith 
effort to contribute to the good of the com- 
munity. Nevertheless, we all have a collec- 
tive responsibility to each other. 

In this spirit, we all should work to- 



gether to reduce demand for parking on 
campus by providing feasible alternatives 
to driving alone. I propose that the uni- 
versity implement incentive-based student 
rideshare program. Since nearly all stu- 
dents-both residential and commuter-have 
automobiles, carpooling may produce the 
greatest benefits for the student body. The 
university should include students in the 
existing faculty/staff rideshare program. 
Two key incentives consist of parking 
fee exemptions and exclusive parking 
lots with choice spaces located nearest the 
classrooms. Existing faculty/staff restricted 
parking lots already in place would remain 
unaffected. There should be discounted 
transit passes for students, faculty, and 
staff. Using Thousand Oaks Transit, stu- 
dents can access shopping centers, librar- 
ies, jobs, and other transportation services. 
CLU should offer its students, fac- 
ulty and staff discounted "Go Ventura" bus 
passes, which are valid throughout Ventura 
County. CSU Channel Islands offers its 
students countywide transit passes for 
$25 a semester. (The regular monthly pass 
costs $40 a month.) Also, there is campus 
shuttle service. We should contract with 
a local taxi or airport shuttle company to 
provide transportation services that meet 
the needs of the university community. A 
CLU shuttle would operate all week be- 
tween the campus and points throughout 
the Conejo Valley, as well as places such 
as the Reagan Library and the Moorpark 
Metrolink Station. Fares would amount to 
no more than $0.25/ride. Only members 



of the university community, and possi- 
bly campus visitors, may use the service. 
Paid on-campus parking would fund these 
transportation improvements, as well as 
new parking lots. The university should 
institute modest parking permit fees. Se- 
mester permits would cost $30-$40. about 
the same as local community colleges. 
Carpools will be exempt from parking 
charges. Such fees help to reinforce in- 
centives for utilizing alternative means of 
transportation. 

Additional funding sources for these 
programs may include existing student 
fees and parking fines. By encouraging 
everyone to avoid driving alone whenever 
possible, the university will reduce the de- 
mand for on-campus parking and benefit in 
several other ways: students can spend less 
money on necessities. As Michele pointed 
out, we college students have little money 
to begin with, only to be gouged at the gas 
pump. Already we pay upwards of $9,500 
per semester in tuition; we shouldn't have 
to contend with inadequate parking and the 
lack of driving alternatives. 

Our neighbors will look more favor- 
ably upon the university. As our campus 
undergoes significant expansion, the sup- 
port of the local community will remain 
critical. We can't afford to ignore the 
concerns of our neighbors, including traf- 
fic, noise and crime. Remember, the uni- 
versity's interests (e.g., the Master Plan) 
are at stake. We can attract a more diverse 
student body to the campus. Let's not leave 
out those prospective students who wish 



to experience the full college experience 
yet don't have cars. Diversity of heritage, 
life experience and opinion will benefit the 
university community as a whole. 

For more information on alternative 
transportation, please visit these websites: 
Ventura County Transportation Commis- 
sion (http://www.goventura.org/) - Com- 
prehensive transportation information spe- 
cific to Ventura County, including the "Go 
Ventura" bus pass. SoCalCommute.org 
(http://www.socalcommute.org/) - Pro- 
motes alternative commuting options; 
includes a list of 20 ways to save gas and 
a commuting cost calculator. Thousand 
Oaks Transit (http://www.toaks.org/ 
Public%20Works/tot2002transitinfo.htm) 
- T.O. bus schedules. 

We as a campus community - residen- 
tial and commuter students, faculty, staff 
and administration - need to take action 
to resolve the transportation/parking is- 
sue. I strongly encourage everyone on 
campus to carpool/vanpool, ride the bus, 
walk or bicycle around town rather than 
drive alone. Everyone is welcome to par- 
ticipate in the dialogue. Feel free to share 
your thoughts with the campus community 
and with me. E-mail me on this matter at 
mdivindo@clunet.edu or mikey!ikesit8 
05@yahoo.com. Let's all demand better 
of ourselves and of the university com- 
munity. 

Michael Divindo 
Class of 2003 
computer science major 



Dear Echo, 

After serving in several editor positions on the Echo staff for the last two years, I 
understand the time constraints that you are all under when Sunday and Monday roll 
around. However, when I opened a copy of the Echo on March 5 to see the track and field 
coverage, two things upset me. 

First, 1 donated a few pictures that 1 had taken at this past weekends meet because our 
meets are too far for Echo photographers to attend. 1 understand this. However, I can't 
understand how one of the pictures (the one of two athletes performing a handoff in a re- 
lay race) got cropped so that the two California Lutheran University athletes were barely 
in the picture at all. Also, the Cal Tech runner is clearly seen in the foreground with an 
empty space right in the middle. So, if you open a copy of the March 5 issue and turn to 
page 11, it looks like the pole vault pit in the background is the focus of the picture. 

As a previous photo editor for the paper, I know that it is not that hard to crop a pic- 
ture so that what you want in the picture is actually in the picture. I'm hoping this is just 



an error of the printers. 

Second, I was happy to see my season best performance in the javelin as one of the 
bullets in the article ("Track and Field Results"). However, by reading the article no one 
else on campus would know it was for the javelin because it didn't say what I threw, only 
that I threw it 149*05." 

Again, I understand the time constraints of the job. but this is what the proofreaders 
are for. I have also been a proofreader for the Echo, so I know that simple things like this 
are easy to catch and fix before going to print. Please take this as constructive criticism; 
I'm not trying to put any of you down in any way. I hope that in the future when I submit 
photos to help you out, they get cropped more efficiently so that my teammates can actu- 
ally be seen in the final copy. Thank you. 

Cory Hughes 
Class of 2004 
English Major 



Kritter not returning to Club Lu's CLW 



Dear Echo, 

. Well the rumor is official, and Kritter is not going to be in this year's wrestling 
show. As we all know, last year was the year of the Kritter. Kritter stole the show in 
the CLW's first-ever wrestling show and instantly became a fan favorite. But when I 
heard the rumor around campus that Kritter was not going to participate in this year's 
show, 1 just had to find out the truth for myself. 

The rumor became reality after I talked to both Commissioner of the CLW Jimmy 
Fox and Kritter. There are always two sides to a story, and, after talking with both of 
them, each story turned out to be completely different. An irreconcilable difference 
was the reason for Kritter not being in the show according to Fox. 

"In the end. me and Kritter couldn't see eye-to-eye in certain aspects of the show," 
Fox said. "It turned out to be too difficult to work with him." After talking to Fox, I 



quickly interviewed Kritter to get his take on the situation. According to Kritter, it was 
Fox who was attempting to control Kritter-mania and censor him. 

"He wouldn't let me be me," Kritter said. "He wanted to control the Kritter." 
Kritter also eluded to die fact that after an incident in February where Kritter and Fox 
verbally assaulted one another, they have stopped talking ever since. There might also 
be a grudge between the two after listening to them go on about one another. 

So is dlis the truth? Is Kritter, the star of last year's show not going to wrestle? 
Or is this just another publicity stunt? It is up to you to decide. I know one thing: on 
Friday. March 14 at 9:00 p.m.. I, along with the rest of the CLW fans will be anxiously 
waiting to find out. 



CLW is a Club Lu program brought to CLU by the Programs Board. This editorial is 
brought to you by the CLW. 



Come to Club Lu and check out the C1W 



10 The Echo 



Sports 



March 12,2003 



Knights rugby owns Azusa Pacific, 
loses to Occidental and Claremont 



By Alex Espinoza 
Staff Writer 



After losing matches with Occidental 
and Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, the Knights 
rugby team closed out its home season 
with a win over Azusa Pacific University. 
CLU vs. Occidental 

The Knights jumped out of the gates 
early on March 1 at home against the Oc- 
cidental Tigers. They started the game out 
by driving the ball down three inches from 
the goal line, but penalties kept them from 
scoring 

The Knights put together a string of 
short runs to get in scoring position. They 
were also helped by a series of Occidental 
penalties. After a missed opportunity, the 
momentum shifted back and forth with 
both teams threatening to score. The first 
half ended in a tie. 

Tempers started to flare when the Ti- 
gers were driving deep into the Knights . 
territory. 

After a kick downfield by the Tigers, 
there was a fight for the ball and a scuffle 
broke out. Punches were thrown and play- 
ers were penalized. One of the Tigers play- 
ers was ejected from the match and they 
were forced to play a man down. However, 
neither team could capitalize on the pen- 
alty. 

"We dominated the scrums and had ex- 
cellent rucks. But we had too many penal- 
ties and didn't stick to the game plan," said 
junior Wes Jones. "Bad communication on 
our part kept us from scoring early on." 

The Knights had many players who 
contributed on their opening drive. The 
drive featured runs by senior T.J. Hender- 
son, senior John Whiteley, freshman Dan 
Sojo. and sophomore Micah Hamilton 

"We had a chance to set the tone for 



the game early on, but we let it slip away. 
If we remained consistent we would've put 
them away early." said Hamilton. "They 
came out with the momentum in the sec- 
ond half, and we just sat back and watched 
them," said Hamilton 

The Tigers came out in the second 
half and put two scores on the board, but 
missed both kicks. The Knights only score 
came late in the game on a 40-yard run by 
sophomore Brandon Barclay. Henderson 
missed the kick after. It was another case 
of too little too late for the Knights. 

"We just have to take from this game 
what we can, regroup and get ready for our 
next game," said Whiteley. 
CLU vs. Claremont 

The Knights put up a valiant effort but 
were just overmatched against the Stags, 
who are ranked seventh in the nation. It 
was another case of missed tackles and a 
lack of defensive intensity that resulted in 
a 43-7 loss. 

In addition to the miscues and mental 
mistakes, the Knights committed too many 
penalties to overcome. The Stags capital- 
ized on every mistake by converting them 
into big plays and scoring opportunities. 

"They just outplayed and outcoached 
us today. They were all on the same page 
and we couldn't put anything together," 
Hamilton said. 
CLU vs. Azusa Pacific 

In the Knights last home game of the 
season, they bounced back and used the 
Claremont game as motivation. The be- 
ginning of the game was back and forth 
with both teams trying to establish some 
offense. The Knights used some early of- 
fense and timely defense to seal a 10-6 
victory. 

Azusa jumped on the scoreboard first 
when they converted on a 36-yard kick at- 



tempt. The Knights answered back with a 
long drive that resulted in a score by senior 
Travis Henderson who failed to convert the 
kick after. 

"It was good that the seniors played 
so well today. It was a nice way for us to 
go out in our last home game," said Hen- 
derson. 

The game was played on Azusa's side 
of the field the majority of the time. One 
of the keys to winning the battle of field 
position was a combination of defense and 
offense. The Knights dished out some big 
hits and caused many turnovers that al- 
lowed their forwards to slowly move the 
ball down- 
field. 

" W 



and bolted 50 yards downfield. That long 
run set up a five-yard score by senior Mark 
Glesne. 

In the second half the Knights .played 
a more conservative game and held Azusa 
to one score coming on a 30-yard kick 
attempt. Their defense came up big on a 
couple of goal line stands that prevented 
Azusa from taking control of the game. 

"Defense was the key to the game. 
Penalties allowed them to march down 
the field on us, but consistency on defense 
helped win the game" said Hamilton. 

The Knights next game is March 15 
away at Pepperdine at 1 p.m. 




phtitogfapli tn Markus Komki.' 

The entire Knights team dashes to rescue the ball from an Azusa player. 



Men's tennis wins, women lose 
against out -of-state competition 



By Victor Esquer 

Staff Writer 



This week the tennis teams took a 
break from SCIAC action to play non-con- 
ference matches against teams from Texas 
and Missouri. 
Kingsmen vs. Southwestern 

The men's tennis team had no problem 
with Southwestern University from Texas 
as they silenced them, 7-0. The Kingsmen 
did not lose any sets and Amir Marandy 
managed to stay undefeated this season as 
he pounded Michael Mendelow 6-2, 6-2, 
in the No. 1 singles match. Arif Hasan 
defeated Travis Bias 6-3, 7-6 in the No. 2 
singles and Quoc Ly handed Dillon Gussis 
a loss 6-3, 6-3 in the No.3 singles match. 
Junya Hasebe, Quinn Calderon and Karlo 
Arapovic had no problems in their matches 
as they swept their opponents in straight 
sets. Ly and Hasan also won their No.l 
doubles match by defeating Mendelow and 
Bias 8-6. 

"I am not surprised at all at how well 
we are playing; we've been working hard 
all year and we will continue to do so. Ev- 
eryone is doing their part and that's what's 
important," said Hasan. 

The win moved the Kingsmen to 6-1 
overall. 



Regals vs. Washington 

The Regals fought hard but were 
unable to defeat the fourteenth-ranked 
Washington University tennis team from 
Missouri. The Regals were able to win two 
of the three doubles matches. The dynamic 
duo of Becca Hunau and Lisa Novajosky 
won their No. 1 doubles match, 8-5. Nova- 
josky remained undefeated in both singles 
and doubles matches. She was the only 
Regal to win a singles match and did it in 
straight sets against Steph Cook, 7-6, 6-0. 
In the No. 2 doubles match, Jen Hansen 
and Stephanie Perkins downed sisters Kaci 
and Steph Cook 8-4. 

"All we can do is move forward and 
get back to winning," said Hunau. 

Hunau is very pleased with the way 
they've been competing on a daily basis 
and not giving up. 

"We play hard every match and that is 
all you can ask. Sometimes it's going to go 
our way and sometimes it won't; you just 
have to keep playing," said Hunau. 

Hunau is very proyud of her teammate 
and doubles partner Lisa Novajosky's suc- 
cess this season. 

"She is one of the hardest workers I 
know, not only is she a great tennis player 
and undefeated this season so far, but she is 
a great teammate," said Hunau. 



The Regals look to bounce back on 
March 14 when they play the University of 
Mary Hardin-Baylor from Texas. 




plitiiogr.iph h> Summer Scarborough 

Stephanie Perkins prepares to serve in her 
winning No. 2 match with doubles team- 
mate Jen Hanson. 



IM soccer 

championship 

game: 

Tomorrow 
night at 9 p.m. 

in the gym 



Jake Bullock's 
XBA 



V. 

Kris Johnson's 

SCORE 



March 12, 2003 



Sports 



The Echo 11 



Regals win series against Athenas, 
split gam es in Sun West Tourney 



By John Bona 
Staff Writer 



The Regals Softball team stepped up to 
the competition this week, splitting games 
in the Sun West Tournament and winning 
the series agaisnt the Claremont-Mudd- 
Scripps Athenas over the weekend. 
CLU at Sun West Tournament 

The Cal Lutheran Softball team won 
12-0 over Chapman University then lost 3- 
against Cabrini College last Wednesday 
in the first round of the Sun West Tourna- 
ment at Hart Park in Orange. 

Many have called Cal Lutheran's vic- 
tory over Chapman one of the best games 
the Regals have played in years. CLU 
scored four runs in the third, five in the 
fourth and another three in the fifth. Ju- 
nior Emily Otineru led the scoring parade, 
going 3-3 with three RBIs and two runs 
scored. Sophmore Heidi Miller also had 
three RBI and hit her first home run of the 
season. 

Pitcher Olivia Chacon improved to 3- 1 
on the season, giving upjust three hits over 
five innings. 

While the win over Chapman was im- 



pressive, the Regals may have used up too 
much of their firepower as they struggled 
later that day against Cabrini College. Cal 
Lu fell behind 2-0 in the first inning and 
never got back into the game. Junior Carrie 
Mitchell went 2-3. but the team managed 
only four hits and failed to get any offen- 
sive momentum going. 

The Regals will see more Sun West 
Tournament action on March 11th when 
they take on Rhode Island College. 
CLU vs. CMS 

The Cal Lutheran Softball team lost 3- 
2 last Friday at the hands of SCIAC rival 
Claremont-Mudd-Scripps. 

The Regals struck first blood in the 
second inning when freshman Gianna Re- 
gal scored off a double by senior Chelsea 
"The Godfather" Barrella. Mitchell scored 
in the third off a sacrifice fly from Miller. 
Cal Lutheran led going into the seventh 
inning until Claremont came up with two 
runs to get the come-from-behind victory. 

The Regals defeated Claremont-Mudd- 
Scripps 1-0 and 2- Tin a doubleheader last 
Saturday in Claremont. 

The Regals lone run in the first game 
came thanks to the bat of Barrella, whose 



base hit to center 
field brought in 
Mitchell. 

Senior Erin 
Neuhaus picked up 
the win for the Re- 
gals, surrendering 
just three hits. 

In the second 
game, the Regals 
found themselves 
in the middle of a 
1-1 tie after nine 
innings of play. 
Then Barrella came £• 
up big with an RBI 
base hit to win the 
game for Cal Lu- 
theran. 

The wins im- 
prove Cal Luther- 
an's record to 6-3 
in SCIAC play and 
7-10 overall, while 
the Athenas fell to 
5-4 in SCIAC, 9-10 
overall. 




pho!o;jr,i|ih h\ kchL-cc.i iNii 

Freshman Gianna Regal crossed the plate in the second on an 
RBI from senior Chelsea Barrela. but couldn 'I hang on to win on 
Friday. CLU won both games on Saturday' at Claremont. 



Kingsmen take one from Pomona- 
Pitzer, lose to Bridgewater College 



By Sean-Micheal Porter 
Staff Writer 



The Cal Lutheran baseball team 
faced a tough weekend, first losing 6-5 
to Bridgewater College in extra innings 
Thursday, March 6 at North Field and then 
losing both games to Pomona-Pitzer 6-12 
and 4-11 Saturday, March 8 in Claremont 
after beating Pomona in their first meeting, 
14-13 on Friday, March 7 at North Field. 



CLU vs. Pomona-Pitzer 

With both losses on Saturday, the 
Kingsmen dropped to 7-2 in SCIAC play 
and 14-6 overall, while Pomona improved 
to 6-3 and 10-4. Freshman Matt Hirsh and 
senior Ryan Melvin received the losses on 
the mound for the Kingsmen. 

"We got our work cut out for us now," 
said senior Taylor Slimak. "We're still in 
the driver's seat for SCIAC, but we have 
to win out." 

Friday's outcome ended in CLU's 



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favor as the Kingsmen won in thrilling 
fashion. With the game tied 13-13 in the 
bottom of the ninth, senior Brian Skaug 
singled to center field and then proceeded 
to steal second base. With one out, ju- 
nior Ryan Hostetler hit a ground ball to 
Pomona's second baseman, who threw the 
ball into the dirt, scoring Skaug to score the 
game-winning run. 

The Kingsmen had an impressive 16 
hits. CLU scored at least one run in ev- 
ery inning but the first and sixth. Pomona 
never went away, coming from behind sev- 
eral times, scouring four runs in the sixth 
to close within one and another five in the 
eighth to take a 13-11 lead. 

Senior Ryan Cooney doubled to left 
center scoring senior Jason Claros in the 
bottom of the eighth. Junior Jake High- 
smith singled to score Cooney and tied the 
game at 13-13. 

Senior Luke Stajcar had a solid perfor- 
mance going 3-for-4 with three runs scored 
and five RBI. Skaug went 3-for-5 with two 
runs and three RBI, while Claros was also 
3-for-4. Skaug, Hostetler, and Stajcar each 
hitjiome runs. 

Junior Doug Camett got the win. 



throwing one and a half scoreless innings. 
Junior starter Jason Hirsh went seven in- 
nings, allowed 12 runs on 13 hits, and 
struck out ten Pomona batters. 

"Our bullpen came through," Hirsh 
said. 
CLU vs. Bridgewater 

On Thursday it was the opponent who 
came from behind to win as a tenth-inning 
home run gave Bridgewater College the 
victory. The Kingsmen had a 5-3 lead en- 
tering the ninth, but the Eagles tallied two 
runs to tie the game and send it to extra 
innings. 

CLU scored four runs in the second in- 
ning all of them coming off of home runs. 
Senior J.R. Cortez led off with a home run 
to right field. Slimak and junior Ed Edsall 
reached base before senior Jeff Myers 
blasted a three-run homer to left field. 

"We went through the motions today," 
said Claros. 

Junior Josh Benson pitched six in- 
nings, gave up two run and got a no-deci- 
sion. Sophomore Derek Hassler came in 
and suffered the loss. 

The Kingsmen face Ithaca today at 
2:30 p.m. at North Field. 




photograph by Diana Filipcsuo 



Senior Luke Stakjar checks his swing against Pmonoa-Pitzer on Friday. He had five RBI 
in the game and went i-for-4. 



12 The Echo 



Sports 



March 12.2003 



NFL's Falcons coach to be 
presente d Landry award 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



Atlanta Falcons head coach Dan 
Reeves will be honored with the 2003 
Landry Medal at the first CLU Circle of 
Friends Dinner on March 13, for his ath- 
letic and inspirational contributions to the 
world of professional sports. 

"Reeves was chosen not only be- 
cause he exemplifies the purpose of the 
award, but because he also worked with 
Coach Landry as an assistant coach and 
as a player," University Director of Public 
Information Lynda Fulford said. "Reeves 
supports numerous organizations such as 
Wesleyan School, Eagle Ranch Boys and 
Girls Homes, Fellowship of Christian Ath- 
letes and Lutheran Ministries of Georgia." 

"The Landry Medal was created to rec- 
ognize those who serve as an inspiration to 
the young people of America," "Now is the 
Time" Campaign Assistant Director Susan 
McQuilkin said. "In particular, we look for 
individuals of exemplary religious charac- 
ter, personal integrity and public service." 

The medal recognizes those who ex- 
hibit Christian virtue, according to Interim 
Vice President of University Advancement 
and California Lutheran Educational Foun- 
dation CEO R. Stephen Wheatly, JD, and 
McQuilkin. 

"The Landry Medal was established to 
recognize those who are an inspiration to 
America's youth." Wheatly said. "The re- 
cipients are those who provide strong lead- 
ership through Christian commitment, and 
who distinguish themselves through integ- 
rity in their personal lives and careers." 

CLU Athletics Director Bruce Bryde 
and Wheatly agree Reeves was selected for 
both his athletic and personal success. 

"Obviously Dan Reeves is a very ac- 
complished coach and former athlete," 
Bryde said. "He is highly respected for his 
character as much as his athletic success. 
A person with his values is an excellent re- 
flection on CLU, in general, and it is a very 
positive association for our North Campus 
Athletics Project." 



"He's been named the NFL's coach 
of the year five times and he's the NFL's 
most winningest coach with 189 career 
victories," Wheatly said. "Reeves really 
believes God has given him the opportu- 
nity to coach and influence other men the 
way coach Landry influenced him. Coach 
Landry [was] coach of the Dallas Cow- 
boys. He really led by example. Not only 
was he an outstanding football coach, but 
he was a strong Christian mentor to those 
around him. 

"[Reeves] wasn't specifically chosen 
because of his athletic success." he said. 
"He was chosen because he exemplifies all 
of the qualities, personally and profession- 
ally, that Coach Landry displayed during 
his life. When you look at the list of ap- 
plicants, people such as former President 
Gerald Ford, George "Sparky" Anderson, 
Nancy Reagan, to name a few, they are a 
list of individuals who have touched other 
lives and made them better." 

According to information provided 
by Fulford, the medal was named after the 
late Pro-Football Hall of Fame and Dal- 
las Cowboys Ring of Honor Coach, who 
volunteered for organizations including 
the Christian Businessman's Association, 
the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, the 
President's Drug Advisory Council and the 
Dallas International Sports Commission. 
Landry's rise to prominence earned him 
the Horatio Alger Award. 

The dinner will bring corporate, in- 
dividual and prospective donors to the 
Beverly Hills Hotel in honor of Reeves and 
CLU's accomplishments. In addition, the 
dinner will serve to publicly announce the 
"Now is the Time" campaign. 

McQuilkin said that Charles Schulz 
received the first medal in 1980 and that, 
instead of a dinner, the university used to 
honor the medal recipients at a banquet. 
Other previous recipients include Art Lin- 
kletter and former UCLA basketball coach 
John Wooden. 

"We used to have a benefit banquet," 
McQuilkin said. "We would bring the 
people closest to CLU, major donors and 




photograph courtesy of University Relations 
Atlanta Falcons head coach Dan Reeves 

others, who provided support to the univer- 
sity in numerous ways." 

According to information by Fulford, 
the connection between CLU and the 
Cowboys began in 1962, with the idea to 
hold the Cowboys summer training camp 
on campus. Support from the NFL team 
and Landry facilitated the development of 
CLU's athletics program and facilities. An- 
nual fund-raisers assisted in funding CLU 
student scholarships. 

Reeves is a native of Rome, Ga., and 
received a football scholarship from the 
University of South Carolina. He played 
for the Cowboys under Landry and be- 
came a player coach in 1970, following a 
career-ending knee injury. The two worked 
together for 15 years, while the Cowboys 
trained over the summer at CLU. Reeves 
coached the Denver Broncos and the New 
York Giants before joining the Falcons. 

"It's really a privilege and an honor 
for CLU to continue to recognize coach 
Landry and those like him who are strong 
Christian leaders and teach others to be the 
same," Wheatly said. 



this week's 

Kingsmen & 

Regals action 



Today, March 12 

-baseball v. Ithaca 
2:30 p.m. 

Friday, March 14 

-Softball at La Verne 
-w tennis v. Mary Hardin- 
Baylor (TX) 2p.m. 



Saturday, March 15 

-w tennis at Chapman 
-softball v. La Verne (2) 
noon & 2 p.m. 
-rugby at Pepperdine 



Monday, March 17 

-golf at Huntingdon 
Invitational (GA) 



Tuesday, March 18 

-golf at Huntingdon 
Invitational (GA) 
-w tennis v. Skidmore 
(NY) 2 p.m. 

home games indicated by italics 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 



Indoor Soccer 
Championship Game 

Thursday, March 1 3 at 9 p.m. - gym 

XBA v. SCORE 



Results from Sunday's playoffs: 

7 p.m. Hardwood Starz (3-2) 10/Panda Express (3-2) 1 

all stars: Wes Johnson & Lyle Nelson 
(winner of this game plays at 9 p.m. for a spot in the finals) 

8 p.m. Score (5-1 )/His Whole Life (4-1) 

(forfeit due to illegal player) 
all stars: Marissa Lipari & Kelsey Mitchell 

9 p.m. XBA (6-0) 7/Hardwood Starz 2 

all stars: Laura O'Neill & Wes Johnson 



NO SOFTBALL 

THIS WEEK! 

Softball 
ALL-STARS 

Logan Bf.nbrook 

Rob Simmons 

Travis Henderson 

Pam Ciark 

Travis Wynns 

Joe Decker 

Dean Kijpfel 

Corey Reed 

Brendan Kinion 

Beau Kimrreu 

Scott Mehl 

Ai.fonzo Rodriguez 

Tyler Ruiz 

Lauren Habir 



SOFTBALL 


STANDINGS 


Pink Bunny Rabbits 


2-0 (47) 


Soiland 


2-0 (41) 


Holy Hitters 


2-0 (29) 


Tools 


2-0 (25) 


Field Stompers 


2-0 (24) 


Daryl Strawberry 


1-0 (20) 


Fo Sho Fo Sho 


1-0 (14) 


#1 Stunnaz 


1-0 (18) 


Bogards 


1-0(10) 


Dirty South 


1-1 (12) 


Weekend Warriors 


0-1 (12) 


Hang Ten 


0-1 (10) 


Hot Potatoes 


0-1 (5) 


Big Purple Machine 


0-1 (3) 


John Morse 


o-i (1) 


Dogs with Legs 


0-1 (0) 


Your Grandpa's Daughter 0-2 (15) 


Coconut Crushers 


0-2 (10) 


Utah Jamz 


0-2 (6) 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 43. No. 19 


60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 


March 19. 2003 


Sports 


Features 


News 


Amir Marandi still 


Special section on CLU's 


No end in sight for 


undefeated in tennis singles. 


study abroad program. 


parking problems. 


See story page 10 


See story page 5 


See story page 3 



Computer theft on rise 



By Mark Glesne 
Staff Writer 



Two AVID editing systems were sto- 
len, along with the RAM from two other 
editing systems Tuesday night, March 1 1 . 

The equipment was stolen from an ed- 
iting room in the Spies-Bornemann Center 
for Education and Technology. 

"We're used to having this safe com- 
munity, but I've been jolted from that. 
We don't live in an ideal community and 
these kinds of instances are occurring more 
frequently," said Associate Provost for In- 
formation Services Julius Bianchi. "What 
I think is the most distressing is the rapid 
increase in these incidences over the past 
four months." 

Since December, there has been a ris- 
ing number of thefts involving equipment. 
A ceilingmounted LCD projector was sto- 
len from the D Building, room 13. 

A computer and another LCD projec- 
tor were also stolen from the Nygreen 
building. The drama department reported 
a computer loss due to theft. 

According to the CLU Human Re- 
sources web page, the administrative posi- 
tion of manager of security and safety is 
currently open. 




Photograph courtesy of John Fritz 

Two AVID editing systems and RAM were stolen from the Spies-Bornemann Center for 
Education and Technology Tuesday, March II. 



David Grannis of the ISS department 
says that they are waiting for the new se- 
curity officer, who should be coming in the 
next few weeks, to receive his input on the 
new security measures to be implemented. 
A new security system is going to be acti- 
vated in areas where technology is avail- 
able to students. 

"We had about 80 percent of the com- 
puters locked down, but now almost every 



computer on campus is going to be locked 
down," Grannis said. 

According to Grannis, ISS and security 
are going to be looking into a video camera 
system, as well as a punch key system. The 
key system will require an ID and a photo- 
copy of the student's driver's license. 

Students will have a key and ID num- 
ber that tracks who was in the room at what 
time, what they used and when they left. 



"It's a shame we have 
to do this sort of thing 
around here, but it has to 
be done." 



Julius Bianchi 
Associate Provost for ISS 

Doors to the editing rooms will now 
be locked down and student access to these 
rooms will be under watch. 

Rooms in Humanities where multi- 
media is available will also be secured. 
Students can expect to encounter more 
stringent access requirements to computers 
and rooms with multimedia as a result of 
the increase in theft on campus. 

"What this will do is keep honest 
people honest." Grannis said. "We've had 
almost no problems at all in the past eight 
years, but now there seems to be problems 
within the past few months. It's too bad 
because these thefts impact the students. 
Instead of money going to new equipment, 
we have to use it to buy what we already 
had." 

"It's a shame we have to do this sort 
of thing around here," Bianchi said. "But it 
has to be done." 



Senate delegates funds for diplomas 



By Brandee Tecson 
Staff Writer 



The Senate finally came to a decision 
about the diploma issue Monday night by 
agreeing to provide the $10,000 needed for 
improvements. 

With a vote of 10 to 1, Senate decided 
to allocate the appropriate funds, not to 
exceed Senate's remaining budget, for 
the purchase of new diplomas in the event 
that the CLU administration decides to not 
purchase them. 

The bill stated that the current and 
future students of CLU will be given ac- 
ceptable diplomas that are professional 
looking. 

"Hopefully this will show the ad- 
ministration that this is something we are 
passionate about," junior Holly Hoppman 
said. "We are not going to sit back and let 
this go." 

ASCLU President Nicole Hackbarth 
has been corresponding with the diploma 
committee, which said that the administra- 
tion simply does not have the necessary 
funds to make the designated changes. 

Senior Natalie Roberts believes the 
Senate made the right decision in allocat- 



ing the money. 

"One thing Senate always looks at is, 
'Are we putting money towards something 
that will last?' and this decision affects 
every student," Roberts said. "I'm proud 
to be a part of ASCLU Senate because we 
truly worked together and stepped up to the 
plate on this issue." 

After considering a proposal of possi- 
ble changes, administration denied several 
primary adjustments students were rally- 
ing for, including the use of a gold emboss, 
thicker paper quality and the removal of 
shading behind the California Lutheran 
University logo. 

However, two significant changes 
were approved, moving the seal back to 
the center of the diploma and increasing 
the font size. In addition, the diplomas will 
now be mailed out to graduates in a special 
cover. 

One alternative students recommend- 
ed was to get rid of the covers and use the 
saved money to pay for the changes. 

"[The covers] are nice, but at the same 
time, how many people are going to be put- 
ting that up on the wall?" sophomore sena- 
tor Dominic Storelli said. "That's $7,000 
that could have been allocated to a better 



"[The covers] are nice, 
but at the same time, how 
many people are going to 
be putting that up on the 
wall?" 

Dominic Storelli 
Sophomore senator 

diploma." 

Junior Cory Hughes initially spon- 
sored the bill that was passed and says that 
the new look is still unacceptable. 

"If I receive the same quality diploma 
next year that current seniors are getting, 
it will simply be filed away with all of my 
loan papers, because it will be no more ap- 
pealing to me than those are," Hughes said. 
"If the administration wants their alumni to 
be proud of CLU. then they need to start 
showing that they are proud, too, by issu- 
ing a 'frame-worthy' diploma." 

At-Large Senator Carly Coker would 
like to see the administration fully take on 
this issue and make some key decisions in 
the upcoming week. 

"[The administration] should be fully 



willing to fund a project that is such an im- 
portant issue to both undergrads and alum- 
ni," Coker said. "On the other hand, I do 
not believe that the seniors this year should 
suffer because the administration cannot 
find the funds to pay for the changes." 

Freshman Kacey Brackney hopes that 
future diplomas will reflect more of the 
students' desires. 

"The current diplomas are simply not 
up to par with other higher education insti- 
tutions as well as high schools," Brackney 
said. "1 was glad that they agreed to make 
some changes, but 1 am afraid that they are 
not enough." 

Junior Adam Jussell was one of three 
senators who abstained from voting on the 
issue. 

"I think it is important that we support 
the changes in the diploma, but I think [the 
bill] was too much, too soon. We had to 
make this decision within a really short 
time period," Jussell said. "I hope we can 
come to an agreement with the administra- 
tion to obtain quality diplomas that speak 
volumes for the individual achievements 
and for Cal Lutheran." 

Jussel said more student feedback is 
needed on the issue. 



2 The Echo 



Calendar 



March 19,2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 




today 

march 19 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 




Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Rotaract Club Meeting 

Overton Hall 
8 p.m. 






Common Ground 
Chapel _3* 

9:11 p.m. *fz 

^ i v > .. 



friday 

march 20 



Spring Break!.'.' 

Starts at 4 p.m. 

Classes Resume Monday, March 31 



STAFFORD LOAN EXIT COUNSELING 

All students who are graduating, transferring or leaving school after the Spring 2003 or Summer 2003 terms, and have received Stafford Loans 
are required by Federal regulations to attend Loan Exit Counseling. Loan Exit Counseling provides valuable and important information on pre 
paying, postponing or deferring loan payments, as well as loan consolidation, establishing good credit guidelines and government regulations. 

The Financial Aid Office will offer four counseling sessions on Monday, April -7, 2003 at 10 a.m. or 11:30 a.m., and 4 p.m. or 5:30 p.m. All four 
sessions will be held in the Preus-Brandt Forum (located next to the Pearson Library). Attendance is mandatory for all Stafford Loan recipients 
To schedule attendance at one of the four sessions, please call the Financial Aid Office at (805) 493-3115. This will enable us to have your loar 
information available at the appropriate session. 

Exit packet materials will be provided at each session; however, you should bring a pen, driver's license number and the name and 



address of nearest relative and two personal references not associated with CLU. 

If you are unable to attend any of the above mentioned sessions, please contact our office to make others arrangements to complete the Federal 
requirements. 



Have a GREAT 




and be SAFE!!! 



QSGEQ 



Ser,vicciRe:aii'estea 1 !f. J i:l 



classifieds 



Summer Dav (amp Help Needed: 

Seeking General Counselors & Specialist 

Instructors. Located just 20 minutes from 

CLU Staff can earn $2800-3500+ for the 

summer working \\l children outdoors! 

If interested, call; 

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visit: www.workatcamp.com 



Work From Home: Do you have a 
nose for business? Need money? Work 
from home! Wc tram you. Order our free 
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If interested, call or email: 

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Classified ads can be placed on 

the Calendar page for a flat rate 

regardless of word count. Discount 

available for multiple issue orders. 

Ads are subject to editing for content 

& clarity. 

Call: 

(805) 493-3865 



When was the last time you scrubbed your bathroom toilet, 

removed the mold from your bathroom ceiling or scrubbed 

the dried hairspray layers from the bathroom counter? 

When was the last time you mopped your kitchen floor, 

cleared the grease from your stove or removed the old 

food that now sticks to your kitchen sink? 

Well, if you still haven't managed to do it, think about 
hiring Marriott Services to help you out. 

The Apartments and Kramer residents could have their bath- 
room and kitchen cleaned twice a month for $75/month 
and 
All other dormitories could have their bathrooms cleaned twice 
a month for $50/month. 

Cut along the clotl line 



'Do you think those arc reasonable prices? 

If not, tell us a reasonable price for ... 
The Apartments and Kramer 

> All other dormitories 

J Fill in, cut this out and mail to the ECHO at mailbox #3650 



The Math Lab at California 



Lutheran University 

Why pay high prices for private 

math tutors when you can get 

tutored for free? 

At the Math Lab we offer FREE 

tutoring for all math from basic 

Algebra to Calculus and beyond! 

Our location is in the F building 
room 10, in between the Ed/Tech 
center and the D building. Our 
hours are always Sunday through 
Thursday from 7-10 p.m. 

We have laptops available for use. 
The tutors are friendly AND cool! 
Please take advantage of our 
services!! Come to get tutored 
study or just hang out! 



Improve your test scores NOW!! 




Questions? 
Contact Dr. Garcia at X3276 





HaPPy21st BiRtHdaY MiCheLeH! 

Pshell. 

First of all. you are a retard!! .0 J/k No, but really, I hope you have the most 
WONDERFUL birthday in sin city! You have been a wonderful friend, roommate and 
psychiatrist for my insane self these past three years (even though you are the one 
that drove me crazy, hehehe) Any who, 1 Just wanted to say I Love You and because my 
singing voice is crappy, i'll write it out to you: 

Happy Birthday to You, Happy Birthday to You, Happy Birthday dear Michele, Happy 
Birthday to You!!!! 

I love You, Yvette akajyy 





HOTEL/CASINO/US VEGAS 



March 19, 2003 



News 



Parking grows painful 



The Echo 3 



By Jennifer Pfaulch 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University is 
growing, and with the increasing number 
of people on campus, it seems that there is 
a shrinking number of parking spaces. 

For those who feel that finding a park- 
ing spot has become a problem, there is 
hope: but not in the immediate future. 

"We plan 349 spaces at the Sports and 
Fitness Center and 76 spaces at the planned 
residence hall. Both projects will not be 
complete until 2005-2006. No additional 
lots are in the foreseeable future," said 
Ryan Van Ommeren, director of facility 
operations and planning. 

"The east side of campus is not that 
bad," sophomore Resident Assistant Dom- 
inic Storelli said. 



"I chose to live on campus so that I did 
not have to deal with parking, but it's still a 
problem," senior Jennifer Creed said. 

"The parking situation is dismal. If Cal 
Lutheran wants to expand the student pop- 
ulation, it needs to find the funds to expand 
student parking on the south campus where 
students can easily get to their classes," 
history major Brenna Sandeen said. 

"I've worked here for eight years and 
I've never had a problem finding a parking 
spot," said Assistant Director of Student 
Life and Programs Sara Hartley. "But I un- 
derstand that students want parking close 
to where they live and to their classes." 

There is one thing to be thankful for 
in the midst of the parking mess many find 
themselves in each moming: students are 
not forced to pay for a parking spot they 
may or may not be able to find. 




Photograph by Markus Reinke 
Students crowded into parking spots along Memorial Parkway. Despite growth, new 
parking will not be available until at least 2005. 



Programs Board evaluates past events 



By Christa Hudson 
Staff Writer 



Programs Board experienced success 
with Siblings Weekend and strove to suc- 
ceed with Movie Night and the Lu Down. 
In their meeting on Monday, March 10, 
they discussed some of the final details to 
upcoming events. 

Siblings Weekend was a success, but 
Programs Board ran into a few difficulties. 

"We bought 230 tickets and had to 
turn 30 people away. It was confusing 
because Golf N* Stuff gave out tickets to 
CLU students who got there early, before 
we [Programs Board & RHA] arrived to 
pass out the tickets," said Xandra Mc- 
Connell. Programs Board and RHA had a 
list of those students who had signed up 
early [to guarantee them a spot] for Golf 
N' Stuff, and there was no way to tell if 
those students were among the 30 who 
received tickets early. Those students who 
were turned away had the option of buying 



a ticket at their own expense or going back 
home. Golf N' Stuff is in Ventura, Calif., 
and the students who were turned away 
were annoyed. 

"Ventura is very far to be turned away 
for an event, especially since most people 
are used to getting into Club Lu events," 
McConnell said. 

Future endeavors are underway to pre- 
vent any misunderstanding in the future. 

"We should consider drafting a Club 
Lu template for all contractual agreements 
made with Club Lu," Sally Sagen said. 

Movie night is still rousing debate. 
Finding a balance between high attendance 
and an effective community-building event 
is not easy, board members said. 

"It sounds like we are going with the 
Janss theater. We may get gift certificates 
redeemable for that night only to enhance 
community building," Sagen said. 

Board members agreed that buying 
1 50 tickets to two different movies was go- 
ing to be part of their plan for this event. 



"Ventura is very far to be 
turned away for an event, 
especially since most 
people are used to get- 
ting into Club Lu events." 

Xandra McConnell 
Board member 

Tickets to the movies will be given out 
on a first-come, first-served basis. Thus, 
students who arrive early will get to decide 
which movie to attend. 

One concern about the new approach 
to movie night is that students would only 
be receiving one free ticket. Previously, 
they were able to obtain up to two free 
movie tickets good for one year. 

The Lu Down may be held at Border- 
line, said Programs Board members. 

'i had a meeting with Rick [a repre- 
sentative] from Borderline and he said that 



if we prepaid for 250 tickets at $4 a piece, 
he would give us an additional 25 tickets 
free. Plus, each student would get a free 
drink. He also said that he might be able to 
get us an appetizer bar for one hour," board 
member Jackee Oshann said. 

It has yet to be put into writing and 
there was some concern from the board 
that the club was just trying to make a 
sale. 

One board member insisted that Bor- 
derline conduct its 21 and over carding 
system through CLU's birthday list. How- 
ever, there is serious doubt that they will 
add this extra security measure. Borderline 
currently requires valid identification of 
age to enter the roped-off bar area. Having 
Borderline host the Lu Down does have 
appeal. 

"CLU students sometimes like having 
others (non-CLU students) there because it 
gives them a chance to meet new people. 
Borderline typically houses 200 or so on a 
Friday night," Oshann said. 



Have a great 
Spring Break! 



Due to Spring Break, the 

Echo will not be published 

March 26 or April 2. 

The next issue will April 9. 





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News 



4 The Echo 



March 19,2003 



Kid Kaos wins CLW title 




Photograph by Laura Rodgcrs 
Wrestlers flaunt their best moves on the professional wrestling ring which was rented for the Club Lu event last Friday. 



Photograph by Ryan Mayfield 
CLU trainers carrying out Matt McCann 
after he was "injured" in the match. 



By Michele Hatler 
Editor In Chief 



The California Lutheran University 
gym was transformed into a professional 
wrestling ring for the second annual CLW 
held on Friday, March 14. The Programs 
Board sponsored the Club Lu event, and 
600 wrestling fans showed up. 

Junior Jimmy Fox came up with the 
idea to have a wrestling event on campus 
and took the idea to the Programs Board. 

"I wanted an excuse to wrestle in 
a professional wrestling ring. I've been 
watching wrestling since 1 was a little kid," 
Fox said. 

The CLW was a two-team competi- 
tion. The Red team and Black team fought 
seven matches. The wrestlers practiced for 
two weeks in advance to leam the choreo- 
graphed moves. Jimmy Fox coordinated 
the matches. The wrestlers were respon- 
sible for their lines. 

The production aspect of the program 
was improved from last year. A fire-jug- 
gling sidekick accompanied Island Child 
(senior Nick Namba) during his perfor- 
mance. A special lighting arrangement was 



designed to display only the ring. A ring- 
side camera was also part of the show. 

"This year, there were new faces which 
added to the story lines and kept everyone 
guessing," sophomore CJ Kridner said. 

This was the first show that had a fe- 
male match. Sophomore Lindsay Bufl<in 
and junior Pam Clark fought for their 
teams. 

"The girls gave a very entertaining 
performance," sophomore Dan Ham said. 
"They were aggressive and stayed in char- 
acter." 

"I almost didn't want to go when I 
heard Kritter [Brendon Kinion] wasn't go- 
ing to be there, but I'm glad I did because 
he ended up being the star of the show," 
sophomore Ryan Mayfield said. 

Kritter jumped into the showdown be- 
tween Fox and "Too Hot" Scott Sandbom 
(senior Sean Porter) and took control of 
the match. Kritter defeated both Fox and 
Sandborn and the victory gave him the title 
of "CLW Commissioner." 

Initially, the Red team was thought to 
have the match, but Kid Kaos (junior Chad 
Brown) turned against the Red team during 
the final ceremony, and secured victory for 
the Black team The Black team also won 




Photograph by Ryan Mayfield 
(From left to right) CJ Kridner. Ryan Hodges and Abe Choi before last Friday night s 
CLW wrestling match. Hodges team won the contest. 

Marty Slimak. Hirsch was replaced by 
William Payne, a trained wrestler and ref- 



last year's match. 

President-elect Robert Boland, one of 
last year's announcers, made a special ap- 
pearance during the hour and a half long 
event. 

Junior Jason Hirsch, a baseball player, 
was unexpectedly pulled out of the event 
on advice from the CLU baseball coach, 



eree for the EWF. 

Currently plans are underway for a 
third addition of CLW to be held next year, 
Fox said. 

"We hope that the event was succesful 
enough to do again next year," Fox said. 



10 Travel Tips for Students 

1. Make sure you have a signed, valid passport and visas, if required. Also, before you 
go, fill in the emergency information page of your passport! 

2. Read the Consular Information Sheets for the countries you plan to visit. 

3. Leave copies of your itinerary, passport data page and visas with family or friends 
at home, so that you can be contacted in case of emergency. Keep your host program 
informed about your whereabouts. 

X. Make sure you have insurance that will cover your emergency medical needs while 
you are overseas. 

5. Familiarize yourself with local laws and customs of the countries to which you are 
traveling. Remember, while in a foreign country, you are subject to its laws! 

6. Do no leave your luggage unattended in public areas, and never accept packages from 
strangers. 

7. While abroad, avoid using illicit drugs or drinking excessive amounts of alcoholic 
beverages, and associating with people who do. 

8. Do not become a target for thieves by wearing conspicuous clothing and expensive 
jewelry, and do not carry excessive amounts of cash or unnecessary credit cards. 

9. Deal only with authorized agents when you exchange money to avoid violating local 
laws. 

10. When overseas, avoid demonstrations and other situations that may become unruly 
or where anti-American sentiments may be expressed. 

(From the U.S. Department of Stale. Bureau of Consular Affairs) 



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March 19, 2003 



Features 



The Echo 5 . 



CLU's study abroad program 



By Leah Sanchez 
Staff writer 



Have you ever wanted to escape the 
California hustle and bustle to experience 
life in a completely different part of the 
world while still getting a great educa- 
tion? California Lutheran University of- 
fers any interested students study abroad 
programs at a variety of different destina- 
tions where they can travel and receive 
CLU academic credits while experiencing 
a whole new part of the world. 

The study abroad center offers two 
different types of programs to CLU stu- 
dents. The first set of programs are the 
direct exchange programs, in which state 
and federal aid can be taken along, as 
well as any aid CLU offers, like academic 
scholarships. The fees for this program are 
the same as the regular tuition at CLU. 

Locations include Hong Kong Bap- 
tist University, Haagse Hogeschool in 
the Netherlands and Wagner College in 
Staten Island, New York. One student 
from one of the eligible schools comes to 
CLU while a student from CLU goes to 
the other school. 

The second types of programs are the 



non-CLU approved programs that are not 
exchanges, but known as a "brokered pro- 
gram," like Australearn. In these instanc- 
es, state and federal aid are taken, but no 
CLU aid can be used. The programs in- 
clude Goldsmith University of London in 
England, and the semester at sea, in which 
students spend a year traveling on a ship 
and stopping at numerous countries. 

"What people don't know is that 
studying abroad is usually not more ex- 
pensive than attending CLU, but instead, 
sometimes costs a little less," said Dr. 
Herbert Gooch, director of the office of 
study abroad. 

Some other programs that CLU of- 
fers are the interim trips, which are two to 
three weeks long with professors. 

Currently there are 22 CLU students 
studying abroad in places ranging from 
Thailand to South Africa. Polls were 
taken of two different groups of CLU stu- 
dents: a small group who had participated 
in study abroad programs and a larger 
group who hadn't participated. The group 
that hadn't participated said that some of 
their first choices of places to go were the 
European countries like France, Italy and 
Spain for the semester trips, and English- 
speaking countries such as Australia, New 



Zealand, and Ireland for the interim trips. 
Some of the concerns of the group that 
hadn't gone were their personal situations 
and not wanting to leave their families, 
boyfriends or girlfriends. Another main 
concern was about financial aid and ap- 
plying to the program. 

The group that had already gone 
abroad and come back was asked how 
significant a part of their college educa- 
tion their trip was. Ninety-one percent felt 
that it was the most significant experience 
in their four years of college. 

From the polls the study abroad cen- 
ter found that there is a very high demand 
for more summer programs, especially for 
athletes and residence advisers who have 
obligations on campus and can't experi- 
ence studying abroad during the regular 
academic year. Forty-eight percent of the 
students who haven't gone would prefer a 
summer program over a regular one. The 
study abroad center is working hard to get 
this to be a bigger part of their program 
so that more students will want to par- 
ticipate. 

"I'd like to see CLU have a fully 
staffed, expanded study abroad center 
where students and professors can go 
not only for planning their trip, but also 



reentering when they come back," said 
Cody Hartley, director of undergraduate 
admissions. 

According to Kacey Brackney, mem- 
ber of the CLU student government, the 
administration hasn't paid much attention 
to the study abroad program up until now. 
She wrote a resolution last fall that passed 
in which she suggested to the administra- 
tion that they should hire more full-time 
help in the study abroad center so that the 
students have more help. 

"A main suggestion that I have is that 
the administration should somehow start 
a scholarship fund for students interested 
in studying abroad and let alumni know 
that they can donate money to it," Brack- 
ney said. 

"It makes sense that if we're going to 
support our mission statement, which is 
educating leaders for a global society, we 
need to make this an institutional prior- 
ity," Hartley said. 

"1 have found that California students 
don't want to leave and study somewhere 
else." said Gooch. "I think that you are a 
fool if you don't take the opportunity and 
participate in the study abroad programs 
provided." 



CLU students travel to Italy 



By Heather Molloy 

PROOFREADER 



Several California Lutheran University 
students traveled to Italy for two weeks 
over the winter break as part of the travel 
interim courses offered by the CLU study 
abroad program. The course was open to 
both students and non-students with the 
option of taking the course for university 
credit. 

CLU's geology professor, Dr. William 
Bilodeau was the advisor of the trip. Bi- 
lodeau held meetings for the trip's partici- 



pants to familiarize them with the language 
and culture of Italy. The group departed 
LAX on January 1, 2003 and arrived at 
their destination in Sicily nearly two days 
later. The trip was designed to incorporate 
geological studies and therefore, included 
excursions to the active volcanoes, Mount 
Etna and Mount Vesuvius. The group hiked 
to the top of Mount Vesuvius and looked 
into the volcano, which last erupted in 
1944. The group, however, was not able to 
hike Mount Etna as planned because it was 
erupting hot lava. 



The course's itinerary also included 
trips to several archeological sites such 
as: The Valley of the Temples, the Cave 
of Dionysus' Ear and the ancient ruins at 
Pompeii. 

The trip concluded with two very 
busy days in Rome. The students visited 
the Trevi Fountain, St. Peter's Basilica in 
Vatican City and the Colosseum, where 
gladiatorial events took place in early Ro- 
man history. 

This interim travel course was a good 
opportunity for busy CLU students. 



"I saw a flier hanging around campus 
and thought that 1 might be interested," 
said freshman Nicky Wolhaupter. "Since 
I didn't think that I would be able to fit 
in a full semester of studying abroad into 
my schedule, this two-week adventure was 
perfect." 

The course also offered lessons on 
culture as well. Junior Kristina Lambert 
said that her favorite aspect of the trip was 
getting to know the locals. 

They're not much different from us." 
Lambert said. 




Photograph courtesy of Heather Molloy 
When in Rome do as the Romans do! Students smile big for the camera. 



Photograph courtesy of I leather Molloy 
Students visited the Colosseum, home to past gladilorial events and laurel wreathes, in 
Rome. 



Second multimedia Interactive Arts Festival 



By Trevor Kelley 
Staff writer 



On Sunday, April 6. in front of the 
Humanities building on campus, three pro- 
jection screens will display the work of six 
Cal Lutheran students as part of the annual 
Interactive Arts Festival. 

Broadcasted onto those screens will be 
what multimedia professor Tim Hengst re- 
fers to as "surround videos" — that is, videos 
that are displayed as a single scene, though 
split, between various areas of projection. 
Imagine a photo of a sunset, for instance. 



cut up into three different pieces. Hengst 
hopes that they will be able to do this outside 
of the Humanities building during the day. 
It's a completely new and risky proposition 
for Hengst. 

"There's still some issues of whether or 
not we can actually pull it off," Hengst said, 
in the midst of preproduction for the event. 
"But if we can, it should be great." 

After an inaugural run last year, the 
Interactive Arts Festival is back at CLU 
to display the works of many multimedia 
students. Following the opening-day festivi- 
ties, the convention's exhibits will later be 



displayed in the Kwan Fong Art Gallery in 
the Humanities building. Inside, students 
will be able to view projects in the fields 
of interactive media, web design and digital 
art. The success of last year's exhibit spurred 
Hengst on to bigger and better things for a 
follow-up. 

"It's brought a lot of interest to the 
department," Hengst said. "We're trying to 
provide a venue to showcase technological 
advancements on campus ... so far, we've 
gotten a very positive response." 

The multimedia arts festival will also 
feature multimedia music exhibits. Over- 



seen by music professor Mark Spraggins, the 
exhibits will include "sound sculptures" cre- 
ated by students in his digital music course. 

"(The festival) will be whatever they 
make of it," Spraggins said. "It's a way for 
their performances to be heard. Even if it's 
one person going to a kiosk and playing with 
it or using visual work and listening to sound 
sculptures." 

"And if that's not enough, Hengst said 
jokingly, "Tell everyone to come down for 
the free snacks!" 

The Interactive Arts Festival will run 
from April 6 through April 12. 



6 The Echo 



Features 



March 19, 2003 



Campus Quotes 



Where's your dream place to live? 




Kevin Andreen, history major, class of 2004 Michelle Courtenay, psychology major, Satoshi Mitsumori, biology major, class Valerie Vichules, Undeclared Class of 

class of 2004 of 2004 2006 

"I would live in Reykjavik, Iceland, because 

it has an awesome climate, it's a small re- "I would live in Ireland because Ireland is "I would live in Hawaii because the girls "I would live in Fiji because they have 
mote island and has a nice hometown feel." heaven." are hot." gre en water and they make good apples 

and water." 




Carmen Helo. biolog 
2004 



r, class of Juana Torres, poli sci/environmental stud- Kevin Sterling, drama major, class of Elizabeth Hergert, art major, class of 



ies major, class of 2004 



2005 



"The Ecuadorian jungle, because nobody "I would live in an isolated area where "I would live in California, because it has 
wears clothes and you don't have to worry there are no people around because I have the nicest weather." 
about the latest fashion." lived in a city all my life." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jon Gonzales 



2004 

"I'd live in Italy, because it's a really dif- 
ferent culture and I like to live among the 
artists." 



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72 







ACROSS 


54 Legal point 


22 Chocolate pie 


1 7th Greek letter 


56 Rocks at top of hill 


25 Tear 


4 Inevitable event 


58 Shine floor 




8 Number 


59 Roof of mouth 


29 Plant seed 


11 Image 


62 Banish 


30 Before (poetic) 


12 Above 


64 Two (Roman) 


32 Age 


1 3 Fish eggs 


65 Compass point (abbr ) 


34 Vietnam offensive 


14 Two (pref ) 


66 Singing voice 


36 Federal tax agency (abbr ) 


15 Shellac ingredient 


68 Mother's sister 


37 2,000 lbs 


17 Fur bearing animal 


70 Make good on debt 


39 Iron 


19 Frozen water 


71 Yacht 


40 Tattered cloth 


21 Chewed again food 


72 Teaspoons (abbr.) 


43 Cereal 


23 Plant fluid 






24 Asterisk 


DOWN 


48 Green vegetable 


26 Dry, as in wine 


1 Decree 




28 Flower 


2 Preposition 


52 Pours 


31 Unite 


3 Total 




33 Drunkard 


4 Make plain to see 


55 Pierce 


35 Beetle 


5 1 1th Hebrew month 




36 Indefinite pronoun 


6 Prepare golf ball 


59 Energy 


38 Thrive 


7 Makes mistakes 


60 Collection 


41 Plural pronoun 


8 Three-legged stand 


61 70s rock group 


42 Steal 


9 Forever 


63 Rodent 


44 Is (plural} 


10 Born 


67 Tantalum symbol 


45 Pave 


1 1 Wading bird 


69 Preposition 


47 Break suddenly 


16 Actinium symbol 




49 Make a mislake 


1 8 Damage 




51 Stab 


20 Consume 





March 19, 2003 



Arts 

Creative Genius presents "A 
Night Away From Reality TV 



The Echo 7 



55 



By Gianina Lomedico 
Staff writer 



Imagine a 24-year-old who is young, 
vibrant, and the virgin, enjoying the free- 
dom of living her life in New York City, 
in a 10-minute play titled "Dancing with 
a Devil." She is proud of her abstinence 
until one vulnerable night when she is 
raped in the privacy of her own home. 
She relives this moment each day for the 
rest of her life. 

"This was my first production in 
which 1 saw 10-minute plays," freshman 
Carina Magana said. "Overall, everything 
was portrayed very realistically. It made 



you feel like you were in that situation." 

On Thursday, March 13 through Sat- 
urday, March 15 at 8 p.m. in the Preus- 
Brandt Forum, 14 students in the drama 
capstone class each directed a 10-minute 
play. The students formed a company 
called Creative Genius Productions and 
decided on the theme, "A Night Away 
from Reality TV." The production al- 
lowed the students to use what they have 
learned as drama majors. 

Each of the 14 directors was in charge 
of his or her own play. The plays flip- 
flopped, having different performances 
each night. On Thursday night, pjjjs such 
as "Go Look," directed by juniorToannie 



"Adaptation 



By Trevor Kelley 
Staff writer 



Let's face it: there's no way that "Ad- 
aptation" is going to win the Oscar for 
Best Picture. It's far too clever, bizarre 
and complex to ever win the most cov- 
eted of little gold statuettes when they're 
handed out on March 23. But, believe it or 
not, that's actually a great compliment. 

Often, the greatest art is that which 
goes overlooked. "Adaptation" is unde- 
niably great art, a mirror held up to the 
inner psyche of human neurosis and our 
innate longing for happiness. 

Which is to say it's a great, touching 
movie. But here's the problem: it's also 
really, really weird. 

Directed by the same writer/director 
team who created the equally bizarre 
"Being John Malkovich" (long-time 
music video auteur Spike Jonze and off- 
the-cuff writer Charlie Kaufman), "Ad- 
aptation" is the story of an aging New 
York writer (played by Meryl Streep) 
who falls in love with a swamp farmer 
(played by Chris Cooper), who also labs 



out an organic form of cocaine. In the 
middle of all of this is Nicholas Cage, 
who plays not one, but two of the best 
roles in his entire career. Cage's portrayal 
of the neurotic, chronically masturbating 
Charlie Kaufman, as well as his anxious, 
head-in-the-clouds brother Donald (both 
of whom are loosely based on the film's 
actual writer), is probably his best since 
1987"s "Raising Arizona," not to mention 
his most peculiar. This fits in perfectly 
with the film's complicated plot, which 
follows these two parallel stories as they 
ultimately intersect in the middle of a 
swamp full of man-eating alligators. 

Sounds strange? It is. 

Perhaps a little too strange: "Adap- 
tation" probably won't win this coming 
Sunday, but that doesn't refute the fact 
that it's one of the year's best films. And, 
this year, when Jonze and Kaufman hand 
out the tired and predictable line that it 
was an honor to be nominated, they may 
actually be telling the truth. 

After all. the fact that a movie this 
strange was even acknowledged by the 
Academy is something to be commended. 



"My Big Fat Greek Wedding" 



By Cameron Brown 
Staff writer 



L 'My Big Fat Greek Wedding," directed 
by Joel Zwick, made its debut in April 2002. 
Little did people know that the movie would 
leave such a lasting impression on all of its 
viewers. 

Nominated for Best Picture of the 
Year, "My Big Fat Greek Wedding" has 
sold movie fans with its comedic charm, 
romantic theme and interesting perspective 
on Greek culture. 

Chicago's Nia Vardalos has adapted 
her critically acclaimed, autobiographical, 
one-woman show into a human comedy 
that strikes a universal chord. As the story 
begins, Vardalos plays Toula, a lethargic 
30-year-old virgin working in her father's 
Greek restaurant. 

"You better get married," her father 
says. "You're looking old." 

Since childhood, her pare nts— p lay ed 
by Michael Consantine and Lainie Ka- 
zan — have told her that Greek girls have 
three duties in life: marry Greek boys, make 
Greek babies and feed everyone. 



But it's not that easy. Toula's a big, 
inelegant Greek in a world of tiny, blond 
Barbies. Realizing she's stuck in a pothole, 
Toula enrolls in a computer class at a nearby 
college. She also puts on some makeup, buys 
fashionable clothes, discovers contact lenses 
and lands a job in her aunt's travel agency. 

Meanwhile, she's caught the eye of 
a tall, handsome, educated schoolteacher. 
Ian Miller (John Corbett of TV's "Sex and 
the City"). However, there is one problem: 
he's not Greek. Even Miller's suave and 
charismatic charm isn't enough to persuade 
Toula's parents that Miller is the right man 
for her. 

Following an ongoing, drawn-out line 
of events that are necessary to make Miller 
as Greek as possible. Miller and Toula final- 
ly receive the approval of her parents. Soon 
after. Miller and Toula decide to get married, 
but, of course, in the Greek church. 

It turns out that happiness is finally 
attained by marriage. The wedding is cel- 
ebrated with a large smorgasbord of food, 
festive music and an entourage of extended 
family. Ian and Toula live happily ever after 
in a quaint-house located directly next to her 
parent's — a gift given by Toula's father. 



Bryant, and "Dancing with a Devil," di- 
rected by senior Annemarie Bjordal, were 
shown. "Go Look" featured a couple in 
the wilderness camping that experience 
some of their personal fears. 

The directors were involved with 
putting on the whole show. Some of their 
jobs included lights, sound, advertising, 
costumes, props and working on set piec- 
es. The directors created prompt books, 
which contain notes about the play. Each 
director chose his or her own script, paid 
royalties on time and secured rights by 
writing a letter to the publisher. 

Michael Arndt, chair of the drama de- 
partment, believes that the performances 



gave the student directors a chance to use 
the principles they learned in class and 
how to relate them in real life. 

"It is a real-world experience for the 
students to show their work to different 
audiences," Arndt said. "The students are 
doing the performance for a grade, but it 
goes well beyond the class." 

"It is a different perspective to work 
on all sides of a play," said Bjordal. 
"There is a lot of technical work involved 
when directing a play. The technical work 
allows you to find a way to achieve an 
artistic expression." 



"The Pianist" 



By Trevor Kelley 
Staff writer 



A front-runner if there ever was one, 
Roman Polanski's "The Pianist" is the 
film most critics are predicting to walk 
away with the Best Picture statuette this 
Sunday. 

Featuring an ensemble cast lead by 
Adrien Brody (who turns a stunning 
portrayal of real-life Holocaust survivor 
and musician Wladyslaw Szpilman) and 
rounded out by strong supporting per- 
formances by Emilia Fox, Ed Stoppard 
and Michal Sebrowski, "The Pianist" is 
a stunning World War ll-era picture that 
was spurred on by the personal connection 
Polanski brought to the film (he himself 
is a Holocaust survivor). Throughout its 
nearly three-hour running time, "The Pia- 
nist" emerges as a surprisingly heroic tale 
of a man who is able to endure the loss 
of his family, his country and his way of 
living by silencing the outside world and 
turning to the music he has inside. Early 
advertisements for the film read: "Music 
was his passion, survival was his master- 
piece." Clearly, "The Pianist" is both a 



masterpiece for Polaski and a passion in 
which he has invested much of himeslf in. 
And for this, surely, he will be rewarded. 

That doesn't mean "The Pianist" was 
the best film of the year, because, hon- 
estly, it wasn't. As is the case with other 
over-the-top Holocaust films (see Steven 
Spieliberg's equally applauded 1996 epic 
"Schindler's List"), "The Pianist" is a 
long, heart-wrenching look at one of the 
most tragic events of the last two centu- 
ries, suffering from its severity and the 
exhuastive time spent in this horrific era. 
While, at its core, "The Pianist" may be 
a film about hope and survival, it's often 
easy to confuse its message with its de- 
livery. 

With that in mind, "The Pianist" isn't 
for everyone. If your idea of depth is 
"Dude, Where's My Car?," chances are 
you won't make it past the film's first half- 
hour. However, if emotional and historical 
imploring is something that interests you, 
"The Pianist" may not suffer too much 
from its shortcomings. From my seat at 
the theater, it was a good movie that could 
have been a great one, but Best Picture 
of the year is something it most certainly 
isn't. 



ISSy says navigating a 
hard drive on a Mac is 



As a Mac OSX user, you have un- 
doubtedly found multiple handy ways the 
Finder lets you navigate your hard drive. 
While icon view, list view, and column 
view (ISSy's favorite) each have their 
own benefits, there is yet another way to 
quickly navigate the drive's file structure. 
And the best part is it lets you get into the 
deepest, darkest areas of your drive with- 
out opening a single window! Here is how 
to do4t: 

First, click and hold on the hard 
drive icon on the desktop or any Finder 
window. 

Next, drag that icon down to the 
right-hand side of the Dock. The Dock will 
expand to let you know where the shortcut 
will appear. When you are happy with its 
placement, let go of the mouse button. A 
shortcut to your hard drive will now show 
up in the Dock. 

Now, to navigate your hard drive, 
click and hold the mouse button on the 
icon (you can also control+click or right 



click). A menu will spring up from your 
drive icon, allowing you to go as deep as 
five folders. Find what you want and let 
go. The application or folder will open and 
the menu tucks away, giving you all the ac- 
cess to your drive with none of the mess. 

Make use of this neat little shortcut. 
By the way, you can also do it with any 
folder you want too! Give it a try! If you 
don't like it, just drag the icon out of the 
Dock. 

If you have any questions regarding 
navigating your hard drive, contact the 
Help Desk at h«*p@clunet.edu or exten- 
sion 3698. 




ISSy's 

PUTER 
TIPS 



8 The Echo 



Opinion 



March 19.2003 



o 



fc 



Oh 

o 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor 

are welcome on any topic 

related to CLU or The Echo. 

Letters must include the 

writer's name, year/position 

and major/department. 

Letters are subject to editing 
for space and clarity. 



Printing 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be published 
on the following dates: 

April 2, 2003 
April 23, 2003 
May 14, 2003 



Reimbursed for inconveniences 




By Michele Hatler 
Editor in chief 



Unfortunately, no matter how pre- 
pared we are or how well things have been 
planned, undesirable incidents still occur. 
Many California Lutheran students have 
been on the receiving end of many unin- 
tentional, yet inconvenient, problems that 
keep happening to our residence halls. 

Scheduled and unscheduled power 
outages have occurred several times 
throughout the 2002-2003 school year. The 
unscheduled power outage that removed 



power in residence halls, academic build- 
ings and the cafeteria occurred because of 
a problem with the education and technol- 
ogy building. The following outages have 
been a direct result of the first outage in 
an effort to fix the new problems that oc- 
curred. 

We had power problems when it was 
hot and we were in an energy crisis. Many 
of us had to deal with no air-conditioning, 
worrying about what was in the fridge and 
trying to get moved in and settled with no 
power. 

Last week we had our water turned off 
because of a ruptured line and had no way 
to flush the toilet, wash our hands or even 
brush our teeth before bed. 

I realize that none of this could be 
planned for. No one is at fault for any of 
it. Over time, materials get old and go bad. 
No matter how old or new something is 
there can always be a problem. 

The biggest problem 1 have is that all 
these things happen to those of us who live 
on campus, and there's nothing that we can 
do about it. We've had to eat cold chicken 



for breakfast during power outages, throw 
out food that was in the freezer, and urinate 
in toilets that can't be flushed. And what 
could we do about it? 

I think that there should be some type 
of reimbursement for the residents of CLU 
when things like this happen. We pay a 
considerate amount of money to live in 
the residence halls, and we have to pay 
the same amount whether we are living 
without electricity or running water. The 
amount for room and board includes all of 
these accommodations; yet, we are paying 
for resources that we have to do without. 
Many of us don't have the option of going 
anywhere else when something like this 
happens. 

Since these things occur whether or 
not we foresee them, there should be some 
compensation for the students who have 
to endure them. Possible reimbursements 
could be extra book money, a discount on 
our room and board or free laundry money. 
I think something should be offered to 
compensate students for the inconvenienc- 
es we have to go through. 



Staff Editorials 



Take your rights seriously 




By Josh Simmons 
Staff Writer 



Most young Americans take their 
rights for granted. Most people in the 
world do not enjoy freedom of speech, 
freedom of press and the countless other 
rights granted to us. This is one of the 
reasons that we are trying to liberate the 
Iraqi people from the oppressive Saddam 
Hussein. He kills those who dissent from 
his opinions, and not even his own family 
is spared; he killed his own son-in-law. 

Many students I talk to are not reg- 



istered to vote. How can you be a viable 
member of the community if your opinion 
is not voiced through voting? 

Many youth today believe that only 
those in government power make political 
decisions, but they fail to realize that they 
affect government by voting and voicing 
their opinions. For example, the anti - war 
protesters usually regard war as a tragedy, 
not as a potential force of good and change. 
They don't know about foreign policy; 
they don't see the opportunities for last- 
ing peace and stability that can come from 
stable governments around the world. 

Appeasement doesn't work; British 
Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain ap- 
peased Adolph Hitler and claimed that we 
would have "peace for our time." Hitler 
saw that Europe was weak and soon after 
launched the attack that overran most of 
Europe*.. If Europe had been tough on Hit- 
ler and the Germans during the late 1930s, 
World War II may have been prevented. 

The United States is an example of a 
successful government. Many countries 
are older than the United States, but we 



have the longest standing constitution. 
Other forms of governments have risen and 
fallen, but a constitutional republic with 
unalienable rights and democracy is the 
best form. It is much easier to make deals 
with democracies than with dictatorships. 

According to Pablo Picasso, "Every 
act of creation is first of all an act of de- 
struction." War with Iraq will be ugly. All 
war is, but hopefully a stable, free country 
will stand where an oppressive brutal one 
is now. 

Youth must participate in the political 
process; they must exercise their rights as 
a demonstration of freedom around the 
world. 

Remember that ASCLU elections 
will be held on March 18th and March 
19th. Also, be sure to check out the sec- 
retary of state's Web site to register to 
vote and see information about upcom- 
ing elections: http://ss.ca.gov/. Only by 
making your voice heard can you be a 
force for change. Questions or comments: 
jsimmon@clunet.edu 



The 



Echo Staff 



Michele Hatler 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/ 
Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 

Business Manager 

Brett Rowland 

News Editor 

Karen Peterson 
Arts & Features Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 

. Opinon Editor 



Katie Bashaw 
Sports Editor 

Scott Gasperino 
Photo Editor 

Eric Ingemunson 

Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Heather Molloy 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes comments 
on its articles as well as on the newspaper itself. However, the 
staff acknowledges that opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, 
.editorials, letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by die advertis- 
ing party of otherwise specifically stated, advertisements in The 
Echo are inserted by commercial activities or ventures identi- 
fied in the advertisements dicmsclves and not by California 
Lutheran University. Advertising material printed herein is 
solely for informational purposes. Such printing is not to be 
construed as a written and implied sponsorship, endorsement, 
or investigation of such commercial enterprises or ventures- 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (80S) 493-3865. 



Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief, The Echo, California Lutheran Univer- 
sity, 60 West Olsen Road. Thousand Oaks, CA 92360-2787. 
Telephone: (805) 493-3465; Fan: (805) 4933327: E-mail 
echo@clunct.edu. 



March 19,2003 



Opinion 



The Echo 9 



Of defense, defiance and definitions 



By Adam Martin 
STAFF WRITER 



Terrorism: Pronunciation: l ter-r-"i-zm 

Function: noun: the systematic use of terror especially 
as a means of coercion (Terror: violence (as bombing) 
committed by groups in order to intimidate a population or 
government into granting their demands insurrection and 
revolutionary terror) 

Warfare. Pronunciation: l wor-"far, -"fer 

Function: noun: I: military operations between en- 
emies: (see "hostilities," "war"; also : an activity under- 
taken by a political unit (as a nation) to weaken or destroy 
another" (Merriam-Webster Dictionary) 

These are what the dictionary lists as the definitions 
of "terrorism" and "warfare." It puzzles me on a regular 
basis; the more I study these two definitions, the less of 
a difference I see between them. The intention of both is 
political and psychological; both rely upon violence to 
achieve their ends. It seems that the major differences be- 
tween them are: 1 ) "terrorism" is used to label such actions 
taken by a minority against a majority, usually involving 
covert tactics; and 2) "warfare" is socially legitimized vio- 
lence, with tacit or overt approval by the state. 

The armed forces have long been the most honored 
and sacred branches of government in any nation, regard- 
less of time or place. One popular saying, voiced with 
similar sentiments across Europe during World War I, said 
"dulce decorum est pro patria mori." Roughly translated, I 
believe it means, "how sweet it is to die for one's country." 
How sweet indeed. No one would doubt the immense no- 
bility of those soldiers who fought for the Allies at D-Day, 
or those who liberated the Nazi concentration camps. 

To speak against the armed forces or their missions, 
however, is to be labeled unpatriotic and, in some extreme 



cases, "giving aid and comfort to the enemy." This tends 
to happen whether a nation's armed forces are engaged in 
noble or ignoble purposes. 

Around the beginning of the 20th century, American 
forces spent a few hellish years waging jungle warfare 
in the Philippines in a campaign that looked like an eerie 
precursor to Vietnam. Persecution of civilians and water 
torture were common; few Americans decided to be unpa- 
triotic and ask their government just what its business was 
in the Philippines. Was this warfare or terrorism? 

During the 1980s, we were informed of the grave 
threat to democracy posed by the government of Nicara- 
gua, a party called the "Sandinistas." U.S. support was ea- 
gerly given to "freedom fighters" named "Contras." Some 
have labeled the Contras themselves as terrorists with U.S. 
backing, given their tactics and conduct. Was this warfare 
or terrorism? 

That brings us to' warfare and/or terrorism as possible 
tools of patriotism. It is no secret that a nation finds itself 
imbued the most with patriotic sentiment during times of 
crisis. This could mean September 1 1 , 200 1 , for the United 
States; it could mean the People's Republic of China dur- 
ing their protracted revolution. If a severe drought of 
patriotism occurs in a nation for some reason, perhaps 
wars are a solution. While a nation may not seem noble in 
day-to-day circumstances, historic epic battles and wars of 
civilization increase our love of the fatherland, or moth- 
erland, or homeland. Patriotism, like absence, makes the 
heart grow fonder, it would seem. 

Again, I confess I am confused. Whilst doing some 
catch-up reading for a political science class, I stumbled 
upon a work penned by the philosopher and activist Emma 
Goldman, in which she calls patriotism "a superstition — 
one far more injurious, brutal, and inhumane than religion. 
The superstition of religion originated in man's inability 
to explain natural phenomena ... patriotism, on the other 



hand, is a superstition artificially created and maintained 
through a network of lies and falsehoods; a superstition 
that robs man of his self-respect and dignity, and increases 
his arrogance and conceit." (Goldman, Anarchism and 
Other Essays 134). Which definition fits patriotism the 
best? 

By now, the reader likely believes that I am a paci- 
fist and against the impending war. Perhaps, perhaps 
not. Again, as I have said, I am unsure what the words 
"warfare" and "terrorism" mean, so until I resolve that 
question, I cannot make up my mind about the war about 
to occur. Maybe our government, our media, and our po- 
litical parties will eventually clarify that question for me. 
Perhaps, perhaps not. 

One thing seems clear, however. Whatever else we 
may say about the conflict about to take place, let us know 
what it is we are speaking of. Let us not gloss over the ac- 
tions of our troops with mealy-mouthed platitudes. Let us 
not grant warfare a more noble status than it truly deserves. 
Let us not ignore the fact that the largest "losers" in war 
are always the elderly, the infirm, women and children. 

Let us not forget that all the world is a stage, and the 
men and women in it actors, each playing a kind of theatri- 
cal part which may or may not correspond to reality. Let 
us not forget the cinematic aspects of war, and let us resist 
the temptation to see the villains as the ones in black hats. 
Let us not forget that on the battlefield, the wages of sin 
truly are death, Let us not forget that many wars before our 
time were fought for the most asinine of reasons, as will 
many wars in the future be fought for the most asinine of 
reasons. 

Will we remember these lessons, and continue to 
struggle with the definitions of "warfare" and "terrorism"? 
Perhaps, perhaps not. 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Echo, 

We are writing to correct misinformation reported in 
two recent Echo articles related to university diplomas. In 
spring 2000. a diploma committee was formed to recom- 
mend changes to the CLU diploma based on numerous 
concerns. Although most universities do not solicit student 
input in relation to formal university documents, we were 
interested in student feedback. The committee formed was 
representative of the entire CLU community. It was made 
up of CLU staff, including the director of publications 
(Class of '72), the director of university relations, mem- 
bers of the academic affairs department (including mem- 
bers of the Class of '95 & '00) and the registrar. It also 
included ADEP students, graduate students, traditional 
undergraduate students, and other alumni representatives. 
The committee consulted with various diploma manu- 
facturers and other universities and examined numerous 



sample diplomas. Based on thoughtful consideration, the 
current diploma was designed. Although financial impli- 
cations were considered, they were not the driving factor. 
From May 2000 to May 2002, we issued approxi- 
mately 1,400 new diplomas and received two formal 
complaints. Based on those and other complaints, we 
assembled an ad hoc committee including the director 
of publications, the registrar, academic affairs depart- 
ment representatives, alumni and representatives of the 
ADEP, graduate and undergraduate programs. This group 
reviewed the complaints and recommendations to see if 
there was anything that could be done to improve the qual- 
ity and presentation of the diplomas without substantively 
altering the decision made by the diploma committee in 
spring 2000. In response, the ad hoc committee approved 
the following recommendations: to move the seal to the 
center bottom of the diploma, to issue the diplomas in di- 
ploma covers to improve the overall presentation, to bold 
and enlarge the names of the diploma recipients and to 
increase the quality of the signatures. 



The following recommendations were considered 
but not approved: to emboss the CLU initials with gold 
— there are issues with this change based on symmetry 
as the words in our name are not equally balanced across 
the diploma, to use a thicker paper for printing — the pa- 
per used by CLU is an upgraded standard diploma paper 
recommended for use by diploma companies and other 
universities as one that works well for both printing and 
framing and to remove the shading behind the Califor- 
nia Lutheran University — the diploma is intended to be 
viewed from a distance. The shading gives the heading 
dimension and helps set it apart from the other text. 

The CLU diploma is a formal university document 
and is part of what unites alumni. While the university 
welcomes the input of students, the CLU diploma cannot 
be personalized or custom - designed by each class. 

The CLU Ad Hoc Diploma Committee 



Dear Echo, amount to have a piece of paper showing all the hard work and discipline I have put into 

these four years. I know that it just a meaningless piece of paper to some, but to me, it is 

I have been a student here for four years. I have invested over $80,000 and countless a part of my life that I'm very proud of. Please do something to increase the quality of our 

hours stressed out over homework, bent over my books trying to finish my degree. To diplomas, just like you want to increase the quality of the student's lives after college, 
realize that after all of this that the diploma is bulk - printed on cheap, thin paper makes 
me appalled. I wanted something to be proud of when I leave this school, not something I 

want to hide away on a comer of my apartment because it looks cheap. If this school has Luke Lundmark 

the vision to be the best liberal arts institution on the West Coast, what does a cheap di- Religion 

ploma prove? It proves that comers were cut just to save a buck. I will gladly pay an extra Class of 2003 



Have a great Spring Break! 



10 The Echo 



Sports 



March 19, 2003 



Kingsmen show Ithaca their power 
in late in ning rally to win, 14-2 



By Sean-Micheal Porter 
Staff Writer 



A devastating seven-run sixth inning 
led the Cal Lutheran baseball team to a 14- 
2 thumping of Ithaca College Wednesday, 
March 1 2, at North Field. 

The game was all knotted at 2-2 going 
into the sixth inning until CLU unloaded 




Photograph by Laura Kodgers 

Freshman Christian Hariot crosses the plate after 
his first collegiate home run. 



on Ithaca. The Kingsmen started it off with 
three straight hits; a single by senior Taylor 
Slimak, a double from senior Luke Stajcar 
and then a three-run home run by freshman 
Christian Hariot. It was the first home run 
of the season for Hariot and it couldn't 
have come at a better time. 

"I was pretty excited about that," said 
Hariot. "We got things going from there." 
The CLU offensive display 
wasn't finished. Back-to-back 
home runs by seniors Jason 
Claras and Brian Skaug crushed 
whatever hopes Ithaca had. 
Claras hit a two-run bomb that 
landed in Fillmore. 

"He just unloaded on that 
ball," said junior Jason Hirsh. 
"Everybody in the dugout 
dropped theirjaws." 

The home run was a spe- 
cial one for Claras because the 
pitcher who gave up the home 
run was a high school teammate 
of his. Skaug followed with a 
solo homer to left field and then 
Slimak drove in the last run of 
the inning with a single scoring 
junior Ed Edsall. 

The Kingsmen kept pour- 
ing it on, adding five more runs 
in the seventh inning. With the 
bases loaded, one run scored as a 
pitch hit senior Jeff Myers. Then 
with bases juiced, senior J.R. 
Cortez hit a grand slam to right 
field, officially making Ithaca's 
West Coast trip a sad one. 

"We put everything together 
today," said Claras. "We played 
outstanding defense and we hit 



Tennis dominates 



"Frenchie , 

By Victor Esquer 
Staff Writer 



continues to destroy opponents 



The men's tennis team defeated Mary 
Washington University in a hard-fought 
match, 4-3, at CLU on March 1 1 . 

The Kingsmen split the singles match- 
es 3-3 as Amir Marandy continued to dom- 
inate his opponents and was able to stay 
undefeated as he beat Conor Smith with 
ease 6-4, 6-3 in the No. 1 singles match. 

Marandy also won both of his matches 
against Emory and UC Santa Cruz last 
weekend. Quinn Calderon and Karlo 
Arapovic won their respective singles 



matches. Calderon pulled past Kevin 
Loden, 6-1, 6-4 and Arapovic defeated 
Tim Ryan, 6-4, 6-1. 

In the Kingsmen's doubles matches the 
solid duo of Marandy and Jeremy Quinlan 
got by Loden and Dan Uyar, 9-7, in the 
No. 1 doubles match. In the No. 2 doubles 
match, Arif Hasan and Quoc Ly defeated 
Paul Bristow and Smith, 8-3. The Kings- 
men won two of three doubles matches. 

"We're finding a way to win, and good 
things happen when you play hard," said 
Hasan. 

The win moved the Kingsmen to 7-3 
overall. 



Women smash Mary Hardin-Baylor, 8-1 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



The Regals tennis team improved to 6- 
2 after winning its only game last week. 

The team defeated the University of 
Mary Hardin-Baylor, 8-1, on March 14. 

Junior Rebecca Hunau, sophomore 
Lisa Novajosky and freshmen Blair Mur- 
phy, Jessica Thompson and Aimee Fiore 
all won their singles matches. 

Hunau and Novajosky came out on top 
in their doubles match, 8-2. Sophomore 
Jen Hansen and Murphy won their doubles 
match, 8-3, and freshman Amanda Howie 
and Thompson defeated their doubles op- 
ponents, 8-1. 

"They were fairly decent," Novajosky 



said. "Usually the out-of-state competition 
is pretty good. They had a different game 
style than the other teams we faced. A lot 
of them were pushers; they were hitting a 
slower ball and it was easier to play against 
them because they're so consistent. We just 
focused well enough to come out with the 
win ... It had been a week and a half since 
we last had a match. Everyone had worked 
hard during practice, and that helped us fo- 
cus on the match after not having one for 
so long." 

The March 1 5 match scheduled against 
Chapman was cancelled due to rain. 

The Regals competed against Skid- 
more College on Tuesday, March 18, but 
the results were not available at press 
time. 




1'holograph by Laura Kodgers 

Junior Jason Hirsh won his fourth game in as many attempts against Ithaca College 
on Wednesday. He struck out 11 in seven innings and allowed just two runs to remain 
undefeated this season. 



the ball well." 

Hirsh put on major league perfor- 
mance as he improved to a perfect 4-0 with 
the win. Hirsh went seven innings and had 
an impressive 1 1 K's. Freshman Wes Ste- 
venson came in to close out the game. 

"I had one of my better outings of the 
year," Hirsh said. 

Both Cortez and Hariot finished with 
four RBIs each. Hariot and Claras each 



had three hits as CLU tallied 17 hits in the 
game. 

Ithaca managed to get three hits and 
scored one run in the first inning and one 
more in the fourth. The Bombers made 
three errors in the field while the Kingsmen 
had none. With this victory CLU improved 
to 15-6 overall, while Ithaca fell to 2-2. 

The Kingsmen host Rutgers-Newark 
today at 2:30 p.m. 



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March 19. 2003 



Sports 



The Echo 11 



Track and Field at Cal Tech 
vs. La Verne & Cal Tech on March 8 



Recals 69, La Verne 127 
Regals 97.5, Cal Tech 101.5 

In the triple jump, freshman Denise 
French jumped for fourth place and a 
season best with 10.17m. 

Junior Jonea Boysen led the Regals 
into the top five in the javelin throw with 
her personal best of 27.85m. Boysen also 
lead the team in the discus, throwing for 
sixth place with 26.75. 

Sophomore Lauren Mooney got a 
season best as she and junior Dereem 
McKinney both leaped to 1.37m in the 
high jump. Teammate Leah Bingham was 
right behind with 1 .32. 

Bingham and Mooney also finished 
neck-to-neck in the 100m hurdles. Bing- 
ham finished just ahead in 17.38 seconds 
while Mooney finished in 17.41, another 
season best. 

Freshman Emma Holman placed 
fourth in the 3000m steeplechase in 12: 
49, just five seconds slower than her best 
time. She ran for a personal best in the 
5000m, finishing in 21:06.94, just in 
front of teammate Amanda Klever who 
finished in 21:17.39. 

Sophomore Carly Sandell finished 
fourth for a season best in a tight 1500m 
race in 5:22.44. Teammates Courtney 
Parks and Katy Svennungsen also ran for 
season bests, finishing sixth and seventh 
in 5:28.51 and 5:33.76, respectively. 

Svennungsen went on to run another 
season best in the 400m with 1:11.30, 
while Parks ran her second season best 
of the day in the 800m, finishing behind 
teammates Heather Worden and Lindsey 
Moore in 2:45.64. Worden ran in 2:29.07 
and Moore finished in 2:29.33 for third 
and fourth place. 

Sophomore Jacquie Ramirez and 
French finished third and fourth in the 
100m dash, Ramirez in 13.21 and French 
in 13.31 for a season best. 



French got her third season best of the 
day in the 200m, finishing fourth in 27.27. 
Ramirez was just two-tenths of a second 
away from her season best in the same 
race, finishing in 28.39. 

The women's 4x400m relay team ran 
for its best time of the season. Moore, 
Ramirez. Worden and Sandell finished the 
four-lap dash in 4:27.91. 



Kingsmen 56, La Verne 141 
Kingsmen 97, Cal Tech 97 
(the men beat Cal Tech because they 
had more first-place finishes than 
the Beavers) 

Freshman Adrian Cruz threw for his 
season best in the shot put, finishing fourth 
with a 12.10m toss. 

Senior Grant Kincade and sophomore 
Jon Siebrecht each leaped a season best in 
the triple jump. Kincade went 11.91m for 
fourth place and S iebrecht jumped 11.11m 
for sixth place. 

Junior Cory Hughes threw another 
personal best in the javelin, finishing fifth 
with a 45.99m throw. Junior Chris Hauser 
also PRed with 39.05m for eighth. 



Matt Brousard reached 3.05m in the 
pole vault, good for fifth place. Siebrecht 
had a season best with 2.59m for seventh 
place. 

Kincade placed third overall in the 
high jump, leaping 1.78m. Matt Brousard 
had a personal best with his fifth place 
jump of 1.57m. 

Kincade finished second in the 110m 
hurdles, but times from this race were not 
available due to a technical malfunction. 
However, he PRed in the 400m hurdles 
with 1:00.51, finishing third. 

In the 400m race. Matt Carlson and 
Derek Rogers each ran personal bests, 
Carlson ran 55.8 and Rogers, 57.56. 



Senior Tom Ham finished the 1500m 
and 5000m with his best times for the 
season after coming back from a stress 
fracture in his foot. 

Sophomore Marcus Green finished 
second in the 100m dash with a season 
best of 1 1.45. He ran another best in the 
200m, finishing in 23.23 for sixth place. 

In the 800m, freshman Grady Guy 
PRed with 2:06.8 for fourth place while 
sophomore Andy Miller was just one sec- 
ond off of his 2:20 PR. 

Guy ran another season best in the 
5000m, finishing in 17:52.73. 

The men's 4x100m relay team ran 
for it's best time of the season. Siebrect, 
Green, Rogers and Kincade ran around 
the track in 45.70 seconds. 




Photograph courtesy of Cory Hughes 
Freshman Heather Worden placed first 
for the Regals in the 800m against 
La Verne and Cal Tech. 



Holland 
leads golf 
team in 
tourney 

By Luke Patten 
Staff Writer 



The men's golf team finished fourth 
among eight NCAA Division III and 
NAIA teams, and eleventh out of 16 
teams overall in the Southern Califor- 
nia Intercollegiate Golf Championship 
hosted by UC San Diego last week. 

The tournament was a three-round 
event that took place at The Santaluz 
Club in Del Mar. The Kingsmen shot 
925 (308-311-306) for the tournament. 
Senior Matt Holland was the highest 
finisher for the Kingsmen, shooting 223 
(78-76-69), which was good for fifth 
place among the smaller schools. 

The other five scoring members of 
the Kingsmen team were junior Jordan 
Silvertrust, who shot a 227 (72-78-77, 
7th); freshman Austin Aker, who posted 
a 234 (75-85-74, T-19); freshman Peder 
Nyhus, who finished with a 237 (78-79- 
80, 23); freshman Adam Hollinger, who 
shot a 238 (80-78-80. T-24): and sopho- 
more Jason Poyser, who finished with a 
score of 244 (82-81-81, T-33). 

During the previous week, the 
Kingsmen split a pair of SCIAC matches 
by defeating Occidental (320-322) and 
suffering a one-stroke loss to Claremont 
(310-311) 

Against Occidental, it was Holland 
who again led the way for the Kingsmen 
by finishing with a 77 (37-40). In the 
matchup with Claremont, it was Silver- 
trust who was the low scorer. He shot a 
75 for the round. 

CLU's record for the season now 
stands at 2-3 overall and 2-2 in confer- 
ence play. That record is good enough 
for third place in the current standings. 
This week the team traveled to Georgia 
for the Huntingdon Invitational, but re- 
sults were not available at press time. 



this week's 

Kingsmen & 

Regals action 

Today, March 19 

-baseball v. Rutgers 
2:30 p.m. 

-softball at Sun West 
Tournament, Chapman 

Thursday, March 20 

-m tennis v. Whitman 
2p.m. 

Today, March 19 

-w tennis v. UCSC 
2 p.m. 

-baseball v. Chapman 
2:30 p.m. 



Softball undefeated this 
week, .50 on the season 



By John Botta 
Staff Writer 



CLU at Sun West Tournament 

The Cal Lutheran softball team de- 
feated Rhode Island College, 10-0, and 
St. Rose, 9-5, last Tuesday at the Sun West 
Classic in Orange. 

Against Rhode Island College, the Re- 
gals turned out one of their best offensive 
performances of the year. The team stuck 
Rhode Island for 12 hits, including two 
each from Heidi Miller, Chelsea Barrella 
and Emily Otineru. Otineru and Liz Taube 
each ran for triples. 

Gianna Regal picked up the win, pitch- 
ing four scoreless innings while surrender- 
ing just three hits. 

After blowing Rhode Island College 



off the map, the Regals found themselves 
down 3-1 in the sixth inning later in the 
day against the College of St. Rose. But 
Cal Lutheran came up with three big runs 
in the seventh and another five in the eighth 
to seal the win. 

Otineru had another solid game, pick- 
ing up two RBIs on a double and scoring 
another two herself. Erin Neuhaus went 
2-4, scoring two runs, while Olivia Chacon 
got the win as she pitched a complete 
game. 

CLU vs. La Verne 

The Cal Lutheran softball team de- 
feated SCIAC rival La Verne 5-1 in extra 
innings last Friday at La Verne. 

The Lady Leos held a 1 -0 lead until the 
seventh inning when Erin LaFata scored on 



an error to tie the game. 

The Regals went on to score four runs 
in the eighth to pull out the come-from-be- 
hind victory. 

Chacon got the win for the Regals 
to improve her record to 5-1. She has 
struck out 13 batters in eight appearances 
and leads the Regals pitchers with a 1 .29 
ERA. 

Cal Lutheran's record now stands at 7- 
3 in SCIAC play and 10-10 overall. 

Up Next 

Cal Lutheran's double-header against 
La Verne, scheduled for last Saturday, has 
been postponed due to rain. 

The Regals will be back in action 
today against Babson College in the Sun 
West Tournament, 



12 The Echo 



Sports 



March 19, 2003 



Where are you going for Spring 
Break? Support your Kingsmen & 
Regals a ll over So uthern California 



San Diego 

TRACK at Point Loma 
Saturday, March 22 

Orange County 

BASEBALL at Chapman 
Saturday, March 22 

2 P.M. 

W TENNIS at Vanguard 
Monday, March 24 

1 P.M. 

BASEBALL at Vanguard 
Thursday, March 27 

2 P.M. 

SOFTBALL at Chapman 
Sun West Tournament 
March 27, 28 & 29 




Sticking Around Thousand Oaks? 

M TENNIS VS. MlDDLEBURY 

Saturday, March 22 @ 2 p.m. 

GOLF at Kingsmen Invite, La Purisima Course 

Monday, March 24 and Tuesday, March 25 

W TENNIS vs. Pacific Lutheran 

Tuesday, March 25 @ 9 a.m. 

BASEBALL vs. North Central 

Wednesday, March 26 @ 2:30 p.m. 



Making a stop in San Diego Drop by 
Point Loma to see Amanda Klever and the 
rest of the track team race! 





Women s tennis powerhouse - Rebecca Hunau and Lisa Novajosky. See them and the 
rest of the Regals at home or travel south to see them against Vanguard on March 24. 



Senior Taylor Slimak has a. 41 5 on base percentage and 100 percent fielding accu- 
racy at the catcher i position. See him and the rest of the Kingsmen in Orange County 
against Chapman and Vanguard or at home over spring break! 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 



SOFTBALL STANDINGS 



SOFTBALL WAS CANCELED THIS WEEK DUE TO THE RAIN. THE NEXT 
GAMES WILL BE HELD SUNDAY, APRIL 6. 



Pink Bunny Rabbits 

Soiland 

Holy Hitters 

Tools 

Field Stompers 

Daryl Strawberry 

Fo Sho Fo Sho 

#1 Stunnaz 

BOGARDS 

Dirty South 
Weekend Warriors 
Hang Ten 
Hot Potatoes 
Big Purple Machine 
John Morse 
Dogs with Legs 
Your Grandpa's Daughter 
Coconut Crushers 
Utah Jamz 



2-0 (47) 
2-0 (41) 
2-0 (29) 
2-0 (25) 
2-0 (24) 
1-0 (20) 
1-0 (14) 
1-0 (18) 
1-0 (10) 
1-1 (12) 
0-1 (12) 
0-1 (10) 
0-1 (5) 
0-1 (3) 
0-1 (1) 
0-1 (0) 
0-2 (15) 
0-2 (10) 
0-2 (6) 



Basketball 
ALL-STARS 

Jason Angel 

Chris Hargrave 

Cam Robinson 

Derek Clarks 

Justin Barkhuff 

Mike Wethereimer 

Arsenio Valenzuela 

Tim Huck 

Andrew McGranahan 

Amie Fiore 

Nate Fall 

Alex Espinosa 



BASKETBALL STNIDIIIGS 



Diuimus Lucus 


1-0 


BuiRBLEBEES 


1-0 


Sloppy Secoiids 


1-0 


Best Coast All-Sthrz 


1-0 


High Rollers 


1-0 


Basketball Jimies 


1-0 


Black Parsers 


0-1 


Bollr moose 


0-1 


Chips 6 Salsa 


0-1 


Teflm TuF-Smn 


0-1 


Beaut Terri 


0-1 


Goodfellrs 


0-1 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 43, No. 20 


60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 


April 9, 2003 


Sports 


Features 


News 


Hirsh and baseball team set 
records against Oxy 


Three freshmen rescued by helicopter 
after getting lost on a hike. 


In-depth look at the Board 

of Regents and the 

future ofCLU. 


See story page 11 


See story page 4 


See story page 3 



Vikings invade CLU 



By Jessica Lauftnan 
Staff Writer 



Viking hats and 15th century costumes 
were popular forms of dress and ddcor at 
the 30th annual Scandinavian Festival. 

The event took place last weekend, 
April 5 and 6. in Kingsmen Park at Cali- 
fornia Lutheran University. The cost of 
admission for adults was $6 and $1 for 
children, and CLU students received free 
admission with an ID card. 

Activities highlighted the cultures of 
Scandinavian and Baltic countries. Main 
attractions included exhibits of historical 
Viking life, music, jewelry-making and 
crafts. 

The authentic Scandinavian food was 
a favorite among visitors; the cuisine fea- 
tured Swedish pancakes, meatballs, sau- 
sage dishes, pulse and many pastries. 

Sophomore Craig Herrera stopped 
by the festival to try something from the 
unique Scandinavian menu. 

"1 have never been to the festival be- 
fore; the Viking sandwich is really good. 
The music and food have been the most 
interesting," Herrera said. 




Photograph courtesy of Public Information 
A couple of Swedish royals display their intricate costumes during CLU's 30th annual 
Scandinavian Festival held last weekend in Kingsmen Park. 

CLU and the Scandinavian Ameri- Currently, the center can be found in a sec- 



can Cultural and Historical Foundation 
host the festival, which is held annually. 
SACHF was created to educate and unite 
the Scandinavian culture in the Southwest. 



tion of the Pearson Library. 

Gordon Lobritz is in charge of public 
relations for SACHF and has been attend- 
ing the festival for 30 years. He was at the 



festival this year to educate visitors about 
preserving Scandinavian heritage. Lobritz 
believes the CLU campus is ideal for their 
foundation because of the Scandinavian 
connection with the Lutheran religion. 

"Currently there are less than 300 
members, but we are growing rapidly," 
Lobritz said. 

Due to its increase in size, SACHF 
will be relocating to a larger location off 
campus in June 2003. It will reside in one 
of the university houses on Faculty Street. 

President Luedtke has attended the 
Scandinavian Festival for the past 10 
years. 

He noted that over time, academic 
and political issues have evolved into the 
festival activities. Forums and panels took 
place that discussed economic and political 
topics in relation to Scandinavian society. 

"This 'event was about establishing 
public relations and reputation rather than 
financial earnings," Luedtke said. "This 
festival brings tremendous publicity and 
involves a great community of people from 
all over who share Scandinavian relations 
with the university." 



Budget concerns in 
Senate after mishap 



Programs Board sets 
final plans for Formal 



By Brandee Tecson 
Staff Writer 



Several mischarges to the Senate bud- 
get causing an inadvertent deficit of funds 
were of primary importance at Monday 
night's Senate meeting. 

"As it rums out. Senate was charged 
over the summer and this fall for projects 
done by Facilities that were over the price 
authorized by Senate to spend," Senate Di- 
rector Kristin Smith said. 

ASCLU President Nicole Hackbarth 
asserts that the problem was nothing more 
than a misunderstanding. 

"There is not a deficit in the budget," 
Hackbarth said. "We actually have several 
thousand dollars. However, we are waiting 
for projects to be paid for and we may have 
over allocated." 

Not taking into account these projects, 
Senate continued to spend the money they 
believed they had. Recently, an ASCLU-G 
controller brought the problem to Smith's 
attention. 

"I had a meeting with the director of 
Facilities in which we discussed the prob- 
lem and agreed to rectify it by taking offall 
unauthorized charges," Smith said. 

Now, it is just a matter of matching 



"Senate was charged for 
projects done by 
Facilities that were over 
the price authorized by 
Senate to spend." 

Kristin Smith 
Senate Director 

the account numbers of the purchases and 
cross-listing them with the bills of last 
year's Senate. 

"It should be taken care of by the end 
of this week," Smith said. "But it did give 
[Senate] quite a scare." 

During this week's meeting, Senate 
also passed a bill to sponsor $2,000 to 
enhance the Zimmerman Music Building. 
Sophomore Jason Soyster sponsored the 
bill. 

Another bill that was passed granted 
$3,000 to Athletics, as a matching fund to 
the sports teams. Sophomore Kellie Ko- 
cher sponsored the bill. 

In addition, at the last Senate meeting 
before Spring Break, Senate voted to use 
the rest of their community-building bud- 
get to go for dessert. 



By Christa Hudson 
Staff Writer 



Programs Board met at T.G.I. 
Friday's in Thousand Oaks, Calif, for 
desert and community building time on 
Monday, March 31, 2003. There, they 
discussed issues surrounding Spring 
Formal and Spirit Day. 

Spring Formal final arrangements 
are in the making. "We have a photog- 
rapher from Life Touch, but we don't 
have prices yet. However, she is willing 
and wants to cater the packages to our 
needs," said Programs Board member 
Elissa Jordan. 

Spring Formal will be held at 
Disney's Paradise Pier Hotel at the Dis- 
neyland Resort. There will be a cocktail 
hour from 7 p.m. until 8 p.m. Dinner 
will be served at 8 p.m. and will last 
until approximately 9 p.m. 

From 9 p.m. until 1 a.m., a deejay 
will provide music for the event. Dinner 
will consist of salad, rolls, vegetables, 
rice and chicken, with cheesecake to 
follow for dessert. 

"There will be two cash bars avail- 



able and they will be checking ID and 
giving out wristbands," Jordan said. 
"Parking is normally $12; however, if 
you mention that you are from CLU, 
you will only have to pay $7. You must 
get it validated at the dance." 

The board also made plans for Spir- 
it Day, a day intended to allow students 
to free their minds and enjoy the CLU 
community. 

"We wanted something really dif- 
ferent, almost like an end of the year 
rally," coordinator Kristen Mathre said. 

"It will be held the Friday before 
finals from 11 a.m. until about I p.m. 
Lunch will be provided in the park, 
and we are looking into giving out care 
packages that would include pencils, 
scantrons and other needed items for 
finals," Mathre said. 

Jamba Juice will be there and will 
provide free Jamba Juice to the stu- 
dents. "The first 500 will get it free. 
There will be a choice of two or three 
flavored smoothies," Mathre said. 

Considerations for renting a dunk 
tank for the event have been discussed, 
board members said. 



Calendar 



2 The Echo 



April 9, 2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 




today 

april 9 

Encuenlros Week 

Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 



Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel 
9:11 p.m. 




The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 



%v 




thursday \^L4- 

april 10 Ti' 



CLV Career Expo 

Quad Near Flagpoles 
1 1 a.m. to 2 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 
Gym 

8 p.m. 



\ 1^ 



friday 

april 11 

Last Day to Withdraw from Classes 

Woodwind Ensemble Concert 

Chapel 
7 p.m. 

Club Lu: Easter Egg Hunt 

Gym 
9 p.m. 

Saturday J| 

april 12 

Admitted Students Day 

Spring Formal 

Disney's Paradise Pier, Anaheim 

7 p.m. 




Sunday 

april 13 

Palm Sunday 

Intramural Softball 

Gibello Softball Field 
8 a.m. 

Church 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 

Intramural Basketball 

Gym 

8 p.m. 

monday 

april 14 



ASCLV-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
5:15 p.m. 

A ccounling Association 
Peters 101 
6 p.m. 



ASCLV-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLV-G Rill Meeting 
Nygreen 2 

yogi 

tuesday £e 

april 15 



jbn^ tuesday (5j6 

mm "- 1 ' iff 

U ^^^^^" .Sitter Friends ^B 

Chapel Lounge ^^^B 

5:15 p.m. W ^^ 




Asian Club and Friends 

Pederson Lounge 
6 p.m. 



Bible Study 

Chapel Lounge 
8 p.m. 

Way of the Cross 

Chapel 
8 p.m. 




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What in the world is a Presidential Host? 

Hosts are the dedicated CLU students who lead campus tours and have: 
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Sophomore, Junior or Senior status for the upcoming year Good public relations skills Deep love for CLU! 

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April 9, 2003 



News 



The Echo 3 



M ^ — — — . I HI I- 1 HO 

Regents plan CLU future 



By Heather Ladwig 
Staff Writer 



The Board of Regents plays a crucial 
role and carries great responsibilities con- 
cerning the future of California Lutheran 
University. Students can find this board of 
34 members on campus only three times a 
year. 

"In simple terms, the Board of Regents 
can be looked at as the checks and balances 
of our school; they oversee the major de- 
cisions our school makes," senior Sally 
Sagen said. 

The Board of Regents is the govern- 
ing body for the university. Twenty-seven 
of the members are elected for three-year 
terms. Although the board only meets on 
campus three times a year, the meetings are 
extremely lengthy and structured, allowing 
the board to always keep the vision and 
mission of the university in mind. 

"The Board is one of the most strategic 
assets of any university," said provost and 
Dean to the Faculty Pam Jolicoeur. 

Board members are only allowed to 
serve their terms for three consecutive 
years. This allows the board to maintain 



diversity and allow prospective regents to 
be elected. 

Board members are elected by a 100- 
person convocation. The convocation is 
made up of members of the five Synods 
of Region 2 of the Evangelical Lutheran 
Church in America, faculty, the university 
president and members-at-large. 

The responsibilities of the Board of 
Regents include electing university presi- 
dent, appointing the chief administrating 
officers and faculty, planning university 
campaigns, approving the annual budget, 
authorizing tuition and fees for the fol- 
lowing academic year, approving salaries 
for teachers and many other important 
decisions that directly affect the campus 
administrators, students and well being of 
the university. 

There is a good ratio of men to women 
on the Board of Regents. 

"The chair of the board is a woman, 
the previous chair of the board was a 
woman and the chair of the trusteeship and 
the academic affairs committees are both 
women," President Luther Luedtke said. 

In a letter dated March 3, 2003, 
President Luedtke wrote to the faculty, 



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"The Board of Regents 
can be looked at as the 
checks and balances of 
our school, they oversee 
the major decisions." 

Sally Sagen 
Senior 

administration and staff of CLU that, "We 
are fortunate to have a governing board 
of seasoned, caring and professionally 
successful people who are energetically 
committed to the mission of CLU, to our 
students, faculty and staff, and to building 
a truly distinguished university here." 

The regents come from various parts 
of the United States, such as Maryland, 
Illinois and Oklahoma, and different parts 
of the world like Japan, for the board meet- 
ings. 

ASCLU President Nicole Hackbarth 
arranged a summit meeting with the Board 
of Regents this semester to discuss some of 
the students' main concerns. Summit meet- 
ings allow ASCLU members to act as rep- 



resentatives of the entire student body and 
become well informed on issues of CLU. 

"It was extremely beneficial for both 
parties and I know that the regents who 
attended really enjoyed talking with stu- 
dents," Hackbarth said. 

During the Feb. 21-22 Board of Re- 
gents meeting, crucial decisions and ap- 
provals were made. Six faculty members 
were promoted to the rank of associate 
or full professor, a new degree in bioen- 
gineering and computer science was ap- 
proved, two more private residences for 
use as student housing were authorized for 
purchase and many other important things 
like tuition and room and board fees were 
discussed. 

The next Board of Regents meeting 
will be held May 30 and 3 1 at CLU. A de- 
cision to focus the next five to six meetings 
on a single major goal or administrative 
area was made at the Feb. 20-2 1 meetings 
last semester. 

The Board of Regents hopes this strat- 
egy will assist the university in leading 
another successful campaign to follow the 
current North campus campaign, "Now is 
the Time." 



No cases of SARS at 
CLU, Rosser reports 



By Brett Rowland 
News Editor 



Dean of Students Bill Rosser ad- 
dressed concerns about the Severe Acute 
Respiratory Syndrome in an e-mail sent 
to California Lutheran University students 
and faculty last week. 

"In the last two days, there has been 
some misinformation concerning a CLU 
student who recently traveled to Asia. The 
student has been carefully evaluated by 
medical personnel and does not exhibit 
the signs for SARS," Rosser said in the 
e-mail. 

The SARS virus has sickened more 
than 2,000 people worldwide, the Associ- 
ated Press reported last week. The AP also 
said that new cases are being reported daily 



in Hong Kong, despite strict quarantine 
measures. 

According to an April 5 press release 
from the World Health Organization, 15 
new cases of the SARS virus have been 
reported in the United States. Symptoms 
of the virus include high fever, aches, dry 
cough and shortness of breath. The cause 
and cure for the mysterious illness is still 
unknown. 

"Currently the university is unaware of 
any concerns related to SARS among the 
CLU faculty, staff and students," Rosser 
said. 

AP reports that two of the latest possi- 
ble incidents of SARS in the United States 
include two people from Orange County 
and two from Santa Clara County. 

Students concerned about SARS 
should contact Health Services (x3225). 



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4 The Echo 



Features 



April 9, 2003 



CLU freshmen rescued by air 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff writer 



A hike to Zuma Beach on March 8 at 2 
p.m. turned into a rescue mission from the 
Santa Monica Mountains for freshmen Toni 
Burnett, Kelsie Gatke and Erica Dahl. 

"It was the first time all of us had hiked 
in the Santa Monica Mountains," Burnett 
said. "We just saw it one day when we were 
driving to the beach. We thought it would 
be fun to go there, but we never made it. 
It's called Devil's Backbone Trail. We tried 
to get a map when we got there. But all the 
maps were gone." 

"We were going to go hiking and then 
go to the beach," Burnett said. "We stopped, 
we had lunch and we started to hike. We 
wandered off the path and we found the 
river. We saw a waterfall before that and we 
were like, 'Oh, there must be water," so we 
followed that and that's how we found the 
river. Then we figured if we went up river, 
we'd find the waterfall, so we went up river 
and we found the waterfall." 

"It was real pretty," Burnett said. "We 
played in it; we swam and we [took ] pic- 
tures. It was really fun and then we figured 
we would just follow the river for a little 
while, then we'd get off the river, we'd get 
back on the trail and then we'd go back 
home. We went down the river for a long 
way, past the trail we came from and then 
we got on what we thought was the [right] 
trail, but it wasn't. First, we thought the 
trail was parallel to the river, so we started 
climbing up. Then we hiked more. We got 
higher and we got higher." 

According to Gatke, the three realized 
they were lost after hiking 15 minutes on 



what they thought was the right trail. They 
figured out where they were and followed 
the trail since it was parallel to the water. 

"It was 3:30 and we thought that, we 
should probably get home before it got 
dark,'" Gatke said. 

"We found what looked like a trail and 
we started going up that. We were crawling 
under bushes, over bushes and rock climb- 
ing." 

"It wasn't going anywhere," Burnett 
said. 

According to Gatke and Burnett, the 
three called for help at 5 p.m. 

"We finally got frustrated because I 
was not having fun at that point. We first 
tried to call 41 1 to get the ranger station so 
we wouldn't have to call 911. Apparently, 
41 1 does not have a listing for the ranger 
station or any sort of emergency assis- 
tance," Burnett said. 

"They said there was no such thing as a 
park ranger in the Santa Monica Mountains 
or for Malibu," Gatke said. 

"It was getting dark so we called 911. 
The sheriff talked to me for a long time," 
Burnett said. "He sent out three search 
parties. [He] said, 'I know exactly where 
you guys are. We're going to be there so 
fast. You girls just hang in there another 15 
minutes.' I thought, 'Do you really know 
where we are?'" 

According to Gatke, the rescuers ar- 
rived at 8:45 p.m. Dahl said that exchang- 
ing shouts with the party helped the rescu- 
ers to find them. 

"When the people came," Burnett 
said, "we asked if they knew where we 
were. They said, 'No. We thought you 
were at the next mountain over. We were 
just passing through.' The first thing the 



sheriff said was, 'Did anyone order a 
Domino's pizza?'" 

According to Dahl, the rescuers gave 
her, Gatke and Burnett jackets, and could 
not decide how to get everyone out of the 
mountains. 

"They said we didn't have the proper 
clothes on, because we were wearing 
shorts and tank tops," Dahl said. 

Dahl said that the rescuers chose to 
use a helicopter. Burnett said she bruised 
her left bicep after hitting one of the 
helicopter's tires. 

"We'd been hiking forever," Dahl 
said. "The rescue team thought that they 
could send in another team and use chain 
saws and chop a path. Then they decided, 
'That won't work because that'll take 
forever. They'd still have to find where 
we are, chop it all down and then hike 
back.'" 

"Their boss did not want to get the he- 
licopter," Dahl said. "Then the sheriff said, 
'Those girls are close to hypothermia and 
they're scraped up from head to toe.'" 

"At about 10:30 p.m., they finally 
came back with the helicopter. They 
hooked me on the harness first with one 
of the sheriffs. Then Kelsie went next with 
the park ranger. She hit her head on the 
side of the helicopter on the way up. Then 
Toni, who was going with the professional 
who does this every day, started swinging. 
They flew underneath the helicopter, hit 
the other side and she [Bruneft] hit the 
tire. She was freaking out. They finally got 
into the helicopter," Dahl said. 

According to Dahl the rescuers closed 
Kanan Road so the helicopter could land. 
The rescuers took her, Burnett and Gatke 
to ambulances before releasing them. 



"There were ambulances, fire trucks, 
search and rescue cars and patrol people," 
Dahl said. "Probably some newspeople 
were there, too. They checked our vital 
signs to see if we needed an ambulance. 
We decided that we were okay. They just 
asked us questions like our personal infor- 
mation to document it [and said] that we 
could sit there until [we were] comfortable 
enough to get out of the car and actually 
go home." 

"They also said that we would most 
likely have poison oak. But none of us did. 
I wasn't too shaken up at that time. They 
(Gatke and Burnett] were a little more 
shaken up than I. We just sat there for a 
while. Once they were done questioning 
us, we just got in the car and came. back 
home," Dahl said. 

Gatke said the weather was hot dur- 
ing the day, but it was 45 degrees when 
the sun set. 

"We checked how cold it was when 
we got back," Gatke said. "We were shiv- 
ering." 

Burnett and Gatke said they learned 
from the experience. 

"Don't wander off the trail," Burnett 
said. 

"If you're stuck and you're going to 
be stuck, go into where the bushes are so 
that the wind won't get you," Gatke said. 
"You'll stay warmer." 

Burnett, Gatke and Dahl said they 
never returned to the Santa Monica Moun- 
tains after the rescue. 

"My mom bought me a hiking kit 
when I got home," Gatke said. "There was 
this box wrapped up with all sorts of stuff. 
But the airport took my flares and my wa- 
terproof matches when 1 got back." 



Semester in Washington D.C. 



By Megan Corley 

SPECIAL TO THE ECHO 



Have you ever imagined working 
at the White House, on Capitol Hill, or 
at CNN in Washington D.C? CLU is a 
member of a program called the Lutheran 
College Washington Semester that gives 
you that chance. 

The LCWS it is a 14-week program 
so it's just slightly shorter than a semester 
at CLU. 

Students intern four full days a week, 
and the internship is worth eight credits. 
Students are also required to take two 
classes in addition to their internship. 
There are about six different classes to 
choose from and each class meets once a 



week. In addition to classes and a nearly 
full-time internship, students attend week- 
ly field trips throughout the D.C. area. 

Only students attending LCWS's 13 
member colleges and universities may 
participate in the program. The program 
is open to students of all majors. In fact, 
students majoring in everything from 
biology to communications have partici- 
pated in the program. 

There are five CLU students in D.C. 
this semester, Saul Aguilar III, Nikki Aug, 
Rob Boland, ICrissy Elsmore and myself. 

"I joined the LCWS program because 
I wanted a chance to intern and live in 
D.C. and meet new people," junior Aug 
said. 

"Washington D.C. is a city rich in cul- 



ture, history and architecture, definitely 
the Disneyland for adults," Aguilar said. 

LCWS was founded in 1986 by 
Muhlenberg, Gettysburg and Roanoke col- 
leges. Eventually, CLU, along with nine 
other Lutheran colleges and universities 
around the country, joined the program. 

Students interested in LCWS should 
contact political science professor and 
LCWS faculty representative Dr. Herbert 
Gooch. CLU can only send 10 students 
during the fall and spring semesters com- 
bined, so space is limited. 

Students interested must complete an 
application packet. The packet consists 
of an application, including a short essay 
explaining why they would want to spend 
a semester in D.C. and where they would 



like to intern, a resume, writing samples, a 
letter of recommendation, an official tran- 
script and a deposit. Most students who 
are accepted into the program have at least 
a3.0GPA 

Students live in apartments in Arling- 
ton, Virginia just across the street from 
the Arlington Cemetery and the Iwo Jima 
Memorial with two or three other students 
from the other member colleges and uni- 
versities. There are no RAs or cafeteria 
food, so students live independently. This 
in itself is a learning experience for most 
students. 

To learn more about LCWS check 
out the website at www.washingtonese 
mester.org, or contact Megan Corley at 
peppnsaIt@aol.com. 



Brown Bag series: "The Poet Within 



n 



By Leah Sanchez 

STAFF WRITER 



The Women's Poetry Network came to 
share several pieces at the Brown Bag Lec- 
ture series on April 1, 2003. The Women's 
Poetry Network, which read several poems, 
old and new, happy and sad, offered the au- 
dience tips on how to get started writing for 
themselves and find the "Poet Within." 

The Women's Poetry Network, which 
consists of Dr. Carol Kivo, Ellen Reich and 
Florence Weinberger, has been meeting to- 
gether for the past five years, sharing poetry 
with one another. The women lived in the 
same area and found that they shared a com- 
mon interest. 

"We are a group of women who critique 
each other on a constructive level," Kivo 
said. 



Kivo and Dr. Kateri Alexander, direc- 
tor of the Women's Resource Center, went 
to graduate school together. Dr. Alexander 
was the person who named the network and 
invited people to share their poetry. 

"It is wonderful to share yet another day 
with (Kivo)," Alexander said. 

The lecture began with Kivo talking to 
the audience about how to find the "Poet 
Within." She explained that poetry comes 
from anywhere, from family and friends to 
thoughts and feelings. 

"It is wonderful to be able to turn these 
sources into words that can connect with 
someone else," Kivo said. 

Each woman shared a handful of their 
poems with the audience with topics span- 
ning from family to whales to death. The 
audience's reactions changed accordingly 
from outbursts of laughter to somber si- 
lence. Reich, whose first book is coming out 



soon, read two brand-new poems with a bit 
of apprehension. 

"There is always an element of risk in 
reading new work," Reich said. 

Weinberger read some compelling po- 
ems that she wrote about the death of her 
husband who had been a smoker. She ex- 
plained to the audience that she had written 
most of these poems late at night when she 
could not sleep after her husband died. Wein- 
berger has written books entitled "Breathing 
Like a Jew" and "Carnal Fragrance." She 
also has a book coming out shortly. 

Kivo explained that she has been ex- 
perimenting with her writing lately and read 
one of her poems entitled "Love Letters," 
which was about different types of letters 
that she has received over the years. The 
poem was short, but brought many smiles 
to the audience. 

For those people who are interested in 



starting to write poetry of their own Kivo 
says that it is important to write a lot, find 
a share group to join and read other poets, 
old and new. 

"We feed off other writer's work," Kivo 
said. 

Kivo also explained that poets need to 
have discipline to succeed. 

She stated that she sometimes sits for 
hours before she writes one or two poems 
that she feels may have potential. One of 
the most important things to keep in mind is 
that an idea for a poem can come at any time 
and one needs to always have that way of 
thinking to become a poet. All of the women 
agreed that there are limitless benefits in 
writing poetry. 

"It is so wonderful to be able to connect 
and to have changed, grown and experi- 
enced something bigger, a world bigger than 
yourself," Kivo said. 



April 9, 2003 



Features 



The Echo 5 



Campus Quotes 



How did you spend your break? 




^>t^ 




i 




Alicia Jordan, drama major, class of 2006 Greg Semerdjian, communication major, Josh Murray, sociology major, class of 2003 Chris Mazza, biology major, class of 2004 

class of 2004 

"1 went on choir tour, bonded with all my "Drove to Reno, got a speeding ticket, "I played with the captain and fed some 

choir family and had a great time learning "I worked in indentured servitude in the nun g out for three days, came home and ducks." 

what fiin in Vegas is all about." mail center." worked for Facilities." 





**.-"-- 



Jon Siebrecht, multimedia major, class of 
2005 

"I went to the Promenade and watched 
some tapdancers, some Asian cup jugglers 
and some Hispanic guitarists." 



Yessica Diaz, liberal studies major, class 
of 2004 

"I went to Puerto Rico and enjoyed the 
salsa festival." 



Gretchen Handloser, English major, class 
of 2004 

"I went home and spent a lot of quality 
time with my family and saw some friends 
whom I haven't seen in a while." 



Jaymie Nagasawa, multimedia/computer 
science major, class of 2006 

"I went to North Carolina to relax and to 
visit a friend. Then I went to the Grand 
Canyon and saw snow for the first time." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jon Gonzales 



puzz135 



1 


2 


' 


1 


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i 


8 


7 


" 


1 


* 


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" 


12 






' 










" 






16 






11 




■ 17 




11 








vfil 1 ' 








20 I ■}! 








22 


23 




■" 




» ■ H M 




27 


2* 


2* 

34 

40 




■ 


P 




» 




- 


■ 


» 


■ 

49 


" 




tt 




51 


*m 


" 








H 


56 








9T I ^m H 








14 


60 


•1 






1 


K 




63 






1 


" 






M 






■ 










' 







ACROSS 


50 Hole in skin 


20 Decompose 


1 Cereal grain 


51 Altercation 


22 Plant with compounded leaves 


4 Pretend 


53 Once more 


23 Bestow upon 


9 Portion ot body 


55 Dwarfed trees 


25 No longer is 


1 2 Town in Oklahoma 


56 Confer holy orders upon 


27 Slang for OK 


13 Crinkled fabric (var. spelling) 


61 Form of be 


28 Annoy persistently 


14 Had dinner 


62 Rain 


30 Witty remark 


15 Comfort in sorrow 


64 Fork prong (Scot.) 


32 Male sheep 


17 Sunday Christian festival 


65 Rocks on mountain top 


36 The extreme end 


19 Go in 


66 Theme 


38 Having moderate heat 


21 Came upon 


67 Direction (abbr ) 


41 Depressant 


22 Conveyed 




43 7th Greek letter 


24 No relative height 


DOWN 


45 Give 


26 Saucy 


1 Organization of American States (abbr ) 


47 Vegas 


29 Study of insects (abbr.) 


2 Fuss 


49 Greek marketplace 


31 Road substance 


3Art * 


52 Tear down 


33 Fish eggs 


4 Accountant (abbr ) 


54 One of armed services 


34 Midwestern state (abbr.) 


5 Wicker basket 


55 Used to hit ball 


35 Negative word 


6 Tantalum symbol (abbr.) 


56 Indicates mountain 


37 Had a seat 


7 Open (poetic) 


57 Belonging to a thing 


39 Southern state (abbr ) 


8 500 sheets of paper 


59 007"s creator 


40 Droop head 


9 Mad 


60 Bom 


42 Even 


10 Inhabitant (suf ) 


63 Bone 


44 Natives of ancient Media 


11 Each 




46 Absent without leave (abbr.) 


16 Susan 




48 Parents education group 


18 Month (unoffcal abbr ) 





6 The Echo 



Arts 



April 9, 2003 



CLU Choir spends Spring Break 
on tour of the Southwestern states 



By Cameron Brown 
Staff writer 



With the exception of last year, the 
CLU Choir has toured the Southwestern 
states as part of the program's yearly 
agenda for the past 10 years. Each year, 
the choir tackles new pieces of music that 
challenge both the intellectual and physi- 
cal skills of the group. 

The CLU Choir first stopped at the 
Eden Lutheran Church in Riverside, Ca- 
lif. Following were two more stops: Our 
Saviors First Lutheran Church and Tanque 
Verde Lutheran Church, both in Tucson, 
Ariz. Soon after, the choir sang two more 
times in Arizona, once in Phoenix and then 



in Sun City. 

For two days, the choir stayed in Las 
Vegas where they expressed their vocal 
talent at the Community Lutheran Church. 
In conclusion to the tour, the choir came 
back to California and went to the Incarna- 
tion Lutheran Church and the Red Hill Lu- 
theran Church. To say the least, this choir 
had a busy schedule. 

In some instances, like in Phoenix 
and Las Vegas, receptions were held after 
the performance, enabling prospective 
students, as well as others, a chance to 
interact with the choir members and get a 
general idea of the choirs' preparation for 
the tour. 

'The tour was a blast and we did pretty 
well, in my opinion," said Matt White, 



freshman and member of the choir. "I es- 
pecially enjoyed the reception because it 
gave the choir an opportunity to talk with 
the people who watched us perform." 

Leading the choir in all its endeavors 
and accomplishments is associate profes- 
sor of music and director of choral art at 
CLU, Dr. Wyant Morton. 

Morton received his undergraduate 
degree from Gonzaga University in Spo- 
kane, Wash., and later earned his master's 
and doctorate degrees from the University 
of Arizona in Tucson. Since 1992, Morton 
has been a part of the CLU staff and has 
earned great respect from his students, ac- 
cording to White. 

"As the choir went on the trip, I knew 
that they were going to do well," Morton 



said. "Little did I know, though, that they 
would exceed any and all expectations that 
I had going into the tour." Morton said that 
this specific group of students has excelled 
beyond his previous students. 

"All of my students have been spe- 
cial and unique," Morton said, "but this 
particular group is amazing and has done 
wonders with the material that they have 
been given." 

The tour did not go to any competi- 
tions or contests, but rather to gain expe- 
rience that often comes with such a large 
event. 

"The choir has come a long way, and 
I am looking ahead to all the future events 
and places that we get to go," Morton 
said. 



Drama department prepares for "Company" 



By Cameron Brown 
Staff writer 



All across America, television view- 
ers are enthralled with NBC's sitcom 
"Friends." Perhaps it's the ridiculous 
humor that strikes its viewers, or maybe 
it's the hilarious characters whose lives 
are a merry-go-round of pointless events 
that make this show so successful and 
entertaining. 

With this in mind, Professor Ken 
Gardner of California Lutheran Universi- 
ty's drama department thought that adapt- 
ing a similar storyline for a play would be 
a good idea. 

Gardner decided to choose the criti- 
cally acclaimed, six-time Tony award 



winning musical, "Company," by Stephen 
Sondeim. 

"The play is very much like the tele- 
vision show 'Friends,' but with music," 
Garner said. "It won the Tony for best 
musical and is respected by most Broad- 
way composers." 

The musical takes place in modem 
day New York City and focuses on the 
main character, Robert, played by fresh- 
man Michael Falcone. Robert is a 35- 
year-old bachelor contemplating the pros 
and cons of marriage. A majority of his 
friends have been married for quite some 
time. For one reason or another, though, 
Robert has decided to avoid the whole 
marriage scene. 

According to Gardner, Robert's 



friends have been encouraging him to get 
married, but he seems to be enjoying the 
single life. 

To some extent, Robert views his 
friends as being hypocritical because all 
of them have marriages that are filled 
with chaos and disaster. This observation 
enforces Robert's opinion that marriage is 
for the lonely; or those in need of com- 
panionship. 

However, after some deep thought 
and emotional searching, Robert sees the 
light at the end of the tunnel. Neverthe- 
less, this doesn't mean that he selects mar- 
riage as his ideal. The only way to find out 
Robert's final decision is to view the play 
first hand. 

Since this is a musical, it requires 



a lot of time for both rehearsals and set 
construction. 

"Auditions started back in December 
and practices began in February," Gard- 
ner said. "The cast practices three to four 
hours per day, and since spring break, the 
cast has been practicing five days a week 
for that amount of time." 

Gardner said that even though the 
practices are very time consuming, the 
construction of the set is just as tedious. 

"Company" will be performed at the 
Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza on April 
25, 26, 27 and May 2, 3 and May 4. 

Tickets for the play are available in 
Student Union Building for $10 with a 
valid CLU ID. To learn more about the 
play, call (805) 493-3415. 



CD Review 



CD Review: Malkmus' "Pig Lib" 



By Trevor Kelley 
Staff writer 



You can blame Stephen Malkmus for a 
lot of things. Everything from the invention 
of indie rock to the sustenance of Weezer's 
"career" has been placed solely on Malk- 
mus' shoulders. But that's not to say that 
you should feel sorry for the guy. 

After all, he is a survivor. As leader 
of indie rock darlings Pavement, Malkmus 
stampeded his way through the alternative 
nation in the '90s, coming out the other end 
of the decade as one of the genre's most 
fortunate sons. When he decided to ditch 
Pavement and go solo in early 2001, his 
self-titled, free-to-be-me debut was a smash 
hit. But there was also a deep irony to the 
record. While doing interviews for "Stephen 
Malkmus," the 36 year-old singer often stat- 
ed that he was trying to escape his college 
rock past, which seemed odd, considering 
he was doing this by writing songs about 



both college and rock. 

Stephen Malkmus' centerpiece was a 
tune called "Jenny & The Ess-Dogg," which 
chronicled the rise and fall of a relationship 
between two new-school hippies. It con- 
tained lyrics that could be both touchingly 
sad and deliberately loaded, ending with a 
break up and a summary. "Jenny pledged 
Kappa and she started pre-law," Malkmus 
sang, "and off came those awful toe rings." 

Sometimes, when Malkmus sang 
"Jenny & The Ess-Dogg" he was kidding. 
Other times he was just kidding himself. 
But when he screamed near the song's cli- 
max, "You got to let me out of here," it was 
no joke. Malkmus, for once, sounded like 
he meant it. 

Which is fair. When you've been 
around as long as Malkmus has, you've 
earned the right to outrun your past. And 
that exactly what he does with "Pig Lib," 
his long-awaited second solo album with 
his new backing band the Jicks. Filled with 



deep, rich songwriting and Grateful Dead- 
style jamming, "Pig Lib" is an exercise in 
melodious marathons that eventually kick 
dust at Malkmus' past. When he sings, 
"You don't know me, because you won't 
change" (as he does on the divine "Animal 
Midnight"), he sounds like he's achieved a 
small personal victory. 

Elsewhere, Malkmus strives to be the 
last one standing at the parking lot after- 
party, soloing for nearly nine minutes on the 
pro-rock epic "1% of One" and daydream 
believing on the easygoing "Do Not Feed 
The Oyster." Even down-tempo tunes like 
"Us" chug along like a great Dead jam, 
allowing the listener to exhale as a sea of 
guitars lazily float by. As for the rest of "Pig 
Lib," it's all Malkmus-style "American 
Beauty" gorgeous granola-guitar rock and 
blue-sky balladry. And, hey dude, I bet even 
Jerry would be proud. After all, on "Pig 
Lib," Malkmus has never sounded more 
grateful to be alive. 



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7 The Echo 



Opinion 



April 9, 2003 



CZ5 

o 



£ 



O 



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May 14, 2003 



Protesters add to problem 




By Michele Hatler 
Editor in chief 



America was shocked by the dev- 
astating events of September 11, 2001. 
The result: America became united again. 
Patriotism and nationalism lost during the 
Vietnam War was restored. Unfortunately, 
because of the current war with Iraq, our 
country is again no longer united. 

The country has been divided into war 



supporters and anti-war protesters. Now, in 
a time when our country really needs to be 
united, how are these sign-slinging protest- 
ers helping? 

On the morning of April 7, 2003 in 
Oakland, Calif, there was an anti-war 
protest that was resolved by police firing 
rubber bullets. The protesters engaged 
in acts of civil disobedience, preventing 
smooth operation at a harbor. As a result, 
several longshoremen attempting to get to 
work were hit by the rubber bullets fired 
by police officers. The shots were meant 
for the obnoxious protesters, but decent, 
hard-working Americans were caught in 
the crossfire. This is just one of the many 
examples of violence that has resulted 
from recent anti-war protests. 

Instead of breaking the law, causing 
traffic jams or disrupting the work of fel- 
low citizens, protesters should find other 
ways to get the gaudy headlines they lust 



for. By breaking the law, protesters further 
alienate their countryman. These protesters 
are holes in the strong blanket of patriotism 
that helped our nation to unite after the 
tragic terrorist attacks of September 1 1 . 

Despite protesters lofty claims to seek 
peace, they have only brought chaos and 
violence to our nation during this decid- 
edly difficult time. Children are being ex- 
ploited by standing on comers protesting 
a war they know nothing about. Soldiers 
are fighting and dying on foreign soil to 
preserve the very rights which protesters 
abuse daily here at home. 

Instead of protesting a war that has 
already commenced, find something more 
productive to do than paint signs. America 
needs to be unified to be strong. Inner con- 
flicts weaken us. You don't have to agree 
with war, but adding to the violence and 
controversy is counterproductive. 



Staff Editorials 



Liquid assets: U.S. and Iraq 



By Adam Martin 
Columnist 



Sun Tzu, in his classic "The Art of 
War," has written that all warfare is based 
upon deception. While I don't believe this 
is entirely true, in our day we might modify 
his statement to say that war is seldom 
waged for only one reason, and it is sel- 
dom waged only in one manner. War is the 
ultimate decision of nation-states to stop 
speaking to one another in a civilized man- 
ner, instead, choosing to resort to methods 
of legitimized violence — but sometimes 
there are important reasons for this to hap- 
pen; some noble, some less noble and some 
simply strategic. 

So why are we at war in Iraq, right 
now? Two words: liquid assets. Liquid as- 
sets are extremely important to this nation 
in a variety of ways. 

Liquid asset number one: blood. The 
blood of thousands of Americans and Iraq- 
is — both in the events leading up to and 
during the first Persian Gulf War and in the 
current war. This includes some civilian 
blood and some military blood. The civil- 
ian blood shed for no good reason by Sad- 
dam Hussein, the blood of his own people 



shed over fifteen years ago. Why did we 
wait to avenge these civilian deaths? Why 
did we not call Saddam Hussein to task 
sooner for the murder of his countrymen? 
The military blood — the lives of American 
troops as they repelled Iraqi forces from 
Kuwait, only to find themselves stopped 
at the border, wondering why they could 
not pursue their prey to its lair and finish 
the hunt. Why did we not let them continue 
all the way to Baghdad in 1 99 1 ? The blood 
of Iraqi civilians — lost due to malnourish- 
ment, disease and insufficient medical care 
due to a decade of embargoes. What quar- 
rel did the United States have with them, 
and how would such punitive actions have 
truly removed Saddam Hussein? The blood 
of civilians of all nations, potentially shed 
by weapons of mass destruction, which we 
allege Saddam Hussein possesses. Who is 
he truly harboring and exactly what weap- 
ons does he have? There are many ques- 
tions and few definite answers as of yet. 

Liquid asset number two: petroleum. 
No, not only because we have an admin- 
istration friendly to the oil industry. Oil 
would be a concern for our nation whether 
or not George W. Bush was our president. 
We are at least 62 percent dependent 
upon foreign sources of liquid fuels for 



our energy needs, Some have said this is 
because we Americans drive cars that are 
not fuel-efficient enough. While this is 
true, even without sport utility vehicles, 
this nation's appetite — dire need— for oil 
would not decrease. We do not only de- 
pend upon oil for transportation but for 
electricity generation — natural gas, solar 
power, wind power and nuclear power 
still only cover a relatively small portion 
of our energy market. Advances in renew- 
able fuels are making progress but appar- 
ently not quickly enough to meet our rising 
demands. Nuclear fission power remains a 
power source Americans wish to keep at 
arm's length. Nuclear fusion has not yet 
been made feasible despite many close at- 
tempts and noteworthy experiments. One 
might think that as we become more of 
a consumer society we wouldn't need as 
much electricity, computers and informa- 
tion technology. This includes our vaunted 
Internet, and the demand for computers 
and access to the Internet is not declining, 
in this nation or abroad. Finally, our navy 
and air force — the keys to our military 
supremacy over the globe. Without plenti- 
ful and secure sources of fuel, this nation 
Please see LIQUID, p. 08 



The 



Echo Staff 



Michele Hatler 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/ 

Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 

Business Manager 

Brett Rowland 

News Editor 

Karen Peterson 
Arts & Features Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Opinon Editor 



Katie Bashaw 

Sports Editor 

Scott Gasperino 
Photo Editor 

Eric Ingemunson 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Heather Molloy 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes comments 
on its articles as well as on the newspaper itself. However, the 
staff acknowledges that opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, 
-editorials, letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restriction*, accuracy and style. All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



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8 The Echo 



Opinion 



April 9, 2003 



Liquid Continued 

can not project force on a worldwide scale as it would 
wish. 

Liquid asset number three, perhaps the most seri- 
ous: time. Time flows in liquid fashion, quickly, like a 
river, and every nation wishes to master time for its own 
purpose — the ability to do something quicker, cheaper, 
longer and in more plentiful amounts. The race of our 
global economy and our global ecology is a race against 
time. Too much population growth is occurring too fast. 
Too few novel sources of vital raw materials are being dis- 
covered too late. Too many nations are industrializing at 
once with too many new consumers demanding all of the 
energy intensive luxuries that the Western world has taken 
for granted. Too much industrial pollution is producing 
too deleterious an effect on our climate and our ozone. Too 
many uncertain variables cloud the future of this nation 
and this species. Too many worldwide worries and too 
little time. In a race against time, you increase your lead to 
prolong it. In a race for economic growth, you comer the 
remaining markets. In a race for oil, you establish a secure 
and plentiful supply. In a race for military hegemony, you 
secure a platform from which you can project force across 



one of the most volatile regions of the world. In a race for 
human survival, you" rri"ake sure that your small pocket of 
humanity will survive the longest. In all cases, it is a race 
against time. . .and the clock is ticking. 

The United States is fighting a war in Iraq right now 
for liquid assets. Liquid, as we may have noticed, is hard 
to hold onto and even harder to control. Lao Tzu once 
wrote that "Great good is said to be like water, sustaining 
life with no conscious striving, flowing naturally, provid- 
ing nourishment, found even in places which desiring 
man rejects" (Tao Te-Ching, 8:1-5). Sometimes liquid is 
indeed a good thing. However, in our present situation, 
the inverse appears to be true. Great danger is like liquid, 
destroying life unconsciously, flowing over all humankind 
indiscriminately, providing violence, creating uncertainty 
in the places we need it least. 

In our quest to master all of these liquid assets— blood, 
oil and time— we have a strong likelihood of succeeding 
on the first two counts. The U.S. military is the most pow- 
erful in the world. It is not a question of if Saddam Hus- 
sein will fall, but when. In tandem with his removal, we 
will secure our access to Iraq's plentiful oil reserves and 
ease some of our uncertainty about our energy supplies. 



(Whether either of these are goals that the United States 
should have undertaken or not is up for serious debate, 
but we are now engaged in the conflict and we must see it 
through to its conclusion, regardless of the consequences). 
What remains to be seen is whether or not we can master 
the liquid asset of time. Time has a way of laying waste 
to all the affairs of mortal nations, great or small. Already, 
time eats away at the foundations of our nation's suprem- 
acy, as well as eating away at the foundations of human 
survival on this planet. We might find a way to gain more 
time; lengthen the number of years we can continue to ex- 
pand our identity, our economy and our power in all direc- 
tions, or we might not. Perhaps America's great dreams of 
global hegemony, of preserving our version of paradise for 
as long as possible, will finally suffer a fate that F. Scott 
Fitzgerald, author of "The Great Gatsby," knew only too 
well: "The orgiastic future that year by year recedes before 
us. ..It eluded us then, but that's no matter — tomorrow we 
will run faster, stretch out our arms farther.. .And one fine 
morning — So we beat on, boats against the ourrent, borne 
back ceaselessly into the past." 



Fear, factions, forethought and the future 



By Adam Martin 
Columnist 



"We all know that in all matters of mere opinion that 
[every] man is insane — just as insane as we are. ..we know 
exactly where to put our finger upon his insanity: it is 
where his opinion differs from ours." — Mark Twain 

Once in early 2000, I attended a panel discussion in 
the Samuelson Chapel. The panelists and audience de- 
bated the merits of a California state initiative that would 
specify that the legal definition of a marriage was only 
valid for one man and one woman (ostensibly to strike 
down any future "gay marriage" initiatives). Though I per- 
sonally thought the proposition in question a tad ludicrous 
(there was already a law in the books in California saying 
the exact same thing), the forum piqued my curiosity. I 
could not help but notice that on the panel, four speakers 
were against the measure while only one spoke in its favor. 
I also could not help but notice that a sizable portion of my 
fellow CLU students in attendance were in favor of the 
measure (i.e. they believed gay marriage was wrong), and 
they seemed irritated at having only one favorable voice 
on the panel. 

I also recall an event I recently attended this year, 
billed as a "faculty conversation" on the impending con- 
flict in Iraq. All four professors in attendance had grave 
reservations about our entry into the war and questioned 
the wisdom of President Bush's decision to issue a uni- 
lateral ultimatum to Iraq. In a fashion similar to the afore- 
mentioned event, one or two students seemed visibly upset 
at the apparent lack of favorable opinions — one even went 
so far as to call the impartiality and non-partisanship of 
the professors on the panel into question, thus indicating 
that this was only part of a larger (and in his mind, disturb- 
ing) trend of the CLU faculty to uniformly voice opinions 
biased in favor of "leftist" or "liberal" positions, no matter 
what the issue. 

Both events gave me pause and prompted reflection. 
The more I continue to think about it, the more it seems 
as though there is a tangible disconnection between the 
faculty and students of this university when it comes to a 
number of tough questions. 

In theory, "the university encourages critical inquiry 
into matters of both faith and reason. The mission of the 
university is to educate leaders for a global society who are 



strong in character and judgment, confident in their iden- 
tity and vocation, and committed to service and justice." 
This is what the mission statement says, anyway. Where 
we seek "critical inquiry," is there instead mere criticism? 
Where we seek inquiries into "faith and reason," is there 
instead too great a polarization between hopelessly blind 
faith and mechanistically arid reason? Are we truly learn- 
ing to think globally, or does the globe merely revolve 
around ourselves? 

Over the years, I have never doubted the integrity of 
the CLU faculty and their commitment to developing my 
skills of critical thinking. I do, however, note that there 
are some faculty members.. who have less hesitation about 
speaking their minds than others, not always with fruitful 
or helpful results. I have never doubted the diversity of 
people and opinions among the CLU student body, either. 
I do, however, note that some students seem singularly 
combative in both the views they hold and how they voice 
them. 

Far be it from me to state that I have my finger on 
the ideological pulse of the campus, but the polarization 
seems increasingly clear — either the faculty of this in- 
stitution are perceived as leaning too far "left" for their 
own good or the student body has grown increasingly and 
uncritically "conservative" over the years. It seems like an 
unspoken assumption that none of us voice. Nonetheless, 
it hangs like fresh maple syrup, coating and permeating 
everything we say and do. 

Where came this polarization? What are the deeper 
reasons for our divisions? Are these merely different 
opinions or lines of battle? Are these battles over secular 
matters or sacred matters? There are many questions, but 
as of yet, few definite answers — precisely because we do 
not ask each other the questions. We are afraid of asking 
the questions, or we erroneously assume we already know 
the answers. 

Obviously I take part in these affairs, and many of my 
peers and I simply agree to disagree on a host of issues. 
However, even if you disagree with your next-door neigh- 
bor and dislike him, he is still going to be living next door 
tomorrow— a fact you will have to deal with whether you 
like it or not. The worry I occasionally harbor is that we 
at CLU are increasingly unwilling to leave it at that. We 
begin to see every teacher's opinion as religious or politi- 
cal propaganda, and we begin to see our fellow students 
not as neighbors to be allowed their space, but as potential 



converts to whom we must proselytize our chosen "gospel 
truth." 

Differences in worldview are one thing. The health of 
the community is another. A problem exists on this cam- 
pus, and it is a very dangerous game indeed. The spirit of 
critical inquiry is in doubt, and the integrity of the class- 
room itself is questioned. There is mutual distrust between 
students and teachers. It is a problem that Christ knew 
well: "Every kingdom divided against itself is brought to 
desolation; and a house divided against a house falleth" 
(Luke 11:17). 

I do not know where this rift started, or when, or how. 
All I do know is that whether you count yourself "liberal" 
or "conservative," student or teacher, this rift must be 
healed. Healing does not mean agreement or consensus; 
I would be disappointed if it did. Healing does mean that 
the vitality and academic health of this institution are at 
stake. 

If teachers have a "problem student" who consistent- 
ly questions the validity of the subject matter or alleges 
teacher bias, private conversations should be arranged and 
understanding must be reached. If students perceive gross 
bias in their teachers or a slant in the presentation of the 
subject matter, then students must seek out their professors 
personally and voice these concerns. 

I do not agree with some of my peers, nor do I agree 
with some of my teachers. However, it behooves me to 
take both very seriously. Wherever one locates oneself on 
the ideological spectrum, I would advise all of us to take 
our peers and teachers — and our ideological differences 
with both— more seriously than we have done in the past. 
We live in rapidly changing times, and we cannot afford to 
bum bridges. We cannot remove the divisions we harbor 
based on conviction, but we should try to remove those 
divisions we base upon mutual fear. 

To quote Abraham Lincoln, "We must not be enemies. 
Though passion may have strained, it must not break our 
bonds of affection." The ties that bind, though they do not 
quench discord, must bind us still. Where mutual fear per- 
vades our classrooms, they are not classrooms but prisons. 
When mutual fear polarizes teachers and students, no true 
lessons are taught and no true learning takes place. When 
we do not take our fellow students and teachers seriously, 
then we do not take California Lutheran University itself 
seriously. 



Want to work for the Echo next 

year? 
Call 493-3465 



April 9, 2003 



Sports 



The Echo 9 



Holland wins tournament, 
Kingsmen place fifth 



By Luke Patten 
Staff Writer 



The CLU golf team has much to brag 
about over the last two weeks. They placed 
fifth out of 15 teams at the annual Kings- 
men Invitational, then got a conference 
win over Pomona in which they posted one 
of their best team scores of the season. 

Senior Matt Holland won the indi- 
vidual title at the Kingsmen Invitational on 
the strength of an even-par 72 in the final 
round. He shot a total of 228 (79-77-72) 
over the three round event. Holland is the 
first golfer in CLU history to place first in 
any tournament. 

Cal Lutheran would have been able 
to finish even higher than fifth except for 
disastrous second round in whic^ the team 
shot a 334. It was the highest round they 
have posted yet this year. They shot 317 
and 3 18 in the first and third rounds. 

The individual scores for the Kings- 
men consisted of Holland, freshman Adam 
Hollinger who finished with a 241 (80-82- 
79), freshman Peder Nyhus who held the 
opening round lead for the team but ended 
with a score of 249 (77-87-85), and junior 
Jordan Silvertrust who totaled a 251 (81- 
88-82). 

The Kingsmen then returned to 
SCIAC play by hosting Pomona. The key 



to the victory for 
the Kingsmen was 
that they got strong 
play across the 
board. The top three 
finishers for CLU 
all posted rounds 
of 76. 

The individual 
scores for Cal Lu- 
theran on the day 
were Nyhus (36- 
40), Silvertrust (38- 
38) and Holland 
(39-37) all finishing 
with 76. Hollinger 
(41-39) and fresh- 
man Austin Aker 
(44-36) tied for the 
fourth spot on the 
team with scores 
of 80. 

The team trav- 
eled to Texas this 
week to compete 
in the Mary-Hardin 
Baylor Tournament, 
but results were not 
available at press 
time. 




lotograph courtesy c 

Senior Matt Holland demonstrates the swing that helped him win 
the CLU Kingsmen Invitational on March 24-25. Holland is the 
first Kingsmen to ever win an individual golf title. He also tied 
for first against Pomona-Pitzer on April 3. 



this week's 

Kingsmen & 

Regals action 



Friday, April 11 

-softball at Pomona-Pitzer 
baseball at Claremont- 
Mudd-Scripps 

Saturday, April 12 

m tennis v. Pomona-Pitzer 
9:30 a.m. 
w tennis at Pomona-Pitzer 
track at CA/NV 
Championships 
San Diego State University 
-baseball v. CMS (2) 
11 a.m. & 2 p.m. 
-softball v. Pomona-Pitzer 
noon & 3 p.m. 

Tuesday, April 15 

golf at Whittier 

home games indicated by italics 



All-SCIAC team selections honor 
men and women basketball players 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



Freshman Lauren Stroot, senior Vic- 
tor Esquer and juniors Zareh Avedian 
and Ryan Hodges made the women's and 
men's All-SCIAC basketball teams, which 
were announced on March 6. 

Stroot led the Regals team in scoring 
with 32! points for the season and an aver- 
age 1 2.8 points per game. She also placed 
second in rebounds with 148. 

"It's definitely an honor, especially be- 
ing a freshman," Stroot said. 

"She was nomiated by the coaches of 
the SCIAC conference based on her over- 
all statistics," head coach Kristy Hopkins 
said. "It's nice that she's a freshman and 
she has three years left to play. All but one 
other [of the nominees] were juniors and 
seniors. 

"There's a lot of potential there. She 
hasn't reached her peak yet; she has the 
potential to be even better." 

The men's team also has room to 
grow. 

"They're very skilled basketball play- 
ers," head coach Rich Rider said of Esquer, 
Avedian and Hodges. "From a statistical 
point of view, these guys ranked very high 
in all the conference stats. I think the rest of 
the league saw that and voted for them for 
all-conference based upon that. 

"For example, this is the third time 
Victor Esquer's made First Team all-con- 
ference in the league. He brings a lot of 
senior leadership. He was second in our 
team in scoring. He led the league in steals 
[and] free throw percentage so he was our 
leader, no question about it. 

"Zareh Avedian led the league in scor- 



ing, set a SCIAC record for most field 
goals in one season and also was second in 
all-time scoring for a conference season. 

"Ryan Hodges was sixth on the all- 
time SCIAC record as far as field goal 
percentage. He was also about eighth in 
the league in scoring and about third in the 
league in rebounding." 

According to Avedian, all-season 
workouts, going hard at practice and giv- 
ing 1 00 percent helped him the most to 
make the All-SCIAC team. 

"It was a lot of hard work and it's 
about being a team player," Avedian said. 

Junior Ryan Hodges, who made the 
men's Second Team, came back from a 
year away from the game and placed in 
fourth in the nation in field goal percent- 
age (.655). 

"I wasn't really sure how well I would 
be able to play," Hodges said. "As soon as I 
started playing with the guys, I just fit right 
in. I'm looking forward to next year. Hope- 
fully we can win the SCIAC." 

According to Rider, the coaches in the 
league vote on who is selected for an All- 
SCIAC team. 

"At our league meeting, each coach 
will nominate from his team. We discuss 
them briefly, and then the other coaches 
vote on who they feel deserves to be voted 
onto the all-conference teams. We can't 
vote for our own team. 

"I'm looking forward to having Zareh 
back, along with Ryan. We're going to 
miss Victor's leadership, but he's provided . 
a lot of spark to our team and tremendous 
leadership the last four years." 




1 

k ■ 1 





top: junior Ryan Hodges 
bottom: junior Zareh Avedian 




Sports 



April 9. 2003 



The Echo 11 



Kingsmen baseball has a record- 
setting sw eep of Occidental Tigers 



By Sean-Micheal Porter 
Staff Writer 



A record-breaking pitching perfor- 
mance from junior Jason Hirsh set the tone 
for a superb weekend as the Cal Lutheran 
baseball team swept Occidental College in 
a three game series winning, 16-0, Friday, 
April 4, at North Field, and then winning, 
24-5, and, 27-0, Saturday, April 5 at Oxy. 

The 27-run-game was a season high 
for CLU. They scored in every inning but 
the seventh and made 26 hits. Seniors J.R. 
Cortez and Jeff Meyers, along with junior 
Ryan Hostetler, had outstanding perfor- 
mances. Cortez went 4-for-4 with six 
RBI and four runs scored, while Meyers 
was 4-for-5 with five RBI and three runs. 
Hostetler also went 4-for-4 and added four 
runs. Cortez and Meyers each went deep 
twice. 

Senior Ryan Melvin pitched five in- 
nings and struck out three Tigers in the 
win. Starting pitcher for Occidental Col- 
lege Adrian Mols gave up 1 3 runs in only 
three innings and took the loss. 

In the opening game on Saturday, a 
total of 12 batters from both teams were 
hit by pitches, breaking the NCAA Divi- 
sion III record of 1 1 set in 1998. Ten of the 
batters were Kingsmen, which also tied a 
NCAA Division III record set in 1998. 

CLU jumped on the Tigers early scor- 
ing five runs in each of the first three in- 



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nings. Senior Taylor Slimak went 3-for-4 
with four RBIs and four runs scored, while 
senior Brian Skaug finished 2-for-3 with 
four RBI and three runs. 

"We finally started to swing it again," 
said senior Matt James. 

Junior Josh Benson shut out Oxy for 
five innings and picked up the win. The 
Tigers did put up a fight, scoring three runs 
in the sixth and two in the eighth off back- 
to-back home runs. 

Although offense was the theme for 
this series, the player who made the most 
noise this weekend was junior Jason Hirsh. 
In game one of the series, Hirsh struck out 
18 batters, breaking the prior school sin- 
gle-game record of 17, set in 1993. Hirsh 
was flawless throwing a no-hitter until the 
eighth inning when a Tiger batter spoiled 
it with a one-out single. That was the only 
hit Hirsh gave up for the rest of the after- 
noon. He retired the side four times and 
only walked three. The 18 K's was also a 
personal best for Hirsh. 

"I was feeling pretty good," Hirsh 
said. "At the time, I had no idea I was 
breaking a record." 

On top of an excellent pitching perfor- 
mance, Kingsmen batters provided plenty 
of offensive firepower scoring 16 runs on 
1 6 hits. Slimak and junior Ed Edsall each 
had three hits with Slimak scoring three 
runs and Edsall knocking in five RBI. 
James hit his first career home run, a solo 




photograph h\ I .nit.i kojym 
Junior Jason Hirsh acheived a personal besl with 18 strikeouts against Occidental this 
weekend. In the one-hitter, Hirsh also broke the previous school record of 1 7. set in 
1993. 



shot in the ninth inning. 

"Everyone contributed this weekend," 
Skaug said. "We have a tough series ahead 
of us and I am optimistic about it." 

In the three game series, CLU recorded 
a jaw-dropping 67 hits to the Tigers 5. 

Over the break, the Kingsmen fell to 
Rutgers-Newark, 12-11, on March 19, lost 
two against Chapman, 1 1 - 1 , March 2 1 and. 



7-2, March 22, beat North Central, 16-0, 
March 26, and were defeated by Vanguard. 
8-4, on March 27. 

Along with the three victories over 
Occidental, CLU improved to 19-10 over- 
all and is in first place with a 1 0-2 record in 
conference play. 

The Kingsmen will play at Claremont- 
Mudd-Scripps April 1 1 . 



Kingsmen and Regals 
continue to reign supreme 



By Victor Esquer 
Staff Writer 



The Cal Lutheran men's tennis team 
continued the domination of its opponents 
by defeating twelfth-ranked Middlebury 
College, 4-3, it then traveled up north and 
blanked Westmont, 7-0. In SCIAC action, 
Cal Tech was no match for the Kingsmen 
as they shut out the Techies in a 7-0 win. 
Amir Marandy continued to prove why 
he is one of the top players in the nation 
as he is still yet to be beaten. He defeated 
Parth Venkat of Cal Tech easily (6-1, 6-0), 
in the No. 1 singles match. Arif Hasan 
and Junya Hasebe were also victorious, 
as were Quinn Calderon, Joel Wetterholm 
and Ryan Felix in their singles matches. 
In the No. 1 doubles match, Calderon and 
Sean Ruitenberg defeated Venkat and John 
Howard 8-0. 

"We feel that we have a great chance 
of winning nationals, so we keep pushing 
each other everyday to get better. We had 
a couple of losses early on in the year, but 
those only made us better and it prepared 
us to get ready for the most important part 
of the season which is this month. Our 
goal is nationals and were going to lay it 
all on the line," said Ruitenberg. 

The Kingsmen are 10-3 overall. 

The Regals have also stayed hot and 
have managed seven straight wins and 
pushed their overall record to 12-2. In 
SCIAC play, the Regals are untouch- 
able with a 6-0 record. The Regals have 
been busy this last month with wins over 
Skidmore College, 6-3, they then topped 



Santa Cruz, 7-2. After the win 
over Santa Cruz, they traveled 
down south to San Diego where 
they took care of business and 
defeated Alliant International 
University, 7-2. The Regals next 
defeated Vanguard University, 
6-3, they then came back home 
and blanked Pacific Lutheran, 
9-0. Finally, back in SCIAC ac- 
tion, the Regals had no problem 
with Cal Tech as once again they 
swept all their matches and won 
9-0. Jen Hansen defeated Mariya 
Nomanbhoy 6-2, 6-0 in the No. 1 
singles. Becca Hunau and Lisa 
Novajosky were also victorious 
as were Blair Murphy, Aimee 
Fiore and Stephanie Perkins in 
their respective singles matches. 
In the No. I doubles match Hunau 
and Novajosky had no problem 
with Nomanbhoy and Jenny 
Hsiao as they defeated them, 8-1. 
Novajosky is not surprised at her 
teams' success. 

"We practice hard every- 
day and we are doing whatever 
it takes to be the best, and that 
means doing the little things. We 
know that individually we each 
have to do our part in order for 
us to be successful and we have 
been doing that. Hopefully we 
can keep this streak going," said 
Novajosky. 

The Regals look to keep the 
streak going against Southwestern 
on April 7. 




photograph by Diana Filpcsco 
Amir Marandy remains undefeated with only one 
SCIAC match left in the season. 



12 The Echo 



Sports 



April 9, 2003 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Sign-ups start today for two events sponsored by the Office of Intramural Sports: 
BOWLING TOURNAMENT, April 10 @ 9 p.m. - $2 deposit required at signup 

KICKBALL TOURNAMENT, April 16 @ 5 p.m. - 8-on-8 (two females required) 
Signups at the SUB Front Desk - Call x3302 with questions 



SOFTBALL 
STANDINGS 

Field Stompers 

Tools 

Pink Bunny Rabbits 

Soiland 

Holy Hitters 

#1 Stunnaz 

Fo Sho Fo Sho 

Daryl Strawberry 

Dirty South 

Bogards 

Weekend Warriors 

Hang Ten 

Hot Potatoes 

Big Purple Machine 

Dogs with Legs 

Your Grandpa's Daughter 0-3 (22) 

Coconut Crushers 0-3(10) 

John Morse 0-3 (9) 

Utah Jamz 0-2 (6) 



.L 


Softball 


GS 


ALL-STARS 


3-0 (48) 


Rob Simmons 


3-0 (41) 


Brian Weinberger 


2-0 (47) 


Billy Proctor 


2-0 (41) 


RJKey 


2-0 (29) 


Kasi Benbrook 


2-0 (28) 


Carly Sandell 


2-0 (22) 


Donny Reid 


2-0 (20) 


Lauren Habib 


2-1 (23) 


Dean Klipfel 


1-1 (20) 


Steve Perry 


1-1 (26) 


Mike Corso 


1-1 (20) 


Jenna Cristiano 


1-1 (17) 


Nik Namba 


0-2 (9) 


Qjjinn Cai.daron 


0-2 (5) 
n-^ n->\ 





Basketball 

ALL-STARS 

Chris Hargrave 

Derek Clarke 

Jack Robinson 

Joey Montano 

Ryan Tukua 

Jonathan Fielder 

Ryan Dix 

Per Sandstrom 

Landon Ray 

Ang Monden 

Steve Perry 

Jason Angell 

Scott Barwick 

Cam Robinson 

Tim Huck 

Mike Judd 

Alex Espinoza 



BASKETBALL 


STAADinGS 


Diuinius Lucus 


4-0 


Sloppy Seconds 


4-0 


Chips 6 Salsa 


2-1 


Best Coast All-Sthrz 


2-1 


Basketball Jewries 


2-1 


High Rollers 


2-2 


Bumblebees 


2-2 


Bolla IHoose 


2-2 


III Tehipered 


1-1 


Gippers 


1-1 


Black Paathers 


1-2 


Free Agents 


1-2 


GOODEELLAS 


1-3 


TEAm Tuf-Skia 


0-3 


Beaiti Teaia 


0-3 



EAST vs. WEST DODGEBALL 




On March 11, the West 
side of Campus chal- 
lenged the East side to 
a Dodgeball match. The 
Underclassmen won the 
matchup. 



A Rematch is scheduled 
for April 29 at 10 p.m. 
in the gym. the eastside 
is instructed to wear red, 
the westside blue. 



SPONSORED BY YOUR LOCAL RA S. CALL 

Adam Jussell, x2317, with ques- 
tions. 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 43, No. 21 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



Sports 

Softball finishes the season 
in first place. 



See story page 10 



April 16, 2003 



Features 

Career Services offers assistance 
to students and alumni. 



See story page 5 



News 

Safety and convenience fuel 
next year s renovation plans. 



See story page 3 



CLU dances at Disneyland 



By Christa Hudson 
Staff Writer 



Over 400 students gathered at 
Disney's Paradise Pier Hotel at the Dis- 
neyland Resort for California Lutheran 
University's annual Spring Formal. 
Programs Board members said the event 
was a success. 

The event recorded one of the largest 
turnouts ever. The ballroom was twice 
the size as last year's room. 

"The dance floor was crowded, but it 
was the biggest one that the hotel had to 
offer. They tried to give us a smaller one, 
but Elissa Jordan insisted that we would 
need the extra space and she was right," 
said Programs Board member Kristen 
Mathre. 

Even with the large dance floor, 
many students complained that they felt 
cramped While dancing. 

"I had a wonderful time at Spring 
Formal. My top three suggestions for fu- 
ture dances would be more air condition- 
ing, cheaper alcohol and a larger dance 
floor. It got very tight," junior Robert 
Howie said. 

"Overall, the deejay played a lot of 
fun songs and when he didn't play some- 
thing to my taste, I went and took a water 
break," said Stine Odegard. 

Last year. Programs Board received 
complaints about the deejay. He played 
unappreciated loud music over dinner 
and seemed to ignore people's requests. 

This year, the deejay was given a list 




Photograph by Rebecca Hunau 
(From left) Josh Lubin, Tyrell Miles and 
Elliot Richards at Spring Formal. 

of songs to play and responded well to 
audience input. 

"He played stuff everyone enjoyed, 
even slow songs for the girls. He did a 
pretty good job of playing a variety of" 
music for everyone's taste," Howie said. 

"I really liked the food; actually 
everyone at our table did. I had the veg- 
etarian pasta dish and it turned out to be 
quite tasty," Odegard said. 

The dessert consisted of a rich cir- 
cular chocolate mousse accompanied by 
a chocolate palm tree with strawberry 
syrup and a slice of fruit. 

"The food was really enjoyable. Lots 



Photograph by Rebecca Hunau 

A group of students wine and dine at the Disneyland Paradise Pier Hotel during CLU's 
annual Spring Formal, held last Saturday, April 11. 

of flavor and the dessert was very artis- 
tic," Howie said. 

Programs Board arranged for stu- 



dents who attended the dance to get a 
discount on ticket prices at Disneyland 
the following day. 

"I didn't go to the dance, but 1 liked 
the fact that Spring Formal was held at a 
place where you could go and meet up 
with your friends the next day. There 
was a huge group of us and we had a 
lot of fun. It was great to walk around 
Disneyland and see people you knew," 
sophomore Jessie McGihon said. 

Although students anticipated the 



traditionally long lines at Disneyland's 
theme park, many were surprised by 
uncommonly short lines. 

"The longest amount of time anyone 
in our group had to wait for a ride was 
15 to 20 minutes. It was great. It made it 
worthwhile to have the dance at Disney- 
land because it wasn't that far to drive 
and you had a pleasurable full weekend 
planned," Odegard said. 

Overall, students appeared to have 
a wonderful time at this year's event. 
Some students even abandoned the tra- 
ditional concept of going with a date and 
came with a group of their close friends. 



Senate passes bill to revamp park 



By Brandee Tecson 
Staff Writer 



The ASCLU Senate unanimously 
passed a resolution on Monday night al- 
lowing for the renovation of Kingsmen 
Park. 

The bill, which has been in develop- 
ment since the beginning of September, 
"strongly encourages the administration of 
California Lutheran University to renovate 
Kingsmen Park." 

Historically, Kingsmen Park has been 
a central location and home for many im- 
portant campus events for students as well 
as the neighboring community. 

It has been home to such events as 
the Kingsmen Shakespeare Festival, the 
Homecoming Carnival, the Scandinavian 
Festival, Earth Day, Freshman Orientation 
and the Graduation Luncheon. 

The bill states "Kingsmen Park should 
be a place for both residential and com- 
muter students to gather in order to build 



community, to further academic, intellec- 
tual and social growth and to provide an 
inviting place for students to relax between 
classes." 

Sophomore Senator Dominic Storelli 
was the mastermind behind many of the 
Kingsmen Park renovations and initially 
sponsored the bill. 

"I brought it to Senate's attention be- 
cause I felt that the park was not a fair rep- 
resentation of what a park and the center of 
campus should look like," Storelli said. "I 
believe that the park should be attractive 
and hold more functions, so the resolution 
was passed to make the administration 
come to this same realization." 

Originally, Storelli met with designer 
of the Garden of the Worlds in Thousand 
Oaks, Calif, who gave him a layout of 
what he thinks Kingsmen Park could po- 
tentially be. 

The renovation would include several 
changes and additions to the current state 
of the park. For one, the layout design 
would be in uniform with the university's 



"Master Plan." 

"Kingsmen Park represents the image 
of the university," Storelli wrote in the 
resolution. "The new features of Kings- 
men Park would improve the atmosphere 
and encourage the utilization of its full 
potential." 

Current lighting in Kingsmen Park, 
which has been a security and safety issue, 
would be significantly improved. The ren- 
ovation of the park would enhance greater 
electrical capabilities. 

A new gazebo bandstand would be 
built, thereby providing a permanent stage, 
which houses its own sound system. The 
bridges in the park would be upgraded 
and restored to its old appearance. Storelli 
would like this to be the primary concern 
for the overhaul. 

"Out of the entire park, I wish that the 
administration would tackle this issue first. 
Once the bridges are completed, the rest of 
the park will flow together nicely," Storelli 



said. 

The renovation would also provide 
"study nooks" available to students near 
Kingsmen Creek. 

At-Large Senator Natalie Roberts 
sponsored the bill along with Storelli and 
says that this has been his vision from the 
start. 

"It's been his dream," said Roberts, 
a senior. "This is a major revamping that 
would give Kingsmen Park a whole new 
look." 

Since the project is still in its beginning 
stages, the resolution must now be passed 
on to CLU President Luther Luedtke who 
will take it into consideration. 

If President Luedtke passes the bill, 
the university would then need to find a 
donor to finance the massive undertaking. 

"It takes a combination of a lot of 
factors," said Roberts of the large-scale 
venture. "But I think it has a good chance 
of happening in the future." 



Calendar 



2 The Echo 



April 16,2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 




ASCLU-G Frog rams Board Meeting 

Ny green 2 
6:30 p.m. 



today 

april 16 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10a.m. 

Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Rotaracl Club Meeting 

Overton Hall 
8 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel 
9:11 p.m. 



thursday 

april 17 




friday 

april 18 



Good Friday 

No Classes 



10a 

f 



* 



Sunday 

april 20 

Happy Easter!!! 

monday 

april 21 

Classes begin at 4 p.m. 



g'VSX ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

* i. \ Nygreen 2 




:30 p.m. 



tuesday 



ASCLU-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
5:15 p.m. 



Sister Friends 

Chapel Lounge 
5:15 p.m. 

Asian Club and Friends 

Pederson Lounge 
6 p.m. 



classifieds 



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the Calendar page for a flat rate 

regardless of word count. Discount 

available for multiple issue orders. 

Ads are subject to editing for content 

& clarity. 

Call: 

(805) 493-3865 



The Math Lab at California Lutheran University 

Why pay high prices for private math tutors when you can get tutored for free? 

At the Math Lab we offer FREE tutoring for all math from basic Algebra to Calculus and beyond! 

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Suite Selection 



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California Lutheran University 

Delivers Student Financial Aid Award 

Packages Online 

"Your Electronic Award" Solution 

Speeds and Simplifies Process, 

Makes Awards Easy to Understand and 

Evaluate 

Beginning in April 2003, California Lutheran 

University is presenting financial aid award 

packages to all students online - speeding the 

notification process and enabling students to 

finalize financial arrangements sooner. 

Each online award notification is accompanied 

by additional tools and Web links to help students 

evaluate their preferred financing methods. 



April 16,2003 



News 



The Echo 3 



Expo eases job worries 



By Heather Ladwig 
Staff Writer 



Last Thursday afternoon, over 40 com- 
panies gathered around the vicinity of the 
flagpole to collect resumes and speak with 
prospective employees. 

Over 300 graduating students and 
alumni attended this event that started to 
take shape over five months ago. 

For the past month, students received 
mass e-mails and notes in their campus 
mailboxes from Career Services about the 
event. 

"I knew about the career expo for a 
while, and I feel good about the companies 
I spoke with and the amount of information 



I took from the experience," said senior 
business major Matthew Martinson. 

Students were urged to register for the 
expo ahead of time. Resumes and profes- 
sional dress attire were also highly recom- 
mended. 

In order to be ready for on spot in- 
terviews, many notices suggested that 
students research the companies they were 
interested in prior to the event and famil- 
iarize themselves on the background of the 
company. 

The purpose of the expo was to give 
California Lutheran University students 
a head start with the tedious application 
process of a new job. Students were also 
given the opportunity to ask the questions 



that most interested them in an informal 
atmosphere. 

Planning for this event started in No- 
vember of last year. For many company 
representatives, it was their first time to 
CLU. 

AFLAC representative Joy Gunderson 
was one such representative. Although it 
was her first time to CLU, she thought it 
was a beautiful campus. 

"The students seem very motivated 
and interested in finding out what is out 
there in the marketplace," Gunderson said. 

A major goal of this event was to have 
a wide variety of companies represented. 
Among the fifty-something companies 
who attended the expo were Casa Pacifica, 



MTV Bunim-Murray Productions, Simi 
Valley Unified School District and Wash- 
ington Mutual. 

"The expo was a success. Only one 
employer did not show up. We had about 
300 students attend who signed up and 
many more that just passed through," said 
Director of Career Services Cindy Lewis. 
"Companies were very impressed with the 
event from what we read on their evalua- 
tions." 

Students who could not attend the 
career expo can upload their resume to 
www.clupostings.com and post a job 
search there, or contact Career Services for 
further guidance. 



Board of Regents awards promotions 



By Heather Ladwig 
Staff Writer 



Last month, the California Lutheran 
University Board of Regents promoted 
two faculty members to the rank of associ- 
ate professor and four faculty members to 
the rank of full professor. 

The promotions are effective in Au- 
gust of this year. 

Michaela Reaves. Ph.D., of the history 
department and Michael Roehr, M.F.A., 
director of technical theatre in the drama 
department were recently promoted to the 
rank of associate professor. 

Promoted to the rank of full professor 
are Xiang Chen, Ph.D., of the philosophy 
department; Sharon Docter, Ph.D., of the 



communications department; Kenneth 
Gardner, M.F.A., of the drama department; 
and Wyant Morton, D.M.A., of the music 
department. 

Music major Stine Odegard sees Dr. 
Morton's promotion as a great thing for the 
music department. 

"I think he has already taken the music 
department to another level. He is innova- 
tive, hardworking and he is respected by 
the students," Odegard said. 

The process of a promotion is a long 
one. There are four different ranks for 
faculty: instructor, assistant, associate and 
full. 

Docter started teaching at CLU as an 
instructor and after the recent promotion is 
now ranked full. 



"I was happy to have the opportunity 
to apply for the promotion because it gave 
me the opportunity to reflect on elements 
of my job that are most important. I got 
the chance to reflect on my advising, my 
scholarship and also my service to the 
CLU community as a whole," Docter said. 

Each faculty member must be evalu- 
ated and recommended in order to receive 
a promotion. The A.R.T. committee is 
responsible for this evaluation and recom- 
mendation process. 

The chair of the committee is Edward 
Julius of the school of business. Other 
committee members include Paul Gath- 
ercoal of the school of education, Daniel 
Geeting of the music department, Melvyn 
Haberman of the English department. 



Linda Ritterbush of the geology depart- 
ment and Bruce Stevenson of the English 
department. 

Based on the evaluations of the com- 
mittee, recommendations are then made 
to the Provost and Dean of the Faculty 
Pamela Jolicoeur. 

Eventually, candidates make their way 
to the Board of Regents where the final ap- 
proval is given for promotion. 

"The students have a major impact 
on faculty promotions in that their voices, 
as expressed in course evaluations, carry 
considerable weight in the process," Joli- 
coeur said. "There is an impact on students 
overall in a higher level of teaching effec- 
tiveness as standards and expectations are 
applied through the review process." 



Safety, convenience RHA starts transition 
fuel 2004 renovations 



By Heather Hoyt 
Staff Writer 



By Gianina Lomedico 
Staff Writer 



Safety and convenience are reasons 
why the Facilities and Operations Planning 
Department are making many upgrades, 
improvements and replacements totaling 
$760,000 at California Lutheran Univer- 
sity for the 2003-2004 school year. 

"The university gives $750,000 
to maintenance which is a tremendous 
amount of money," said Ryan Van Om- 
meren, director of facility operations and 
planning. "The majority of the money goes 
to residence halls, which demonstrates a 
strong commitment on the part of the uni- 
versity to improve the conditions students 
live in." 

In 2003-2004, the department will ren- 
ovate Afton Hall, costing $500,000, which 
is the most expensive improvement for the 
university's renovations. The department 
also will work on replacing New West Flat 
Roofs and New West HVAC (Heating Ven- 
tilation and Cooling Equipment). Other re- 
placements are K Building exterior doors, 
recarpeting Mount Clef corridor and the 
Apartments corridor lighting. Improve- 
ments include Peters Hall 105 and I05A, 
lighting in the study area and painting the 
K-l building. 

The full renovation of the Afton Hall 
is scheduled for this summer. It includes 
an installed sprinkler system and an up- 



grade on the fire alarm system and HVAC 
controls. The wood shake roofs will be 
replaced with metal roofing for safety rea- 
sons. Facilities plans to construct bedroom 
walls and provide bedroom lighting. The 
department will change entries to the key- 
less system and remodel dorm suites. 

Senior Michelle Nathan, who current- 
ly lives in Afton Hall, likes that Facilities is 
installing doors in Afton Hall, although she 
does believe the loft should be taken out, 
which houses five residents. The loft will 
soon be replaced with a lounge. 

"They need to put more rooms rather 
than upgrading other areas. I think lounges 
are nice, but not a necessity. Comfortable 
housing should come first," said Nathan, a 
psychology major. 

The Facilities Department will reno- 
vate Conejo Hall next year. A South Cam- 
pus Residential Hall, which has not been 
approved by the Board of Trustees, is a 
possible plan in the fall of 2005. The hall 
will be located south of the residence hall 
swimming pool. The three-story hall could 
house 84 people and will include a new 
parking area. * 

Junior John Walsh said making im- 
provements for the campus is important. 
But, he believes that most of the improve- 
ments do not affect him directly. 

"The school's improvements usually 
benefit someone else's living conditions, 
but not my own living conditions," said 
Walsh, a computer science major. 



Last week's Residence Hall Asso- 
ciation meeting was short, with only a few 
events still to plan. This was the last RHA 
meeting of the semester consisting only of 
current RHA members. 

Next week's meeting will be a transi- 
tion meeting held with the outgoing and 
incoming RHA members. Outgoing RHA 
members were asked to fill out officer 
worksheets explaining their duties so that 
they may be discussed at the next meeting. 

Alex Mallen will be the new RHA 



director and she will conduct some work- 
shops for the new RHA members. 

Last minute details for planning and 
marketing were discussed for the Easter 
Egg Hunt and Spring Formal. 

"We have sold 435 tickets (to Spring 
Formal) so far and they are still on sale 
for three more hours," ASCLU President 
Nicole Hackbarth said on Monday. 

Outgoing RHA director Sara Placas 
gave a token of her appreciation at the 
meeting's closing and said, "Thank you 
(to all the RHA members). You have done 
some great work and your work has been 
recognized and appreciated!" 



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4 The Echo 



News 



April 16.2003 



Festival de Encuentros 

'Festival' brings best of Latino culture to CLU 



By Brandee Tecson 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University's 
eighth annual Festival de Encuentros 
kicked off with a bang on Monday, April 7, 
and continued through Friday, April 1 1 . 

The weeklong festival featured several 
special events targeted to provide students 
and interested members of the community 
insight into the Latino culture and tradi- 
tions. Festivities included traditional foods, 
music, dancing and other entertainment. 

CLU's Latin American Student Or- 
ganization in cooperation with the Mul- 
ticultural Programs Office sponsored the 
Festival de Encuentros. 

Junior Michelle Courtenay has been 
involved with LASO since her freshman 
year. She is currently the program's trea- 
surer. 

"I wanted to get involved so I could 
learn more about my mom's culture," said 
Courtenay, who is half Hispanic. "You're 
able to see stuff you wouldn't usually see 
here in America." 

A favorite Encuentros activity — salsa 
dancing and lessons — took place on 
Thursday, April 10, in the Pavilion during 
lunch. 

Sophomore Lindsay Rarick was one 
of the 20 students who participated in the 
free lessons. 




Photograph by Mike Beaumont 
Community educator Xochitl Gomez lectures students andfacidty in the SUB pavilion 
Friday during the weeklong "Festival de Encuentros. " 



"It was fun because I've always want- 
ed to leam how to salsa dance," said Rar- 
ick, who went to Puerto Rico over Spring 
Break. "While we were there, my mom and 
I would watch everyone dance." 

Senior Stephanie Minor taught stu- 
dents a variety of sizzling salsa moves over 
an hour period. 

"I love dancing," Minor said. "How- 
ever, learning how to teach is a challenge, 
but it's very rewarding and every class is 



so different." 

Minor, an English and multimedia 
major, has been teaching dance for the last 
four years and currently has her own class 
in Camarillo, Calif. 

Other lunchtime activities included a 
live mariachi band on Monday, lunch with 
Latino faculty, staff and administration on 
Tuesday, a "Pulga" craft fair and swap meet 
on Wednesday and a lecture by community 
educator Xochitl Gomez on Friday. 



Vance Robbins, coordinator for CLU's 
Multicultural Programs, was one of the 
several staff members to take part in the 
lunch event on Tuesday. 

"I look forward to interacting with the 
students," said Robbins, who did much 
of the background work in setting up the 
festival. "I become hopeful when I see oth- 
ers, especially of other ethnicities, being 
involved." 

Robbins, who has worked for CLU 
since August, enjoyed conversing with the 
students. 

"I like watching the crowd come to- 
gether," Robbins said. 

Evening performances included Balie 
Folklorico, a usual highlight of the festival, 
which took place Monday evening. 

Local Latino rock bands Aeroseol 
and Jamboch performed for students on 
Thursday night. Other evening activities 
included a Latin movie night on Tuesday 
and a storytelling and poetry reading on 
Wednesday. 

The flags of various Latin countries 
such as Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colum- 
bia, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Puerto 
Rico and Venezuela were displayed on 
the flagpole and in the library during the 
week. 

A special Latino chapel service was 
also held on Wednesday in the Samuelson 



CLU opens doors to Programs Board plans 
prospective students final events of semester 



By Mark Glesne 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University opened 
its doors for the annual Admitted Students 
Day on Saturday, April 12. From the early 
morning until mid-afternoon, prospective 
and admitted students scouted out CLU, 
many with their parents. 

"Even if they haven't made up their 
minds, the students that came got a good 
perspective of the school and had a good 
time," said senior Presidential Host intem 
Daniel Carlton. 

Starting at 7:30 a.m., the Centrum 
opened for breakfast and the cheer and 
dance teams held interviews for prospec- 
tive members. Check-in took place from 
8:15 a.m. until 9:30 a.m., followed by ID 
pictures for those who have chosen to at- 
tend CLU this coming fall. Also starting at 
8:15 a.m. was Financial Aid, the Business 
Office and Residence Life activities. 

Financial Aid conducted approximate- 
ly 15-minute appointments while the Busi- 
ness Office took deposits from those who 
made up their minds that day. The first set 
of tours were given starting at 9 a.m., given 



by CLU student Presidential Hosts. 

"We got a lot of compliments on how 
well organized the entire event was; how 
smooth it went and how well laid out it 
was," said sophomore Liz Ardis, an admis- 
sions intern. 

The welcome addresses were fol- 
lowed with orientations and residence hall 
open houses. From 1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m., the 
Financial Aid office gave loan counseling 
to those who require loans. After lunch, 
students were able to attend a student panel 
entitled "Loving the LU," led by four cur- 
rent CLU students. While prospective 
and admitted students attended that, their 
parents/guardians attended a seminar of 
their own. Titled "Letting Them Go," this 
self-explanatory information session was 
conducted by Pastor Melissa Maxwell- 
Doherty. 

After more registration and open 
houses, the day came to a close in time for 
CLU students to make it to the CLU Spring 
Formal Dance. 

"The day went really well. Everyone I 
talked to had nothing but good to say, and 
I think they got a good look at the school," 
said junior Presidential Host Keith Jones. 



By Christa Hudson 
Staff Writer 



Have a great 
Easter break! 



Programs Board discussed the re- 
maining events for the semester last Mon- 
day night, April 7. 

"Free Your Mind," coordinated by 
programs board member Kristin Mathre, 
will be held on May 9, the week before 
finals. Its intent is to help students relax 
and prepare for finals. 

At the meeting, members debated 
over budget concerns for this event. The 
board had to decide between spending its 
allocated funding on giant blow-up toys 
or Jamba Juice. 

In previous years, Spirit Day, now 
called "Free your Mind," had large blow- 
up toys; the general consensus was to dis- 
tribute its financial resources for Jamba 
Juice. 

"We believed that purchasing 500 
Jamba Juice drinks for CLU students 
would bring in a larger crowd and be 
more community building," Mathre said. 

The 500 Jamba Juice drinks will cost 
$1,300. 

"Although it's expensive, we were 
lucky because Jamba Juice did give us 
a deal. Normally it's $3 or so for a small 
drink times the amount we are ordering 
(500), would cost us over $1,500. So we 
are saving money," Mathre said. 

The board is considering looking 
into the price of renting a dunk tank for 
this event. They will also be investigat- 
ing alternative company's prices for giant 



blow-up toys to CLU students. Overall, 
the event appears to be running smoothly 
and on a timely schedule, board members 
said. 

The Lu Down is also calendared for 
the week before finals. It will be held at 
Borderline in Thousand Oaks and will 
commence at 8:30 p.m. 

"There will be a mechanical bull in 
the parking lot from 8:30 p.m until 10: 
30 p.m. The company will be supplying 
everything; it's very safe," board member 
Jackee Oshann said. 

Normally, Borderline has a cover 
charge of $5; however, the event will be 
free for the first 250 CLU students who 
bring an ID. 

"There will be appetizers from 9:30 
p.m. until about 10:30 p.m., and each of 
the 250 CLU students will get one free 
drink (soda) ticket," Oshann said. "A 
birthday list will be provided to Border- 
line so they can double check the age of 
students and no fake ID can be used." 

If a student were to show a fake ID, 
it would be up to the discretion of Bor- 
derline and its security department as to 
the course of action taken against that 
student. 

Although programs board has se- 
cured 250 spots for students. Borderline 
is still open to the public. 

This will allow CLU students to min- 
gle with one another and have a chance 
to meet someone new. The event starts at 
8:30 p.m. Students are welcome to stay 
until Borderline closes at 1 a.m. 



April 16, 2003 



Features 



The Echo 5 



Freshmen well adjusted now 



By Cameron Brown 
Staff writer 



The transition from home life to col- 
lege life, as a freshman, is a big change. 
The daily luxuries of a home-cooked meal 
a clean house and clean clothes that are 
nicely folded on one's bed, are nonexis- 
tent. 

Life begins anew and responsibility 
is entirely upon the shoulders of the col- 
lege student. 

So. how does one deal with such a 
transition? 

"Coming to California Lutheran Uni- 
versity was a huge change in lifestyle." 
freshman Nick Norian said. "I was the 



only student from my school to come 
here, so I was pretty much all alone and 
had to make new friends." 

Some students, like freshman David 
Zacks, decided to stay in their room and 
mope around. Others, like freshman Jon- 
athon Navarro, chose to congregate with 
fellow students, thinking that such inter- 
action would create new relationships. 

"I chose to be a homebody because I 
didn't know what else to do, "Zacks said. 
"I thought people would come to my room 
and randomly introduce themselves to me, 
but that was a foolish thought." 

According to Navarro, meeting new 
students and eventual friends was not that 
difficult. All it takes is an individual who 
is congenial and social, Navarro said. 



For others, meeting new people was 
nothing compared to establishing a solid 
friendship. 

"I did come from a small town 
where everyone knew everyone, but that 
didn't stop me from getting to know new 
people," freshman Kelsey Mitchell said. 
"I was sick of the small town atmosphere 
and wanted to get out and experience the 
city life." 

That was then, this is now. 

Walking around Mount Clef, Peder- 
son and Thompson, one notices a distinct 
difference in behavior. Students are no 
longer overwhelmed with anxiety or un- 
easiness. Now, freshmen appear more 
amiable and open-minded when it comes 
to interacting with other peers. 



According to Norian, most freshmen 
have adjusted to the new living environ- 
ment quite nicely. 

"Now that I am acquainted to the 
school and have made a set of friends, life 
seems to be much easier," Norian said. 

As the school year comes to an end, 
most students will depart this place they 
have called "home" and return to their 
previous residences. But summer will end 
and September will begin with the arrival 
of new and old students moving into their 
residential halls. 

"I will be looking forward to the end 
of the year, but I can't wait until I am 
sophomore, because 1 will be otder and 
have already adjusted to the college life," 
Navarro said. 



Campus Profile: Career Services 



By Christian Coleman 

STAFF WRITER 



A thanks goes out to the hard work 
and dedication of two dynamic individu- 
als, Cindy Lewis and Cynthia Smith, along 
with ten students working part time this 
semester. CLU students have a talented 
staff dedicated to providing them excellent 
career advice and support five days a week. 
Cindy Lewis, director of Career Services, is 
responsible for overseeing the day-to-day 
operations that go into providing excellent 
career service advice to CLU students and 
alumni. She is most involved with one-on- 
one counseling with students, organizing 
workshops and on-campus job fairs and 
building relationships with employers and 
other universities. She is a 1997 graduate 
from CLU's Master's program in career 
counseling and worked for Pepperdine 
University's career center before deciding 
to return to CLU approximately three years 
ago. Within the three years that she has 
worked at CLU, she has managed to imple- 
ment such new services as an updated data- 
base of employers, the purchasing of new 
books with current career information and 



the reorganization of all current services. 
She has also added new services like new 
workshops and guest speakers, more public 
relations to promote the new services to stu- 
dents and alumni, achieving job-placement 
goals, and starting a new online website that 
is more efficient and simpler to use for stu- 
dents and alumni. 

"My job is to reach out to CLU stu- 
dents and help them obtain employment by 
providing them with events and workshops, 
one-on-one counseling services, and up to 
date job and internship listings on the career 
services website. These are my tools in as- 
sisting CLU students and alumni with ques- 
tions and concerns regarding job placement 
or graduate school admission information," 
Lewis said. 

Some events and workshops spon- 
sored by CLU's Career Center are UCLA's 
Discussion of its Master's and Doctorate 
programs which was held on March 4. The 
Career Expo held on Thursday, April 10. 
The career center also sponsors on-campus 
interviews with employers such as Bank 
of America and New York Life Insurance 
State. The Federal Work study part-time ca- 
reer fair held every September before school 
begins, graduate school fair is held in late 



October outside the Humanities building, 
and student workshops are held in areas like 
resume writing, job searching, interviewing 
for offers, and salary negotiations. 

Along with more specialized services, 
the Career Center has improved its online 
services by having a sophisticated yet easy 
to use website called www.clupostings.com, 
which is currently being used by all CLU 
students and alumni. All of these new ser- 
vices are being funded by a $30,000 annual 
budget allocated by CLU to pay student 
workers to pay for resources like books, 
marketing materials, website improve- 
ments, and all events and workshops of- 
fered by the career center. 

Cynthia Smith, career counselor and 
recruitment coordinator, started working 
for CLU's career center at around the same 
time Cindy Lewis did. 

Now three years later, she has consult- 
ed hundreds of students and alumni seeking 
advice from how to explore a new career to 
deciding on which career to pursue. "My 
duty is to assist students and alumni with 
the process of deciding which career direc- 
tion to pursue or which career to transition 
to. Through individualized counseling ser- 
vices, workshops, and by using appropriate 



assessments, 1 can teach students techniques 
for self-assessment, researching, prioritiz- 
ing and goal setting," Smith said. 

The Career Center offers four dif- 
ferent assessments to help students and 
alumni focus on where to start their career 
research. The career center also uses a six 
step program for career success. These six 
steps are: (career exploration (this stage 
helps students to become aware of position 
titles, skills, educational requirements, and 
personal attributes needed to be successful 
in various fields); field research (this stage 
is useful in deciding between different 
fields to pursue); decision making (making 
a career decision), building your credentials 
and resume (this is an on going stage); pre- 
paring for the job search (this stage requires 
researching companies and organizations 
you want to work for); and launching a job 
search. 

Along with Cynthia and Cindy, there 
are ten part-time student workers this 
semester aiding the two full-time staff 
members. Their job duties are: assisting 
students with specific career resources, an- 
swering general questions, administrative 
duties, posting jobs online and assisting 
with events. 



Brown Bag Series: Women in composition 

Rv I pah Sanrhr? Zwilich. He played a piece from one of gins played a piece from "Fanfare #4 I learned many." 



By Leah Sanchez 
Staff writer 



How many of you know of any fe- 
male composers? That was the question 
that Mark Spraggins, from the California 
Lutheran University department of mu- 
sic started his lecture with on Tuesday, 
April 8 in the Women's Resource Center. 
Spraggins offered the group that attended 
information about three classical woman 
composers who are still living today and 
who have been successful in their profes- 
sions. 

Spraggins explained that until the 
20th century, classical composing was 
an "ol" boys club" and women had a hard 
time succeeding in the field. These days 
just as many female as men composers 
are coming out of graduate school, but 
opportunities are not yet equal. 

"It is more difficult for women to be 
taken seriously as composers," Spraggins 
said. 

Spraggins showed the group slides 
of three current women composers Libby 
Larsen, Joan Tower and Ellen Taaffe 



played 
each of their songs. 

According to Spraggins Libby Larsen 
has created over 200 various kinds of 
works and has received several awards 
including a 1994 Grammy. Larsen also 
co-founded an organization now called 
the American Composers Forum that has 
helped many composers though the hard- 
ships faced in the composing world. The 
song by Larsen that the group got to listen 
to was called "Comin' to Town," about a 
group of pioneers who were moving to 
Minnesota. The song got great feedback 
as the group laughed at the whoops and 
hollers of the supposed "pioneers" that 
Larsen included in the song. 

"I am going to try fo get her (Larsen) 
as a visiting composer," Spraggins said. 

The second composer, Joan Tower, 
had just as impressive a background as 
Larsen did Spraggins shared with the 
group facts about Tower's talents span- 
ning from composer to pianist and con- 
ductor. For 15 years, she played the piano 
with the Da Capo Chamber Players, an 
ensemble that was formed in 1969 and 
won a Naumburg Award in 1973. Sprag- 



gins played a pit 
For the Uncommon Woman" which also 
played at the gala concert in celebration 
of the centennial of Carnegie Hall in New 
York. The group agreed that Tower's mu- 
sic sounded like it could be in movies, but 
Spraggins explained that in the compos- 
ing world one is looked at as a sell-out if 
they put their music in movies. 

"It is very unfortunate that it has to 
be like that," said Jane Carron, member of 
the community. 

The third composer that Spraggins 
discussed with the group was Ellen Taaffe 
Zwilich. Zwilich is not only a composer, 
but also plays the violin and was the first 
woman to win the Pulitzer Prize in music 
which she was awarded for her "Sympho- 
ny No. I" in 1983. Zwilich's piece titled 
"The Thanksgiving Song" was played for 
the group. 

Spraggins' lecture left the audience 
informed about the talents of women 
composers. 

"I felt kind of ignorant after the lec- 
ture," Carron said. "It opened my eyes to 
the fact that there are quite a few classical 
women composers. It was fascinating and 



many. 

There are only a few Brown Bag lec- 
tures left this semester, "English today: 
love it or hate it!" on April 22, and "Fo- 
rensics: The science that leaves no stone 
unturned" on Tuesday April 29. 

"We only get the best," said Dr. Kat- 
eri Alexander, director of the Women's 
Resource Center. 



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6 The Echo 



Features 



April 16, 2003 



Campus Quotes 



What's your opinion of Bush? 




Bobbi Jo Cyr, business marketing major, Meagan Ranger, history major, class of Grant Toland, art major, class of 2006 Hana Albarran, psychology major, class 

class of 2003 2003 of 2003 

"1 think that he's our president; therefore, "I can't wait for 2004 so I can vote against "At least someone is taking charge and doing "I am not a big fan." 

we need to stand by the decisions he makes him." something and 1 like the fact that he makes up 

whether we're Democratic or Republican." his own words - More P ower ,0 him " 










Laura Asenas, music major, class of 2004 



"I think he's doing a good job running the 
country. I think the war is highly misun- 
derstood. A lot of people think that we're 
bullies, but I would rather see the situation 
taken care of now." 



Nicole Van Tilborg, psychology /sociology 
major, class of 2004 

"I dislike the man. I think he took us to war 
to finish off what his father could not." 



Davey Harding, multimedia/computer sci- 
ence major, class of 2006 



Melissa Harper, history/politic 
major, class of 2005 



"He is an awesome president and the "I think with the war in Iraq, that the Bush 
criticism he receives is unfair. He's led our administration is involved to gain money 
country through some of the toughest times and oil through the reconstruction of Iraq 
we've see in a long time." primarily by companies involved with the 

President's administration." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jon Gonzales 



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18 


8 






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38 




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35 


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81 




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46 






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67 






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I 



ACROSS 

I Indian weapon 
4 Smile 

8 Toothed tool 

I I Window glass 

1 2 Wife of rajah 

13 Direction (abbr.) 

14 Article 

15 Digit 
17 Smells 

19 Ballet dance step 
21 Brewed drink 

23 Wilhout discomfort 

24 Too 

26 Quill pen point 
28 Musical note 
30 Age 
32 Flightless bird 

34 Doctor's helpers (abbr.) 

35 Form of be 

37 Hold in bondage 

40 Near 

41 Sheep sound 

43 Inhabitant (suf.) 

44 School subject (abbr ) 
46 Former coin of India 
48 Inquire 

50 Challenge 



53 Sour 
55 Unhappy 

57 Quiel work place 

58 Grass with hard-walled stems 
60 Sweet potato 

62 Chinese distance measure 

63 7th Greek letter 

64 Space 
66 Food fish 

68 Jelly 

69 Eating utensil 

70 Fee levied by government 

.DOWN 

1 Repetitious 

2 Position upon 

3 Saturated 

4 Color 

5 Egyptian sun god 

6 Officeholders 

7 Good 

8 Device that responds to sound 

9 Wire receiver 

10 Man's nickname 

11 Father 

16 Part of Bible (abbr ) 

18 Consume 

20 Direction (abbr ) 



22 Wilhout purpose 

25 Iron __ 

27 Snake 

29 Time 2one (abbr) 

31 Black bird 

33 Hail 

35 Fabric from camel hairs 

36 Authoritative command 

38 Place to stop enroute (abbr ) 

39 Conclude 
42 Beast 

45 Oath (var ) 

47 Priest's garmenl 

49 Eskimo canoe 

51 Take it easy 

52 Town in Oklahoma 
54 Goof off 

56 Investigator (abbr ) 

58 Plead 

59 Indicates mountain 
61 Time zone (abbr.) 

65 Someone who performs (suf.) 
67 Laughter sound 



March 19, 2003 



The Echo 7 



Arts 

Pulitzer Prize winner Henry 
Brant gives lecture on music 



By Cameron Brown 

Staff writer 



Henry Brant, has created a form of 
music that captivates the minds and hearts 
of its listeners with a unique combination 
of instruments that are played in all four 
comers of a concert hall. 

Spatial music, as described by Brant, 
is a specific sound that takes much time 
and concentration to write and conduct. 
Brant's lecture, which was held Wednes- 
day, April 11, in the Samuelson Chapel, 
gave listeners an interesting insight into 
this musicians mind. 

"I wanted to hear the philosophy that 
goes into Brant's music, so that 1 can better 
understand how he creates such musical 
variations of pitch and sound," freshman 
music major, Brett Leonard said. 



In 2002, Brant received the Pulitzer 
Prize for his musical piece called, "Ice 
Field," which, according to Brandt, was 
one of the most "frustrating," pieces that 
he has ever had to construct. 

As Brant continued his lecture, he 
mentioned the four dimensions of music 
that are imperative to the music's success 
and overall flow of notes. 

"In music, one needs to understand 
time measurement, pitch — there would 
be no sound without pitch, tone quality- 
not tone color-and the location of where 
the music instruments are played," Brant 
said. "Although they do sound somewhat 
ambiguous in definition, each composer/ 
writer will be able to define them once 
they have acquired the experience." 

This advice comes with much practice 
and experience behind it; Brant has com- 



posed 112 spatial pieces. 

Other spectators, like senior Bill 
Kroeze, came to the lecture because of the 
uniqueness that Brant offers in his music. 

"I am very involved with music on 
campus and thought that it would be 
nice to see such a wonderful composer," 
Kroeze said. "I figured it would be fun to 
see what he has to say about such music 
styles and techniques." 

Later in the lecture, listeners had the 
opportunity to get a taste of Brant's style 
as, "Ice Field," was heard over the chapel's 
stereo system. Both community members 
and students seemed to be impressed with 
what they were hearing. 

"This type of music really is filled 
with power and gives me greater insight 
into the musical head of Brant," Leonard 
said. 



Brant's work showcased in 



Another who was impressed with 
Brandt's abilities to conduct and orches- 
trate was junior and music major. Holly- 
Anne Halweg. 

"Since I am co-conducting with Brant 
tonight, I feel honored to be a part of his 
musical talent," Halweg said. "This truly 
is a great thrill to have the opportunity to 
conduct with him." 

Brant, throughout the lecture, reflect- 
ed on how music and life are very much 
alike. He said that life is never easy and it 
always seems complicated; the same goes 
for music. Music is complicated and, even 
more so, confusing. 

"So much about you can be learned 
from music," Brant said. "Each is in 
correlation with one another and that is 
where 1 have gotten the most out of my 
life — music." 

Interactive 
Multimedia 



CLU's festival of new music £ffg, Festival 



By Christian Coleman 
Staff writer 



Architectural Boundaries, a Festival 
of New Music sponsored by CLU's de- 
partment of music showcased the work 
of CLU's women's chorale and certain 
CLU soloists, but most notably the 
work of Henry Brant, the foremost liv- 
ing composer of acoustic spatial music. 
Since 1950, Brant, now 88, has led the 
development of a spatial understanding 
of music by crafting over 100 works in 
which the widely-separated positioning 
of performers, on-stage and throughout 
the hall, both horizontally and vertically, 
is central to the composing process. His 
most recently completed works "Ice 
Field," for large orchestral groups, com- 
missioned by Other Minds for the San 
Francisco symphony, which premiered 
in December 2001, and "Ghosts & Gar- 
goyles," a concerto for flute soloist with 
a flute orchestra, composed for New 
Music Concerts of Toronto with a May 
2002 premiere date. He has also worked 
with "Glossary," a vocal solo with 13 
instrumentalists. "Prophets," for four 
cantors and a shofar player and "Crystal 
Antiphonies," for the Swarovski Wind 
Ensemble and the Vienna Radio Orches- 
tra which premiered in 2000. 

Currently, Brant is completing 
"Textures & Timbres," his textbook on 
orchestration. The concert was presented 
to CLU students, faculty and family 
members on Friday. April 11, in the Sam- 



uelson Chapel. The concert consisted 
of five musical scores; "Fanfare For St. 
Edmundsbury," by composer Benjamin 
Britten, "Lucretius" (Scene 4 from The 
Grand Universal Circus) and "Antiphony 
I," both pieces composed by Brant him- 
self, "Golden Windows" composed by 
Mark Spraggins, a member of CLU's 
music faculty where he teaches compo- 
sition, music theory and digital music, 
and "Four Pieces for Clarinet and Piano 
(Opus 5)" by composer Alban Berg. 

"Fanfare for St. Edmunsbury" was 
written in 1959 for the Pageant of Magna 
Carta held in the grounds of Bury St. 
Edmunds Cathedral, England. It is in the 
form of three separate trumpet fanfares, 
which combine in conclusion. The solo 
fanfares play rather freely, but when they 
come together, they are in strict time. The 
trumpeters should be placed as far apart 
as possible, even when the "Fanfare" is 
played indoors. "Four Pieces for Clarinet 
and Piano, (Opus 5)" represents Berg's 
first venture into the musical world 
without the direct supervision of his 
teacher, mentor and father figure, Arnold 
Schoenberg, the great Viennese teacher 
and composer. "The Four Pieces" are 
brief, but they show a young composer in 
full command of what made Berg a 20th 
century master. "Lucretius" is a complete 
scene from Brant's eight-scene, (plot- 
less) spatial opera, "The Grand Universal 
Circus," created in 1956. This scene is 
based on "De Rerum Natura*," a long 
poetic, philosophic and scientific con- 



templation of the natural world by Titus 
Lucretius (C. 99 to C. 55 B.C.). "Golden 
Windows," explores the relationship be- 
tween architecture and music in multiple 
ways. The work heavily utilizes the Fi- 
bonacci series of numbers. The relation- 
ship of consecutive Fibonacci numbers 
reflects the "Golden Proportion" (o.618: 
1) that is found in much architecture, 
dating back to classical structures such 
as the Parthenon in Athens. Finally, "An- 
tiphony I," premiered in 1953, was the 
first of Brant's 1 12 spatial works, each of 
which calls for a different instrumenta- 
tion and a different spatial arrangement 
of the performing forces in the hall. This 
piece requires six independent groups, 
separated from each other, each with its 
own conductor. 

Brant's works are concerned with the 
complexities of everyday reality. 

"It has never seemed to me that life 
is a simple matter, and I have always felt 
that music can reflect everyday existence 
with its many complicated events, both 
internal and external. A mundane episode 
in everyday life is not a one-dimensional 
event. People pass one another unaware 
of each other's needs and fears. For me, 
spatial amalgams of highly contrasted 
musical events, freely associated yet 
controlled, present opportunities for 
representing in the concert hall, musical 
equivalents of the incessant bombard- 
ment of social and environmental catas- 
trophes, which bedevil daily existence," 
Brant said. 



By Trevor Kelley 
State Writer 



Have a great 
Easter break! 




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Tardiness may have been on the rise 
this week, especially if any of your class- 
es were in the Humanities building. 

After all, it was in the Humanities 
Building's lobby, more specifically in 
the Kwan Fong Art gallery, that students 
could be seen standing around at almost 
all hours ogling the various exhibits that 
were on hand. What they were staring at, 
collectively speaking, was CLU's second 
annual Interactive Multimedia Arts Fes- 
tival. For the festival's weeklong stay in 
the Kwan Fong gallery, various exhibits 
had a new home and a captive new au- 
dience. Most exhibits ranged from one 
major installation project to multiple sets 
of art. Students were also treated to an in- 
teractive kiosk machine and a visual trip- 
tych made of various film footage, which 
were presented alongside the festival's 
more traditional displays. 

Of particular interest to students 
seemed to be a film by Katherine Bryan 
and Joe Van Daulesen, which ran on 
the Kwan Fong's west wall. The story 
followed a couple from an argument to 
the supermarket, to fall outs and resolve, 
ultimately working between the suitably 
bizarre confines of a work that could 
qualify on merrits that were both humor- 
ous and artistic. 

Though Bryan and Van Daulesen's 
film was one of the most popular attrac- 
tions, it seemed the more conventional 
work was truly indicative of the festi- 
val's spirit. Perhaps this was best noted 
through the hangings of Jo Gerrard, who 
focused more so on computer assisted 
design. Beautifully and precisely crafted, 
her art truly stole the show, with a four- 
dimensional composition anchoring her 
impressive body of work 

But one thing many students seemed 
to be asking themselves, as did this re- 
viewer, was where exactly did all of this 
great art come from? Who knew that 
there was such untapped talent on our 
campus? What's stopping such talent 
from making it out in the "real world." 

It's a question that, if these exhibits 
are any indication, shouldn't go unan- 
swered for long. 



8 The Echo 



Opinion 



April 16,2003 



o 



fc 



o 



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Respond 



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on the following dates: 

April 23, 2003 

May 14, 2003 



Letter to the Editor 



Dear Editor: 

Considering that FOX, CNN, ABC, 
NBC, Clear Channel radio stations and 
many other important media figures are 
controlled by the government (see for 
example the declarations of the CNN di- 
rector on September ll), I would like to 
contribute to the news in the Echo with the 
translation of a letter sent to G. W. Bush by 
Adolfo Perez Esquivel. Thank you. 

Jorge Garcia 

Professor in the Math. Dept. 

Adolfo Perez Esquivel [1 980 Nobel Peace 

Prize Laureate] 

Letter to Bush: Stop the Killing 

Mr. President of the United States of 

North America 

George W Bush: 

I do not know if you will read this 
letter, not because it will not reach you, 
but because you are unable to read, 
because your heart is hardened by hate 
and scare, you do not have the capac- 
ity or courage to open your mind and 
spirit to compassion. Nevertheless, I 
cannot stop sending it to you, because 
if you do not read it. I am sure that 
many men and women will do, those 
who ask you to stop the killing against 
Iraqi people. 

When you decided to invade Iraq, 
despite the opposition of all the people 
of the world, you did not hear their 
clamor of: "No to the war, yes to the 
peace. " You closed your ears and heart 
when the United Nations, the churches, 
the humanitarian organizations and 
human rights, reclaimed that the state 
of right and respect of the people must 
reign. You were not able to listen. 

I expressed myself in another letter 
to you not to defy God, not to build a 
Babel tower of no-mercy and hate, not 
to let ambition and power to dominate 
you to impose your political, economi- 
cal and military interests. I asked you 
to reconsider because whatever you 
plant, you'll harvest. Unfortunately 
you take life for granted and caused 
profound damage to humanity and 
your own people. 

You will win battles with your im- 
perial army and the ones of your allies: 
you will be able to demonstrate the 



power of arms and the high technology 
of death: but nothing of this will justify 
you. The greatest of your defeats is that 
you lost the respect of all the peoples 
of the world, and you gained the rejec- 
tion in the conscience of the humanity, 
for all the committed crimes. From this 
moment on, your allies of death will 
be your only companions: Tony Blair, 
Jose Maria Aznar and John Howard. 

You hide the real motives of the 
invasion to Iraq and want to justify 
the killings to obtain the power of the 
Iraqi oil resources and dominate the 
Middle East to impose your plans of 
world hegemony and the globalized 
dictatorship. You have transformed the 
United States of America to a terrorist 
state. Did you need to murder the Iraqi 
people, kill children and women, to re- 
move a dictator that was your ally'? 

It is necessary to remember, to live 
in the past, the present should light us. 
The long story of invasions confirms 
this: Vietnam, Cambodia, Yugoslavia, 
Nicaragua, El Salvador, Santo Do- 
mingo. Haiti, Cuba and other military 
dictatorships that the United States im- 
posed: the current militarization and 
the military bases in all Latin America, 
and in other parts of the world. You 
may dominate militarily, but you can 
never convince. 

People do not stand lies by the dis- 
information and campaigns of lies that 
the media use as sociological actions, 
showing the North American and Brit- 
ish soldiers in charitable acts giving 
'caramels away to Iraqi children after 
killing their families and bombing the 
population. How will you justify your 
crimes that you call collateral dam- 
ages? How will you explain to the 
world that you want to destroy the 
United Nations and do not recognize 
the international right to apply your 
domination politics without taking in 
account human costs and the destruc- 
tion of other countries applying the 
terrorism of state? 

How do you justify the unjustifi- 
able? Can you sleep without our con- 
sciousness punishing you? Your army 
bombs with thousands of missiles, cit- 
ies and civil populations, throws clus- 
ter bombs of yellow color and yellow 
food packages to the people: aberrant 
methods applied in Vietnam, Cambodia 



and the Gulf war. Bombs and food are 
your "medicines of death." Your gen- 
erals say they do not count deaths, but 
they count bombs that produce them. 

The perversion does not have lim- 
its, but you say you pray to God and 
believe you are predestined to all hu- 
manity. Hitler thought the same when 
his madness exploded and he wanted 
to dominate the world. The God of this 
life will ask you to pay for your crimes. 
You are responsible for crimes against 
humanity and you will be judged for 
many deaths and pain against the Iraqi 
people and others. 

The world watches, horrified, that 
you give what you do not owe, that the 
vulture that surrounds you is ready 
to move on the rests and blood of the 
Iraqi people, to make business with the 
oil. They talk about the reconstruction 
of Iraq, colonized and submitted to the 
interests of the United Stales, and they 
ask how much they will make. 

You speak of God and reject him. 
You speak of freedom and destroy it. 
You speak of democracy and dignity 
and do not vacillate when scarifying 
in the altar of god Molok, your god 
of destruction and death. You speak of 
human rights when you violate them 
systematically. 

The United Nations Organization 
is an obstacle for your interests. Either 
they put themselves under your will or 
you destroy them. You pretend to build 
a court to judge your ex-allied, Sadam 
Hussein, because it is not significant 
anymore, but you ignore the Interna- 
tional Penal Court to judge crimes 
against humanity. 

You want to reach impunity of your 
soldiers and the one from yourself. Do 
not defy God and the people of the 
world. The empires fall, no matter how 
powerful they are. 

You could plant the peace seed and 
solidarity, but you did not do it. You 
could generate programs of life and 
development of the people, but you did 
not do it. You chose the worst road. 
Who will be your next victims? 

I cannot give you my salutation 
of peace and right, because you do 
not believe in peace and you do not 
practice at right. I request you for re- 
pentance from your crimes and repair 
the wrong that you do. 



The 



Echo Staff 



Michele Hatler 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/ 

Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 

Business Manager 

Brett Rowland 

News Editor 

Karen Peterson 
Arts & Features Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Opinon Editor 



Katie Bashaw 
Sports Editor 

Scott Gasperino 
Photo Editor 

Eric Ingemunson 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Heather Molloy 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Editorial Matter: The staff of The Echo welcomes comments 
on its articles as well as on the newspaper itself. However, the 
staff acknowledges that opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, 
-editorials, letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



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Echo arc inserted by commercial activities or ventures idenu- 
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or investigation of such commercial enterprises or ventures 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
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Inquiries. Inquiries about this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief. The Echo, California Lutheran Univer- 
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Telephone: (805) 493-3465. Fan: (805) 493-3327; E-mail 
echo®c1unet-cdu. 



April 16,2003 



Opinion 



The Echo 9 



Letters to the Editor 



Dear Echo: 



While I appreciate all the opinions the Echo staff 
has in regards to the war in Iraq, I do not appreciate the 
bias The Echo has represented. I realize that what people 
write cannot be controlled, but I feel very slighted that the 
weekly editorial writers and the editor-in-chief have both 
strongly supported only one side. They have even gone as 
far as to insult those that are not in agreement. I, for one, 
am anti-war. I know I am greatly outnumbered on this 
campus in those views (which saddens me at a Christian 
school), but I stand firm. I do strongly feel that the troops 
should be supported; I have a friend fighting in Iraq, so I 
struggle with missing him. 

Although I support the troops, 1 do not agree that war 



or fighting is ever the answer, especially not in this situ- 
ation. My main concern lies in the treatment and misun- 
derstanding of those that are against the war. While some 
protesters go too far, it is within our rights as citizens of 
this country to object to the decisions of our leaders. I feel 
that it is often the media and especially the law enforce- 
ment of this country that have taken the position of the 
war protester too far. Very few protesters today are violent, 
mean or disruptive in their pleas to the government. How- 
ever, since the government employs the law enforcement, 
I can see where they may feel an obligation to uphold the 
actions of those they receive their paychecks from. Of 
course, none of this can be said for sure; this is all just 
speculation. 

However, the reason you never hear of all those peo- 



ple supporting the war is because it isn't "newsworthy" 
or a "big deal" — that is what is expected of Americans. 
While it's a nice dream to be united, it's unrealistic. If we 
are fighting for freedom like all the supporters of war said, 
shouldn't we be practicing those freedoms here at home? 
Please, support or don't support the war, but respect the 
rights of others and let them feel however they would like. 
After all, isn't that really why we're all proud to be Ameri- 
cans? Please email, eajordan@clunet.edu. 

Elissa Jordan 

Psychology 

2004 



Dear Echo: 

After reading your article, I couldn't 
help but pen some of my thoughts. Your 
ideas that the events of September 2001 
promoted unity didn't quite sit right with 
me, unless you mean that people display- 
ing the American flag meant unity. After 
all, the old stars and stripes was a pretty 
popular symbol that autumn, and yet, it 
was such a hollow gesture. I recall, not 
even before the sun had set on September 
1 1th, several people being divided on how 
America as a nation, and themselves as 
individuals, should respond. Some wanted 
to bring politics into it, others thought that 
was disrespectful, but from day one, there 
was a good deal of disagreement. In the 
weeks that followed, a number of rallies 
for "peace and justice" were held in my 
hometown of Merced. Even at these open- 
mic forums, there were hecklers. They 
stood on the fringes of the crowd, sporting 
their American flag sweaters, their children 
(being exploited as you so eloquently 
stated) with red, white and blue painted 
on their faces, shouting uniting slogans 



and singing patriotic songs in an attempt 
to disrupt the event. One or two even did 
the respectful thing and came to the micro- 
phone to speak, and were, in turn, listened 
to and considered. These rallies were often 
cut short when local law enforcement — 
standing by quite noticeably in their riot 
gear — would step in, sometimes on horse- 
back, and force the crowd to disperse from 
a perfectly legal gathering, threatening us 
with arrest for trespassing (how someone 
can trespass on public property is still a 
mystery to me). This brings me to the next 
part of your article, Oakland. Again, I'm 
mystified by the logic you employ, blam- 
ing a group of protesters for a policeman's 
actions. From what I understand, several 
of the longshoremen interviewed said it 
was the police, not the protesters, who 
overreacted by employing unwarranted, 
aggressive tactics, such as firing rubber 
bullets into large crowds where unaffiliated 
persons were walking. It wouldn't be the 
first time so-called peacekeepers attacked 
protesters with little or no provocation. But 
who knows? Perhaps the protesters forced 
the police to draw their guns and fire indis- 



criminately, just like Iraq forced Bush to 
declare war. 

Putting all this aside, your blatant de- 
test for peace- loving and liberty-preserv- 
ing Americans is obvious when you refer 
to them as "obnoxious," "violent" and "a 
problem needing to be solved." This, cou- 
pled with the fact that you are the editor-in- 
chief of our school newspaper, leaves me 
concerned, to say the least. But, perhaps 
you're right. To be fair, I haven't felt this 
country has been very unified since the last 
presidential appointment, and I can't tell 
if it's getting better or worse. Maybe we 
really should be trying harder to unify our 
country; maybe we should put down our 
signs, stop questioning our leaders and just 
watch Fox News, taking time to occasion- 
ally nod. Maybe we should stop imagining 
that we, as a nation, could do better and 
start thinking up catchy, patriotic slogans 
to help bring us all together. In due time, 
phrases such as "God Bless America" 
and "United We Stand" could give way to 
much more heartfelt and affirming state- 
ments like "Hail Victory" or keeping in 
line with our brisk internet lifestyles, we 



could shorten that to just "Hail." But wait, 
let's think about this. Could it be that such 
nationalistic chauvinism going unchecked 
is actually a bad thing? Could history teach 
us that when the opinions of dissenters are 
stifled in favor of what the government 
mandates while using patriotism to cover 
tt up can lead to dictatorial rule, plans 
for world domination and perhaps war or 
genocide (or both) to achieve it? Could the 
people protesting this war now have real- 
ized this and are speaking out for a truly 
good cause?.Despite what you might think, 
it may behoove you to realize that not all 
of these sign-slinging protesters are power 
hungry narcissists who dream of nothing 
but getting their name in the spotlight and 
weakening our country in the process. 
Most of them are protesting to protect the 
ideals and liberties America was founded 
on. Some might even be considered patri- 
ots. 

Sam Vieira 
Drama Tech. 
2004 



Dear Echo: 

"Fair and balanced, as always?" 

If you recognize that slogan, the slo- 
gan of Fox News, this article is for you. 
Fox News is a program that many of my 
classmates watch and often quote. The 
portion of Fox News that I regularly find 
the most inaccurate, conservatively biased 
and distorted is called "The O'Reilly Fac- 
tor." Oddly, O'Reilly is a hero to many. As 
posted on Fox's website, "When ydli do a 
program as controversial as The [O'Reilly] 
Factor it's good to be right" (3/15/03). I'd 
have to agree with Fox — let's look at a few 
of O'Reilly's figures. 

During an interview with Kjm Gandy, 
the National Organization for Women 
president ("O'Reilly Factor", 2/5/02), 
O'Reilly claimed, "58 percent of single- 
mom homes are on welfare." When this 
figure was questioned, O'Reilly held firm: 
"You can't say no. Miss Gandy. That's 
the stat. You can't just dismiss it. It's 58 
percent. That's what it is from the federal 
government." 

But by the next broadcast (2/6/02), 
O'Reilly was revising his figures, "at this 
point, we have this from Washington, and 



it's bad. Fifty- two percent of families re- 
ceiving public assistance are headed by a 
single mother, 52 percent." Not only is this 
a different number, it's not the percentage 
of households headed by single mothers 
that receive welfare, but the percentage of 
families receiving public assistance headed 
by single mothers. 

The following night (2/7/02), O'Reilly 
came up with more solid figures, but they 
bore no resemblance to his original num- 
bers: about 14 percent of single mothers 
receive federal welfare benefits, he now 
said — less than one-fourth of his ear- 
lier claim (He suggested that food stamps 
should to be considered a form of welfare, 
but that only gets him to 33 percent — still 
25 percentage points short). O'Reilly ex- 
plained, "it's really hard to get a stat to say 
how many single moms percentage-wise 
get government assistance." 

I'd disagree with Mr. O'Reilly; he 
wasn't able to create three different sets of 
statistics — he just had to make up or bend 
a few of them. 

When Green Peace's John Pas- 
sacantando asserted that drilling in the 
Arctic National Wildlife Refuge would 
only yield six to nine months of oil (5/1/ 
01), O'Reilly was not impressed. "That's 



your opinion!" he retorted. The numbers 
that Passacantando referred to came from 
United Stales Energy Information Ad- 
ministration who say it will take almost a 
decade of preparation and actual drilling to 
bring the refuge oil field on line. Even then, 
its oil would barely reduce the net share of 
foreign oil used by American consumers 
from 62 percent to 60 percent. These gains 
would not be realized until the year 2020. 
The United States Geological Survey es- 
timates that the amount of oil that could 
profitably be extracted from ANWR is 
about the same amount the nation uses in 
six to nine months. 

While O'Reilly doesn't have any prob- 
lem attacking other people's "opinions" he 
certainly has no problem interjecting his 
own opinion on his show: "I don't under- 
stand why in the year 2000, with all of the 
media that we have, that a certain segment 
of the African-American community does 
not understand that they must aggressively 
pursue their child's welfare. That is they 
have to stop drinking, they have to stop 
taking drugs and boozing, and — and whites 
do it, too! Whites do it, too!" ("O'Reilly 
Factor", 1/17/00). 

Let's take a look at one of the titles 
of O'Reilly's shows. "Coming next, drug- 



addicted pregnant women no longer have 
anything to fear from the authorities thanks 
to the Supreme Court. Both sides of this in 
a moment," ("O'Reilly Factor", 3/23/01). 
Does anyone really believe that O'Reilly is 
going to present the news in a way which 
allows the view to decide — or has O'Reilly 
already labeled what he is going to report 
on as a blunder by the Supreme Court? 

O'Reilly tries to act like a person who 
is trying to get to the bottom of an issue 
without bringing in his political bias. He 
portrays himself as a straight-talking, 
straight- shooting, tell- it- like- it- is in- 
terviewer. Yet, he doesn't properly correct 
himself when he blunders or misrepresents 
his statistics. O'Reilly is just trying to pro- 
mote his conservative agenda. Don't watch 
O'Reilly, don't believe what O'Reilly says, 
and don't watch Fox News. Any news sta- 
tion which would continually endorse such 
a dubious joumalist/talk- show host is sure 
to be garbage. I suggest getting news from 
a more reliable source such as NPR or the 
BBC, groups which are non-profit and 
news- based. 

Joshua Kramer 

Economics 

2004 



Want to work for the Echo next year? 
Call 493-3465 



10 The Echo 



Sports 



April 16, 2003 



Regals softball sweeps 
Sagehens; grabs top finish 



By John Botta 
Staff writer 



The Regals softball team assured 
itself of a SCI AC title by sweeping the Po- 
mona-Pitzer Sagehens this weekend with a 
combined score of 23-5. This is their first 
championship since 1998. 

Cal Lutheran softball won last Friday, 
7-2, over Pomona-Pitzer. 

The win holds the Regals at the top of 
the conference with a 12-4 record in league 
play. 

Cal Lutheran got off to a quick start, 
coming out of the first inning with a 4-1 
lead. The Regals then added three more 
runs in the fifth to close the deal. 

Chelsea Barrella went 3-4 with an RBI 
while Christa Galier '.vent 2-3 with three 
RBls. Erin Neuhaus kept Pomona in check 
at the plate, picking up the win for Cal Lu. 

The team finished its season with a 
bang last Saturday, defeating Pomona- 
Pitzer in both games of a double header 8- 
1 and 8-2. The wins guarantee the Regals 
with at least a share of the SCIAC title. 

In the first game, CLU led 4-0 after 
four innings. Heidi Miller nailed her sec- 
ond home run of the season in the fourth, 
accounting for two of her five RBIs. The 



Regals then scored an- 
other four runs in the 
fifth to put the game 
out of reach. 

Gianna Regal 
picked up the win for 
Cal Lutheran, strik- 
ing out six Pomona 
batters. 

The Regals led the 
second game 3-0 until 
the Sagehens scored in 
the fourth. 

The Regals re- 
sponded with five 
runs in the bottom of 
the fourth as Monica 
Schallert knocked in 
three of the five runs 
with a triple to center 
field. 

"Our progress 
this season is a tribute 
to how hard we've 
worked," manager 
Debbie Day said after 
the game. "We've had 
some ups and downs 
but we've still accom- 
plished our goals." 




photograph by Laura Kodgers 

Senior Erin Neuhaus got the win on the mound for the Regals 
on Friday night at Pomona-Pitzer. 



Holland and Hollinger 
lead Kingsmen in Texas 



By Luke Patten 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran golf team 
went to Texas last week and took part in 
the Mary Hardin-Baylor Invite where it 
placed tenth out of 12 teams. 

Traveling to Texas meant that the 
Kingsmen were forced to play on a course 
that was different from the ones they're 
used to. Freshman Peder Nyhus said that 
the course was fair but was a new experi- 
ence for the team. 

"It was in okay shape. It was pretty 
narrow and there was definitely trouble out 



there in the desert, but it was pretty decent. 
It was just different from what we're used 
to playing," said Nyhus. 

The Kingsmen shot rounds of 309, 
320, and 309 to finish with a total of 938. 
Hardin-Simmmons won the event with a 
score of 905 (292-303-3 10). SCIAC mem- 
ber Redlands shot a 911 (299-308-304) to 
finish in third place. 

The 320 score in the second round 
was what ultimately did in the Kingsmen 
during this tournament. Nyhus, who was 
suffering from the fiu, said that the team 
has had trouble with those kind of situa- 
tions this year. 



"It was a long day," said Nyhus. 
"We've kinda struggled with having to 
play 18 this year. I guess it's just been a 
rough year." 

Senior Mart Holland (75-80-87) and 
freshman Adam Hollinger (74-77-81) who 
each finished with a three round total of 
232 led the Kingsmen. They finished tied 
for 22nd overall. 

The rest of the CLU team consisted 
of junior Jordan Silvertrust, Nyhus, and 
freshman Austin Aker. Silvertrust shot 240 
(76-84-80), Nyhus finished at 242 (87-79- 
76), and Aker scored a 246 (84-86-76). 



WANTED 

SPORTS EDITOR 

must be available to train this semester, start Fall 2003 

-COMM 23 1 required- 
-previous experience on the Echo preferred- 



rime commitment: 

Sunday afternoons 

all day Monday 

(flexible with class schedule) 



stipend given at the 

conclusion of each semester 

worked 



please contact Katie for more 

information or to indicate interest 

klbashaw@clunet.edu 

(805) 493-9169 



this week's 

Kingsmen & 

Regals action 



Today, April 16 

-baseball v. Point Loma 
3p.m. -North Field 

Thursday, April 17 

-baseball v. Westmont 
3p.m. -North Field 



Friday, April 18 

-w tennis - SCIAC 

Championships 

CLU tennis courts 

-m tennis at SCIAC 

Championships 

-track at Pomona-Pitzer 

Invitational 



Saturday, April 19 

-w tennis - SCIAC 
Championships 
CLU tennis courts 
-m tennis at SCIAC 
Championships 



Monday, April 21 

-golf at SCIAC 
Tournament #1 



Thursday, April 24 

-w tennis at Ojai Invite 
-m tennis at Ojai Invite 
-golf at SCIAC 
Tournament #2 



Friday, April 25 

-w tennis at Ojai Invite 
-m tennis at Ojai Invite 
-baseball at La Verne 



Saturday, April 26 

-w tennis at Ojai Invite 
-m tennis at Ojai Invite 
-track at SCIAC Prelims 
-baseball v. La Verne 
11 a.m. & 2 p.m. 



Sunday, April 27 

-w tennis at Ojai Invite 
-m tennis at Ojai Invite 



April 16, 2003 



Sports 



The Echo 11 



Baseball stays on top; sweeps Stags 



By Sean-Micheal Porter 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran baseball team 
stays on top of the SCIAC with a three- 
game sweep of Claremont this weekend 
winning 11-6 Friday, April 11, in Clare- 
mont and winning 7-1 and 16-2 Saturday, 
April 12. at North Field. 

This weekend's standout, senior Jeff 
Meyers, broke the CLU career home run 
record. His 26 homers tops the former 
record of 25, held by Mark Sutton, who 
played from 1979-82. Meyers tied the re- 
cord with a solo shot in the eighth inning 
of the first game Saturday and then broke it 
with a two-run bomb in the sixth inning of 
game two. Meyers concluded the impres- 



sive afternoon going 5-for-6 with four RBI 
and four runs scored. 

"Jeff Meyers had an outstanding week- 
end," said senior Luke Stajcar. "We are all 
proud of him for breaking the record." 

In game two of the double header Sat- 
urday, the Kingsmen hit five home runs, 
including the season's first back-to-back- 
to-back home run performance by seniors 
Jason Claros, Brian Skaug, and JR. Cortez 
in the fourth inning. 

Josh Benson picked up his third win 
of the season striking out four and walking 
none in five innings of play. Relief help is 
what sealed the deal in game two as fresh- 
man Matt Hirsh, senior Justin Thomas, 
and junior Ryan Ayers combined for four 
scoreless innings. In game one of the dou- 



Tennis teams topple 
Pomona-Pitzer 



By Victor Esquer 
Staff Writer 



The CLU men's and women's tennis 
teams continued their dominating ways 
by defeating Pomona with ease in SCIAC 
play. 

The men were too tough for Pomona in 
a 5-2 victory. This win moved the Kings- 
men to 6-1 in SCIAC. Amir Marandy 
once again was unable to be stopped as he 
pushed his undefeated streak to 16-0, with 
a 5-7, 6-2, 6-3 win over David Frankel in 
No. I singles. 

Other Kingsmen that picked up 
wins in their singles matches were Junya 
Hasebe. Quinn Calderon and Karlo Arapo- 
vic. Hasebe topped Jamie Frank 6-4, 4-6, 
6-3. Calderon had no trouble with J.B. 
Wogan 6-3, 6-4, and Arapovic defeated 
Sam Gaines 6-4, 6-4. 

In the doubles matches, the team of 
Marandy and Jeremy Quinlan were sur- 
prisingly beaten by Frankel and J.R. Hall, 
8-3. 

Arif Hasan and Quoc Ly were able to 
bounce back and defeated Samir Vora and 
Nate Pealer 8-5 in No. 2 doubles. Calderon 
and Sean Ruitenberg won their match eas- 
ily, 8-1. Senior Ruitenberg says his team 
is ready for the up - and - coming SCIAC 
championships. 

"Pomona tested us a little bit, but we 
were able to stay poised and come out with 
a huge win. This is only preparing us for 
the championships and I feel were just 
about there," said Ruitenberg. 

The Regals continued their winning 
streak by defeating Southwestern, 8-1. 
Southwestern was only able to win one 
singles match. In SCIAC action, the Re- 
gals were too much for Pomona- Pitzer as 
they came out victorious with a 6-3 win. 
This win put the Regals in sole possession 



of first place in conference. They are now 
14-2 overall and 7-0 in SCIAC. 

Becca Hunau and Lisa Novajosky 
defeated Kelli Howard and Whitney Hen- 
derson, 8-4 in No. 1 doubles. Hunau also 
defeated Henderson 6-4, 7-6 (2) in the No. 
2 singles. Aimee Fiore, Jessica Thompson 
and Stephanie Perkins were able to pick it 
up for the Regals as they won their respec- 
tive singles matches. 

The doubles tandem of Hunau and No- 
vajosky had no problem with Howard and 
Henderson in a 8-4 victory. 

"We just keep finding a way to win, 
when one of us isn't on, there is always 
someone there to pick it up. That's what 
great teams do. I've never played with a 
better group of girls. We can definitely do 
some damage in the championships," said 
Novajosky. 



. <4«UUL-! 



* 



m 




photograph by Marcus Reinkc 
Jessica Thompson senses dicing her victo- 
rious match against Pomona-Pitzer. 



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ble header, senior Ryan Melvin improved 
to 5-1 as he struck out six batters in seven 
innings. Cortez and junior Ed Edsall each 
had two hits. 

"Overall, our pitching staff threw well 
this weekend," senior Taylor Slimak said. 

It was certainly evident in Friday's 
game as junior Jason Hirsh pitched a 
complete game, striking out ten batters 
and improved to a team best seven wins 
on the year. 

"I got stronger as the game went on," 
said Hirsh. 

CLU jumped on Claremont early as 
Slimak hammered a three-run home run 
in the first inning. The Kingsmen scored at 
least one run in each of the first six innings. 
Claros was solid going 3-for-4 with three 



RBI and two runs scored. Senior Ryan 
Cooney had two hits with three RBI and 
one run scored and Cortez hit his eighth 
home run of the year in the sixth inning. 
CLU played well under pressure as nine of 
CLU's runs were scored with two outs. 

"Everybody hit well this weekend," 
said Hirsh. 

"This was a huge series we needed to 
win," Stajcar said. 

"We played big this weekend," Slimak 
said. "We dominated in all areas of the 
game." 

The league leading Kingsmen im- 
proved to 22-10 overall and 13-2 in 
SCIAC. 

CLU hosts Point Loma Nazarene in a 
non-conference game Apr 16. 



Track and Field v. 

Whittier, Occidental 

and Pomona-Pitzer 

April 5 at Occidental 



Regals 124, Whittier 55 
Regals 95, Occidental 103 
Regals 87, Pomona-Pitzer 113 

The Regals finished the season 2-5. 

*Dereem McKinney participated in 
all three jumping events as well as the 
discus, shot and hammer throws for the 
Regals! 

•Denise French placed first in the 
400m and second in the triple jump. 

•Leah Bingham was second in the 
100m hurdles with 17.31. 

*Jacquie Ramierez ran the 200m in 
27.54 and the 100m in 13.34 for second 
place in each race. 

*Carly Sandell and Heather Worden 
both PRed in the 1500m, Sandell by six 
seconds for 5:04.37 and Worden by eight 
seconds for 4:56.34. Worden placed sec- 
ond in the event. 



Kingsmen 93, Whittier 99 
Kingsmen 74, Occidental 113 
Kingsmen 77, Pomona-Pitzer 119 

The Kingsmen are 0-6-1 at the con- 
clusion of the season. 

*Marcus Green was second in the 
100m dash, finishing in 1 1 .6 1 . 

'Grant Kincade placed first in the 
100m hurdles. 

*Jon Siebrecht acheived personal 
records in the 200m race, triple jump and 
pole vault. 

The Kingsmen and Regals will travel 
to Pomona-Pitzer for one last invitation- 
al before the SCIAC Preliminary races 
on April 26. Conference Finals are on 
Monday. April 28 at La Verne. 



TI7 



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Paris $363 

Amsterdam. ..$376 
Rome $425 



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12 The Echo 



Sports 



April 16, 2003 



Huge strides made in Now Is The 
Time campaign for North Campus 



By Alex Espinoza 
Staff Writer 



University President Luther Luedtke 
declared that California Lutheran Uni- 
versity's Now is the Time campaign had 
surpassed the $62 million mark, pulling it 
to within $18 million of reaching its goal of 
$80 million. The announcement was made 
on March 13, at the CLU Circle of Friends 
Dinner in Beverly Hills. 

"This campaign serves a profound 
statement that we are committed to making 
a major step forward in the development of 
CLU," said Luedtke. "Our vision for CLU 
puts it in an entirely new category in terms 
of maturation and the educational experi- 
ence we can offer our students." 

Now that the announcement has been 
made public, CLU can talk more publicly 



about raising money for the campaign that 
will be used for the development of the 
long-awaited North Campus athletics fa- 
cilities. 

Susan McQuilkin, campaign assistant 
director, believes the announcement will 
spark interest on campus and also in the 
community. 

"Gifts have been coming in every 
day since the announcement was made. 
We've received outstanding support from 
our Board of Regents, alumni and current 
students," said McQuilkin. 

So far. the campaign has received 
support from over 13.000 donors. Among 
the many contributors have been the Spies- 
Bornemann families, who gave $3 million, 
the largest gift given to CLU by alumni, for 
the North Campus facilities. 

This money will be used to build state- 



of-the-art classrooms and labs for the Exer- 
cise Science Sports Medicine department, 
new training facilities and fitness centers 
for Intercollegiate and Intramural sports. 
With the completion of the North Campus 
athletic facilities, CLU will be allowed 
to host NCAA tournaments and playoff 
games. The addition of the Olympic-sized 
pool will enable CLU to have competitive 
water sports. These new additions should 
help in the recruitment and retention of 
student-athletes as well. 

"The North Campus facility is going 
to be awesome. It's going to benefit the 
entire community," said McQuilkin. "One 
of the things that has helped our cause has 
been the support we've gotten from current 
students. Their support has inspired alumni 
and foundations to give their support as 
well." 



Heading up the support from CLU stu- 
dents has been Senior Nicole Hackbarth, 
chair of the Student Campaign Commit- 
tee. So far current students have helped 
raise around $5,000 for the campaign. 
Students have contributed by giving small 
donations, sending letters to alumni, giv- 
ing presentations and donating bricks for 
the facilities. 

"It's important that all students, ath- 
letes and non-athletes alike participate 
in this campaign. The completion of the 
North Campus will bring more publicity 
to CLU and that is just going to help all of 
us," said Hackbarth. 

Students can also help out by purchas- 
ing the new CLU sweatshirts that are now 
available in the bookstore. Ten dollars 
from each purchase is being donated to the 
campaign in the name of the purchaser. 



FALL INTRAMURALS 



INTRAMURAL BOWLING 
TOURNAMENT WINNERS 

April 10 

First Place: Ben Geiger 
Second Place: Bob Grantz 

Male high-score: Mike Wertheimer 210 
Female high-Score: Kristie Barazza 182 



Sign up NOW at the SUB 
FRONT desk for the 

Intramural KICK BALL 

TOURNAMENT to take place 
TONIGHT AT 6 P.M. 

(8 - ON - 8 WITH 
TWO FEMALES REQUIRED) 



CALL X3302 WITH QUESTIONS 



ALL SOFTBALL GAMES WERE 
RAINED OUT THIS WEEK ... 



SOFTBALL 
STANDINGS 

Field Stompers 3-0 (48) 

Tools 3-0(41) 

Pink Bunny Rabbits 2-0 (47) 

Soiland 2-0 (41 ) 

Holy Hitters 2-0 (29) 

#1 Stunnaz 2-0 (28) 

Fo Sho Fo Sho 2-0 (22) 

Daryl Strawberry 2-0 (20) 

Dirty South 2-1 (23) 

Bogards 1-1 (20) 

Weekend Warriors 1-1(26) 

Hang Ten 1-1 (20) 

Hot Potatoes 1-1 (17) 

Big Purple Machine 0-2 (9) 

Dogs with Legs 0-2 (5) 
Your Grandpa s Daughter 0-3 (22) 

Coconut Crushers 0-3 (1 0) 

John Morse 0-3 (9) 

Utah Jamz 0-2 (6) 



WATCH FOR A 

. NEW SOFTBALL 

SCHEDULE TO BE 

RELEASED 

INCLUDING 

MAKE-UP GAME 

INFORMATION 

AND NEWS 

ABOUT THE 

IM Softball 
championship 

SERIES 



Basketball 

ALL-STARS 

Chris Hargrave 

Tim Huck 

Kou Fox 

quinn longhurst 

Rob Munguia 

Katie Hunt 

Brian Cochran 

Jules Neale 

Greg Allen 

Jason Collins 

Dean Klipfel 

Jarrod Kopp 

Bryan Daniels 

Brian Roberts 

Mike Wertheimer 

Alfonso Rodriques 

Gabe Solberg 

Per Sandstrom 

Micah Schultz-Akerson 

Alex Espinoza 



BASKETBALL 
STAIlDinGS 

Diuimus Lucus 6-0 

Sloppv Secoiids 5-0 

Chips 6 Salsa 4-1 

Basketball JunniES 4-1 

BoLLfi IHoose 4-2 

Best Coast Ali-Starz 3-2 

BumBLEBEES 3~2 

High Rollers 2-3 

goodfellas 2~3 

IllTeiiipered 1-3 

Gippers 1-3 

Black PAnTHERS 1-4 

FREEflGEnTS 1-4 

TEAm TuF-Swn 1-4 

Beaia TEAm 0-5 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 43, No. 22 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



Sports 

Softball team finishes 

first in SCIAC - waits for 

Regional ranking. 

See story page 7 



April 30, 2003 



Features 

"Company " opens at the Thousand 
Oaks Civic Arts Plaza. 



See story page 5 



News 

Senate passes new bill to improve 
lighting around campus. 



See story page 3 



CLU salutes Earth Day 



By Brandee Tecson 
Staff Writer 

California Lutheran University's 4th 
Annual Earth Day Festival turned Kings- 
men Park into a virtual exotic wonderland 
on Sunday, April 27, 2003. 

Students, parents and children from 
the community were invited to attend the 
event which brought out a various assort- 
ment of live exotic animals, free food, live 
music and an educational environment in 
which people could leam more about the 
world in which they live. 

Free organic apples, fresh popcorn 
and various finger foods were offered to 
the public as they browsed various booths 
set up by environmentally-aware organiza- 
tions such as the Wildlife Care of Ventura 
County, ENSR and Girl Scout Troupe 915. 

"Today, we're giving out information 
about living with wildlife," said Alan Pol- 
lack, a spokesperson for the Wildlife Care 
of Ventura County. 

As a non-profit organization. Pollack 
and his fellow volunteers rely solely on do- 
nations to fund their charity, which rescues 
and rehabilitates birds and small mammals. 
Many times, the money will come out of 
their pockets. 

Pollack, along with the program's ex- 
ecutive director Ana Reams, brought along 
an 8-month-old baby bobcat to showcase 
their cause. 

The bobcat, which sustained a head 
injury while in the wild, was brought to the 
center for rehabilitation and is now ysed in 
educational training. 

"We want people to know that if they 
find a wild injured or orphaned animal, 
call a rehabilitation facility as soon as pos- 
sible," said Reams. "The sooner they're 




Photograph by Brandee Tecson 
Children from the community gape in awe 
at Indie, a 150-pound tortoise. 

treated, the better chance they have of be- 
ing released [back into the wild]." 

Animals For Education and Entertain- 
ment, a non-profit organization in River- 
side, Calif, which promotes animal aware- 
ness, was the biggest crowd pleaser with 
their assortment of wild animals including 
cockatoos, lizards. Indie, a 150-pound tor- 
toise and Bing, an Asian bearcat. 

The leading attraction was Clyde, a 
160-pound Albino python originating from 
Asia, who has appeared as a guest on "The 
Tonight Show" with Jay Leno. At 16 feet 
long, the white and yellow constrictor is 
only halfway to his full size. 

A marine touch tank was set up by the 
biology department and included differ- 
ent kinds of sea stars, sea cucumbers, sea 
anemones, mussels, snails and gastropods. 
Sophomore Jamie Meyer and seniors 
Sandy Ballentine and Jessica Kollmeyer 
managed the booth, which drew a sizeable 
interest from the crowd. 

"We wanted to bring more awareness 




Photograph by Brandee Tecson 
CLU Students hold Clyde, a 16-foot long, 160-pound Albino python from Asia. Clyde 
has appeared on "The Tonight Show" with Jay Leno. 



to the community about environmental 
studies," said Ballentine, who along with 
Kollmeyer has been involved in coordi- 
nating the event since its inception. "We 
wanted to create a fun, learning environ- 
ment." 

To conclude the event, Dr. Pamela 
Brubaker addressed the crowd and re- 
minded the public of the views of Martin 
Luther. 

"If we look at the scripture from the 
Jewish and Christian tradition, it says that 
we are formed from the earth yet made 
from the image of God," Brubaker said. 
"We are called to be stewards and caretak- 
ers of God's good gift of creation." 

Brubaker, who teaches an environ- 
mental ethics course, brought up specific 



ecological issues, such as global warming 
and its hazardous effects on the environ- 
ment. 

"There is so much we can lose," Bru- 
baker said. "Our health and the health of 
the planet are at stake." 

Brubaker then challenged the crowd 
to take up a "conversion of the earth," or 
turning away from a focus of your life that 
has a negative impact on the earth, such 
as over-consumption and excessive water 
use. 

"This is a contribution that I'm mak- 
ing to care for the earth, to making it just 
a little better place to be," Brubaker said. 
"Let's go away from today with a commit- 
ment to do that care and to remember and 
celebrate the beauty of what we have." 



Kidnapping, drugs and business in Columbia 



By Jessica Laufman 
Staff Writer 



California Lutheran University gained 
new prospective of foreign awareness 
when professor Steven Yamshon gave 
insight into the realities of international 
business. His lecture, "Doing Business in 
Columbia," was held Monday. April 14 at 
10 a.m. in Nygreen 1. 

Yamshon teaches at the UCLA An- 
derson Graduate School of Business 
Management and has written many recent 
publications on the economic concerns of 
Latin America. In the past 10 years, he has 
witnessed the current economic condition 
of the Columbian nation in his personal 
business affairs. 

Columbia has been involved in a 60- 
year civil war that recently escalated in 



the 1990s. The fighting has been between 
the government of Columbia and separate 
guerilla factions. 

The guerilla groups are financially 
prosperous because of their business af- 
fairs concerning drugs, illegal arms sales, 
kidnapping and extortion. Illegal drug ex- 
portation generates $1 billion a year, thus 
making the guerilla groups highly influen- 
tial in the Columbian economy. 

Yamshon stated that the United States 
government has taken action against drug 
exportation in Columbia and other Latin 
American countries by eradicating crops. 
Unfortunately, the drug-trading survives 
because it relocates to other countries, 
which happened to Columbia in the 1970s 
and 1980s after crops were eradicated in 
Bolivia. 

"There is a huge demand for drugs; 
someone in the world will supply it," Yam- 



"There is a huge demand 
for drugs; someone in 
the world will supply it." 



Steven Yamshon 
Professor at UCLA 

shon said. 

Besides illegal drugs, Columbia is also 
responsible for exporting bananas, coffee 
and flowers. Many international business 
opportunities have arisen recently as well, 
but due to the kidnapping crisis, traveling 
to Columbia is dangerous. Three thousand 
people were kidnapped in 2002, generat- 
ing $40 million for the guerilla groups 
involved. 



"When traveling in Columbia, it is best 
to keep a low profile by blending in with 
the locals. It is also crucial to speak Span- 
ish because it is the only spoken word the 
further you travel into the country. It also 
helps to have kidnapping insurance be- 
cause the situation isn't going to improve 
any time soon," Yamshon said. 

Jonathan Steepee, a political science 
professor at CLU, thought the lecture was 
one of the best the school has hosted this 
year because it was well organized and 
very informative. 

"Dr. Yamshon went into the dirty de- 
tails and did an excellent job conjuring up 
all sorts of information that is not typically 
discussed about Columbia; he also had per- 
sonal experiences to support what he said 
as well," Steepee said. 



2 The Echo 



Calendar 



April 30, 2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the III 




today 

april 30 



Worship 

Chapel 
10:10 a.m. 

Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Rolaracl Club Meeting 

Overton Hall 
8 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel 
9:11 p.m. 



thursday 

may 1 



Intramural Basketball 
Gym 

8 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 

10 p.m. 



friday 

may 2 



Sunday 

may 4 




Honor's Day 

Honor 's Day Convocation 

Chapel 
10 a.m. 

Honor 's Dinner 

7p.m. 

Drama Production - "Company " 

Civic Arts Plaza 
7:30 p.m. 

Club LU - Survivor/Fear Factor 

Gym 

9 p.m. 



Saturday 

may 3 



Drama Production - "Company" 
Civic Arts Plaza 
7:30 p.m. 



Intramural Softball 

Gibello Field 
8 a.m. 

Drama Production - "Company" 
Civic Arts Plaza 
2 p.m. 

Senior Cap N Gown Party 

Chapel 

4p.m. I irTl r\| 

,S " , \h 
\\J, 
Church j^^ f 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 



ASCLU-G Programs Board Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
6:30 p.m. 

ASCLU-G RHA Meeting 

Nygreen 2 
8:30 p.m. 



Intramural Basketball 

Gym 
8 p.m. 

monday 

may 5 






tuesday 

may 6 



Sister Friends 

Chapel Lounge 
5:15 p.m. 

Asian Club and Friends 

Pederson Lounge 
6 p.m. 

Bible Study 

Chapel Lounge 
8 p.m. 

Psychology Club Meeting 

Apartment Lounge 
8 p.m. 



A SCL U-G Senate Meeting 

Nygreen 2 

5:15 p.m. 



classifieds 



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Services is looking for bright, enthusiastic, 

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email: 

instructorhiriug@acccducation.com 

*Include any standardized lest scores 



Summer Day Camp Help Needed: 

Seeking General Counselors & Specialist 

Insiructors. Located jusl 20 minutes from 

CLU Staff can earn S280O-35OO+ for the 

summer working vv/ children outdoors! 

If interested, call: 

<888)784-CAMPor 

visit: www.workatcamp.com 

Work From Home: Do you have a 
nose for business'* Need money? Work 
from home! We train you. Order our free 
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If interested, call or email: 

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Classified ads can be placed 

on the Calendar page for a flat rate 

regardless of word count. Discount 

available for multiple issue orders. 

Ads are subject to editing for 

content 8c clarity. 

Call: 

(805) 493-3865 



"Your Electronic Award" Solution Speeds and 

Simplifies Process, 

Makes Awards Easy to Understand and Evaluate 

eginmng in April 2003, California Lutheran University is presenting 

financial aid award packages to all students online - speeding the 

notification process and enabling students to finalize financial 

arrangements sooner. 

!ach online award notification is accompanied by additional tools and 

' Web links to help students evaluate their preferred financing methods. 



The Math Lab at 

California Lutheran 

University 

At the Math Lab we offer FREE 

tutoring for all math from 

basic Algebra to Calculus and 

beyond! 

Our location is in the F building 
room 10, in between the 
Ed/Tech building\ and the D 
building. Our hours are always 
Sunday through Thursday from 
7- 10 p.m. 

We have laptops available for 
use. 

The tutors are friendly AND 
cool! 

Please take advantage of our 
services!! 

Come to get tutored, study or 
just hang out! 

Improve your test scores 
NOW!! 

Questions? Contact Dr. Garcia at 
X3276 



Senior Goodbues 



Saggc 



Graduation is right around the corner! 
podbue to uour graduating friends in a special Graduation 



-^ 



ngi 

Th 



of The Echc 



Goodbues are $5.00 for text only and $6.00 for text and one 
photo. Additional photos are extra. 

Reserve space to say goodbye by May 5 tK . 

E-mail uour text and photos to echo@clunet.edu 

(put Senior Goodbye in the subject) 

or drop them off at the Pioneer House 



(Mail Code #*>£50"> 



Questions? Call x536^ 





Speech CoDtest 

fuesefsy, Msy <S, 2003 si 7 p.m 



Four categories to_"speak on." 

Affirmative action, war and peace, 

race relations, or oppressive language. 

Please stop by the Multicultural Programs 

Office to pick up entry form and guidelines. 

For more information call ext. 3323. 



April 30, 2003 



News 



Bill to bring new light 



The Echo 3 



By Brandee Tecson 
Stait Writer 

A resolution to improve lighting on 
campus passed unanimously during Mon- 
day night's Senate meeting, the last of the 
semester. 

Lighting has been a safety issue for 
many students over the years. 

The bill will add lighting to the darker 
spots around campus, as well as improve 
the current lighting system. 

"Inadequate lighting poses a safety 
hazard to all California Lutheran Univer- 
sity students and creates an atmosphere of 
insecurity." wrote senior Christa Hudson, 
who sponsored the bill. "In the event that 
someone wished harm against a CLU 
student, the deficient lighting on campus 
would produce an environment conducive 
to such unlawful behavior." 

Main targets for the renovation include 



Buth Park, Luther Street, Pioneer Street, 
Memorial Parkway, Regent Avenue and 
Faculty Street, which have been known to 
have their lights not operating at their full 
capacity. 

Overhead lights along the streets are 
sparse and fail to provide proper illumina- 
tion for safety. 

This has been a concern for a sig- 
nificant number of CLU students who take 
night classes at the university. 

The resolution states "the ASCLU 
Senate strongly recommends the purchas- 
ing of additional lights for Buth Park, 
Luther Street, Pioneer Street, Memorial 
Parkway and Faculty Street. 

Additionally, we would deeply advo- 
cate the necessity of keeping CLU's cur- 
rent lighting turned on in the basketball 
courts and the streets surrounding the 
campus." 

The bill, which has been in discussion 



since the beginning of the spring semester, 
has been a primary concern for Senate and 
passed with a unanimous vote of 14-0, with 
no abstentions. 

The lighting resolution is among a 
slew of bills that have come to realization 
this semester. 

During the final meeting. Associate 
Dean of Students Michael Fuller and Bill 
Rosser thanked the senators for all of their 
hard work and dedication. 

"You all did a really, really good job 
and we want you to know that you're 
appreciated," Fuller said. "This was an 
extremely strong group and probably the 
most effective Senate I have ever worked 
with." 

Fuller said that this group of senators 
was extremely proactive in taking up stu- 
dents' issues. 

"I think one of their major accomplish- 
ments would have to be the installation of 



the card readers in New West," Fuller said. 
"This has been a project that students in 
this area have been asking to be done for 
years." 

Card readers were finally installed in 
the New West residence halls in February 
2003. 

Senior Natalie Roberts was a key 
member in several key Senate issues this 
semester, including the issuance of funds 
for new diplomas to CLU's graduating 
classes and a resolution for the renovation 
of Kingsmen Park, which was passed in 
early April. 

"It was a privilege to work on this 
year's board because we were a proactive 
group that examined the issues from all an- 
gles and respected each others' opinions," 
said Roberts, a liberal studies major. "I felt 
we accomplished a record number of proj- 
ects, and enjoyed representing the student 
body's concerns." 



Programs Board prepares for Fall 



By Christa Hudson 
Staff Writer 



Programs Board has two remaining 
events: the Lu Down and Free Your Mind. 
The contract for the Lu Down had yet to 
be signed at Programs Board's meeting on 
April 1 3. During this meeting, the board at- 
tempted to finalize all the residual details. 

Jackee Oshman requested $300 of ad- 
ditional funding for the Lu Down. She in- 
tends to buy hay and put it around the me- 
chanical bull. The hay will act as an added 
cushion in case anyone falls off the bull. 

"I'm expecting a call back from Rick 
from Borderline. We have a few small 
things to still work out, like what will be 
served at the appetizer bar," said Osh- 



man. The appetizer bar will be available 
to students for about an hour during the 
Lu Down program. California Lutheran 
University students will also receive a free 
soda. 

"We will be providing a birthday list 
to Borderline as a means of doublecheck- 
ing IDs. I'm going to have the list sorted 
by May 9 (the day of the event) to ensure 
accuracy," Oshman said. 

Some concerns were brought up about 
the consumption of alcohol and riding the 
mechanical bull. 

"We will need to have someone moni- 
toring the bull. If anyone appears drunk, 
they won't be allowed to ride the bull. 
Even though it would be the company's 
liability, we don't want anyone getting 



hurt," Sally Sagen said. 

There will be two different bands 
playing for a portion of the time during the 
evening. 

The deejay and the bands will alternate 
throughout the course of night. At 11:30 
hip hop will be played. 

Free Your Mind will be held in Kings- 
men Park from 11 a.m. until 1:30 p.m. Its 
intent is to allow CLU students a few hours 
to relax before they head into finals week. 
"We will have an obstacle course, a 
dunk tank and music. It should be a blast," 
Kristin Mathre said. 

Programs Board is looking into giving 
out care packages to those who participate 
in the event. The event is all planned and 
should run smoothly. 



Programs Board reflected on the 
Spring Formal, which was held on April 12 
at the Disneyland Hotel. 

"The deejay played too much music 
from the '80s, but it wasn't really his fault 
because we had a music list that contained 
a ton of requests for that type of music. 
There were some complaints, but overall I 
think it was fine. There were always lots of 
people on the dance floor." board member 
Elissa Jordan said. 

- "We also had complaints about the 
price of drinks. Many students wanted 
soda to be included with their meal ticket. 
However, the hotel would have charged us 
an extra $9 a plate if soda had been includ- 
ed in with the meal," Jordan said. "Overall, 
the program was a great success." 



Students hang loose 
at 5th annual luau 



By Jessica Laufman 
Staff Writer 



The chill of the cold evening was 
soon forgotten when students received a 
warm Aloha greeting and shell leis as they 
stepped into the gym for the 5th annual 
Club Lu Hawaiian Luau. The event was 
held from 8-10 p.m. last Friday in the gym. 
The festivities were open to the public; stu- 
dents and staff received free admission and 
the fee was S3 for all other visiting guests. 

The tables in the gym were filled to 
capacity with supporters of the night's 
primary entertainment performed by the 
Polynesian dance class. The entire group 
opened the show with a hip-shaking, Tahi- 
tian-style dance, with the dancers wearing 
matching Hawaiian-print wraps. Smaller 
groups of dancers continued to perform 
other expressive huia dances throughout 
the evening as well. 

Freshman Meggie Graves was a 
spectator and enjoyed the unique style of 
dancing. 

"The girls were really prepared; it took 
a lot of courage to get up and perform some 
of those dances," Graves said. 

A special hula performance by the 
student-elected luau court received a lot of 
audience reaction. Junior Jimmy Fox was 



amused by the performance, especially by 
sophomore Adam Jussel. 

"It was a side of him I have never seen 
and a side I hope to never see again," Fox 
said. 

Other entertainment included hula 
lessons, craft-making and a Hawaiian 
backdrop to take pictures. Stations were 
set up for participants to make fabric 
flowers, candy ieis and Hawaiian frames. 
Raffle tickets were distributed at the door; 
the grand prize was a $500 voucher toward 
a trip to Hawaii. 

Hawaiian-style refreshments were 
also offered that contributed to the luau 
atmosphere. Shaved ice, pineapples, cake 
and punch were available to hungry par- 
ticipants. 

The Hawaiian Club and Student Pro- 
grams sponsored the luau. The Hawaiian 
Club is composed of 20-30 CLU students, 
and has been planning the Luau event for 
the majority of the year. 

Member June Lum from Honolulu is 
a member of the club and helped work the 
front entrance to the event. 

"One of the reasons for the luau was 
to spread Hawaiian culture and to get other 
people involved and aware. My favorite 
part was the dancing because the music is 
the most authentic," Lum said. 



The Echo is looking for a sports editor 
and proofreaders for the 2003 Fall semester 

Interested students should call or e-mail the Echo 
(x3645 or echo@clunet.edu) 



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Features 



April 30, 2003 



Campus Quotes 



What was the best event this year? 




Betsey Roig, liberal studies major, class of Doug Sherlock, biology major, class of 2006 
2006 



Herman Gamnes, marketing communication Mike McCarthy, computer science/multimedia 
major, class of 2005 major, class of 2006 



"Dodgeball was one of the best events at CLU "Spring Formal was awesome, just like prom." "Orientation weekend is the best event that "I thought Midnight Madness was the best 
because the upperclassmen were defeated." CLU puts on." event this year." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jon Gonzales 



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April 30. 2003 



The Echo 5 



Arts 

"Company" opened this weekend 
at Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza 



By Christian Coleman 
Staff writer 



"Company" is a musical play that 
takes place in contemporary New York 
City about a lonely thirty-five-year-old 
man who is having doubts about getting 
married. All of his friends are married, 
some with kids, others with bizarre mari- 
tal problems, but all of them have the one 
thing that Robert, played by Michael Fal- 
cone, a freshman at CLU, doesn't have: 
a significant other to love and cherish. 
The play is full of laughter and darkness 
at the same time, allowing the audience 
to see the duality of Robert's dilemma. 
Robert is a complicated individual that 
is simultaneously dating three women, 
but has never mustered up the courage to 
propose to any one of them. His married 
friends try repeatedly to encourage him 
to get married, and slowly, his emotions 
towards marriage change as the play 
progresses. By the end of the musical, he 
finally realizes that the most important 
thing in life is to have company, the com- 
pany of a person who loves you through 



the good and bad times in life. 

The musical debuted at the Scherr 
Forum Theatre in the Thousand Oaks 
Civic Arts Plaza on April 25 and will 
continue on to May 2, 3 and 4. The cast 
consisted of 14 characters five married 
couples, three of Robert's girlfriends, 
and Robert, the unmarried bachelor. The 
married couples are played by: Robert 
Schneider, who plays Harry, and is a 
sophomore at CLU, and was last seen on 
stage in "Hay Fever." Kristine Ritterbush 
plays Sarah, and has performed in other 
CLU productions such as "Five Women 
Wearing the Same Dress," "Quilters," 
"Hay Fever." Ritterbush is also involved 
with the Kingsmen Shakespeare festival 
and CLU choir. Alex Gonzalez plays Da- 
vid. He is currently a freshman majoring 
in theatre, and his experience in theatre 
spans almost a decade including roles in 
"Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor 
Dreamcoat," "Charlie and the Chocolate 
Factory," and "Jekyll and Hyde." Angie 
McCoy, a graduating senior, plays Jenny. 
McCoy will be pursuing her Master's de- 
gree in speech communication, this fall 
at Colorado State University. Paul Benz 



plays Larry, and is a sophomore drama 
major. Benz has appeared in "Southern 
Illinois Nights," "Dancing at Lughnasa," 
"A View from the Bridge" and "Blood 
Wedding." Brianne Davis plays Joanne 
and was in last year's "Quilters." Rob 
Williamson from "Dancing at Lughnasa" 
and "A View From the Bridge" plays 
Paul. Dana Shaw plays Amy, and is a 
senior majoring in liberal studies. Kevin 
Andreen plays Peter. He is a junior and 
a history major with a concentration in 
social science; a minor in psychology 
and has performed with the American 
Musical Theatre Ensemble for two years. 
Molly Stilliens plays Susan, Stilliens is 
a sophomore from Santa Maria majoring 
in music and hopes to one day be a choir 
conductor. Joannie Bryan plays April, 
and is a junior majoring in drama.. Alicia 
Jordan plays Marta, and is a freshman 
double majoring in drama and liberal 
studies. Anne Marie Bjordal, who plays 
Kathy is a senior drama major. 

"I had lots of fun working with such 
talented people. It's a pleasure to be able 
to work with such good actors and ac- 
tresses. I hope that the audience comes 



out laughing and feeling good after they 
see the performance," Williamson said. 

There are a total of 14 cast 
members, 19 musical numbers and 23 
crew members in the production. Some 
of the play's participants commented on 
their experience. 

"Bonding with the cast was an im- 
portant and enriching experience for me. 
Working on a project such as "Company" 
is powerful becomes it conveys positive 
feelings in a very negative world. I re- 
ally hope the Thousand Oaks community 
sees this wonderful play. A big thanks 
goes out to the CLU alumni, students, 
and parents who attended the opening of 
the show. Also, a thanks goes out to the 
dedicated crew and orchestra members 
that worked very hard to make this show 
a success," Stilliens said. 

"The relationships between the cast 
and crew members are excellent, and 
everyone here got along just fine. But 
there were some technical problems 
throughout the week, but other than that 
the opening night was a huge success," 
said Jennifer Wertheimer, stage manager 
for the play. 



Joy Brittain 's experience in Nepal 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff writer 



The smell of turmeric transports 
Upward Bound Math/Science Director 
Joy Brittain to the years she spent in 
Nepal as a Peace Corps volunteer. She 
lived in villages for almost two years, 
teaching math and science while she 
adapted to a lifestyle without modern 
transportation and with a diet of mostly 
rice and lentils. For the first time, she 
had to trek up and down steep moun- 
tains just to get water or visit a city, 
iodize or boil her water and constantly 
alter her teaching methods. 

More than 20 years later, Brittain 
said that the prejudices and cultural 
differences she confronted while serv- 
ing as an instructor made her a better 
teacher and shattered her biases. 

"I really think that it challenged me 
on all levels," said Brittain, who spent 
almost two years in the country for the 
Peace Corps. "It challenged me physi- 
cally, because I was born and raised on 
Long Island and the highest thing I had 
to climb was a sand dune at the beach. 
Long Island is totally flat. I was not a 
camper and I was not a hiker of any 
type when I was growijig up. Having 
to deal with just the climbing back and 
forth and having to deal with a whole 
different way of preparing food and 
cooking food and even the type of food 
challenged me physically. The main 
food was rice and lentils, and that's just 
very, very different from what I used to 
get growing up. 

"I think it definitely challenged me 
spiritually. I was going into the minis- 
try, and yet I was living in a country 



that was about 80 percent Hindu and 
having to deal with all the rituals, all 
of their sacrificing of animals for their 
rituals and just how they lived their 
particular faith. I never, never thought I 
would be able to get through what I got 
through before I left. I just didn't think 
I had it in me." 

Brittain first learned about the 
Peace Corps from her choir director and 
decided to join before going to graduate 
school. 

"I started college when I was very 
young," Brittain said. "The students at 
the college actually had a great difficul- 
ty with my being so young. I'm not sure 
if they were intimidated or envious. I 
was going into the ministry, and I knew 
I wanted to go on to grad school and I 
didn't want to have the same problems, 
so I wanted to do something different 
maybe between the time I graduated 
from college and the time I started grad 
school. 

The climate varies in Nepal; the 
south is subtropical, but the north has 
cool summers and harsh winters. Brit- 
tain said she researched the climate in 
Nepal before selecting the villages she 
visited. "The one thing I did do was I 
did my homework a little bit," Brittain 
said. "When we had a choice of villages 
to go to, I found out that the east actu- 
ally had a better quality of food; they 
had more vegetables and so forth. They 
had rain as much as everybody else, but 
at least they had more food. The west 
ended up being pretty dry sometimes, 
but during the monsoon season you 
only got cornmeal. The first village was 
called Dhankuta and the second village 
that I lived in was Phagribas. The Ti- 



betan village that I visited quite often 
was between Dhankuta and Phagribas." 
Brittain said that the flexibility she 
acquired from her stay in Nepal is an 
asset for her job and essential for any- 
one considering the Peace Corps. With- 
out her service in Nepal, she would not 
be able to empathize with her students, 
most of who come from Los Angeles 
and Ventura counties, northern Califor- 
nian farmlands, Native-American reser- 
vations and the Pacific Islands. 

"One of the things that the Peace 
Corps is great for is flexibility," Brittain 
said. "You have to be flexible if you're 
going to go into the Peace Corps. In any 
country, not just Nepal, you have to be 
flexible, because what you go in for is 
not necessarily the job that you do. I 
went in to teach sixth- through 10th- 
grade math and science, and I ended 
up doing all these other projects. I did 
a health project, I did a work-study 
project, a farming project [and] I taught 
English. So I think flexibility is a main 
concern; if somebody is not flexible, is 
not willing to be flexible, this is not the 
place to go. ; 

"The program I direct here at CLU 
deals with low-income and first-genera- 
tion college-bound students," Brittain 
said. "Most of the students are minori- 
ties in one way or another and because of 
that, I'm dealing with so many cultural 
exchanges that go on between the stu- 
dents. You have to be flexible in terms 
of what a family will allow a student to 
do or not do, in terms of how that stu- 
dent acts and reacts to situations. Some 
of my students were the boat people 
from Vietnam and dealing with being in 
a mini concentration camp for several 



years before getting here to the States. 
I have to bring [flexibility] in when I'm 
given so many different students of so 
many different ethnic backgrounds with 
this program." 

"It has changed me, not just 
changed me personally, but it's changed 
me professionally," she said. "Because 
I learned, even when I was teaching, 
you may not have all of the resources 
that you think you may need or want 
in teaching and so you're going to 
come up with a different method. I've 
used that several times in my teaching 
where I couldn't get across a particular 
concept. When I taught high school, I 
had to think, 'Okay, how can I get this 
concept across so the student of that 
particular culture will understand it?' 
There are many different ways of learn- 
ing and, because of that, I think I'm a 
better teacher, not only as the director 
within this program, but when I teach 
high school itself, because I'm not so 
stringent on the book." 

Brittain recalled some of her fond- 
est memories as participating in a ritual 
sisterhood. 

"I think being able to be a part 
of some special rituals that not many 
people get to see and to participate 
in is really a great memory," Brittain 
said. "There's the time 1 actually did 
a sisterhood; it's a special sisterhood 
ritual with a particular woman in my 
second village. That was really fun, 
because at that state, at that trust, 
everything that she has is mine and 
everything that I have is hers and 
you have that absolute trust. That's 
why even Nepalis don't do the special 
ritual very often." 



6 The Echo 



Opinion 



april 30, 2003 



CZ5 

o 



fc 



Oh 

o 



How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

echo@clunet.edu 

Letters to the editor 

are welcome on any topic 

related to CLU or The Echo. 

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writer's name, year/position 

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Letters are subject to editing 
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on the following date: 

May 14, 2003 



Spring fever: an epidemic 




By Michele Hatler 
Editor in chief 



Spring has come and even though 
Mother Nature hasn't been cooperating, 
spring fever has spread. The condition 
affects everyone from high school seniors 
to college freshmen up to college gradu- 
ates. Normally attentive and conscientious 
students reach the final part of the spring 



semester and then it all goes downhill. 
We may go to class, and we even try our 
hardest to read those overpriced books, but 
none of us want much to do with academ- 
ics. 

Many students find it extremely dif- 
ficult to go to classes when it's 80 degrees 
outside and to study at home when there 
are those few extra hours of daylight. And 
it's even harder to go to class when the rain 
makes' it a nice day to nap. Spring is a vi- 
rus and the only cure is summer vacation. 
There are warning signs; spring fever be- 
gins slowly, causing students to daydream 
during class lectures when they should be 
taking notes. The virus then travels from 
the brain through the rest of the body, 
causing the student to become dreadfully 
unmotivated. 

Yet, students are still expected to 
perform at the same level as before. They 
are still expected to study. They are still 



expected to meet deadlines. And, most 
difficult, they are still expected to attend 
classes. Seniors expecting to graduate have 
it the worst. They have been in school and 
have reached the end, not facing a summer 
vacation, but a degree. 

The epidemic has already swept across 
the Cal Lu campus. Many of us daydream 
that one day spring fever will become rec- 
ognized as a legitimate disease. Doctor's 
notes would read as follows: Please excuse 
Michele from class for as long as neces- 
sary. She has been treated with a bad case 
of spring fever and is required to be bedrid- 
den in the sands of Key West for the next 
two weeks. I have prescribed her unlimited 
refills of stress-free fun and Coronas. 

However, there are only two and a 
half weeks of this semester until finals. 
End-of-the-semester-projects and term 
papers will consume our time and summer 
will soon begin. 



Staff Editorial 



Have compassion with words 



By Josh Simmons and Emily Beile 
Staff Writer and Guest Writer 



Too many people have to stand silent 
as their race, gender or sexual orientation 
is ridiculed. They fear speaking out against 
the hate they feel from society and their 
peers. This Easter I found out that a friend 
of mine had committed suicide. This 13- 
year-old was openly gay, and even though 
he had supportive friends, he was tired of 
constantly hearing gays being ridiculed by 
his peers and society. 

This boy. Bob, had been keeping an 
online journal where he expressed his feel- 
ings, including his dislike for the phrase 
"that's so gay." People who use this 
phrase do not realize that by using it, they 
are implying that there is some connection 
between "bad" and "gay." Bob wrote, "So 
many have to live with being called 'fag' 
day in and day out; so many have to live in 
a society where when somebody wants to 
show their annoyance at something, more 
than often, you'll hear 'that's so gay.' 

So many have to go through this pain, 
and don't have anyone or anything to get 
it all out on, so they resort to themselves." 



Though this statement was referring to the 
death of Chris Dow, the 16-year-old Mira 
Loma High School (Sacramento) student 
who committed suicide after telling his fa- 
ther he was gay, this was written less than 
a month before Bob's death. 

Bob also wrote, "1 [cannot help but] 
think how damn homophobic society is, 
and how it hurts more than people know. 
How it hurts people so much that the only 
way they feel they can escape the constant 
pain is to kill themselves, and not wake up 
in the morning and go through emotional, 
sometimes physical hell." 

The more I read his Web site, the 
more I felt there needs to be a change. 
Students need to speak out for each other, 
not against one another. School is hard 
enough without worrying about peers 
hating something within yourself that you 
cannot control. 

His death has touched many people, 
particularly those in the Davis/Sacramento 
area. In his online journal there have been 
over 120 responses to his final entry where 
people express their condolences and tell 
him the things they wish they had been 
able to tell him while he was alive. His en- 
tries have people writing, "I wish I hadn't 
said that one thing" over and over again. 



If there is one thing to learn from this, 
it is to be accepting of people, even if they 
are different. It is the mixture of different 
ideas, cultures and beliefs that makes us 
a great society. I was a counselor for two 
years at an Episcopal Church camp where 
Bob was a camper. While the rest of the 
campers were talking about Pokemon and 
other "kid stuff," Bob and I discussed 
politics and religion. He was one of the 
smartest people 1 have ever met. 

We were very different: I like "corpo- 
rate clothes" and Bob liked thrift shops. 
I am a Republican and he was Green. I 
wanted to move to Texas and he wanted 
to move to Berkeley. 1 did, however, leam 
a lot from the life and death of Bob. Our 
society needs to be more compassionate. 
I know how much it hurts to be ridiculed; 
I wish we could all feel some of the pain 
that Bob was feeling so that we would take 
that extra second and think before we said 
something hurtful. 

Next time, think before you put some- 
one down just because they have different 
beliefs, morals or values. Words are so 
much more powerful than we can imagine. 
Please, think before you speak: you never 
know who's listening. Remember, words 
can hurt; words can kill. 



The 



Echo Staff 



Michele Hatler 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/ 
Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 

Business Manager 

Brett Rowland 

News Editor 

Karen Peterson 
Arts & Features Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Opinon Editor 



Katie Bashaw 
Sports Editor 

Scott Gasperino 
Photo Editor 

Eric Ingemunson 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 

Copy Editor 

Heather Molloy 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Editorial Mailer: The stall of The Echo welcomes comments 
on ils articles as well as on the newspaper itself. However, the 
staff acknowledges that opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Echo reserves the right lo edit all stories, 
editorials, letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
icsiricuoos, accuracy and style. All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Advertising Matter: Escept as clearly implied by the adverts: 
ing party of otherwise specifically staled, advcniscmclils in The 
Echo are inserted by commercial activiues or venrures identi- 
fied in the advertisements themselves and not by California 
Lutheran University Advertising material printed herein is 
solely for informational purposes. Such printing is nut to be 
construed as a written and Implied sponsorship, endorsement, 
or investigation of such commercial enterprises or ventures. 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (8051 493-3865. 



Inquiries: Inquiries aboul this newspaper should be addressed 
to the Editor in Chief. The Echo, California Lutheran Univer- 
sity. 60 West Olsen Road. Thousand Oaks, CA 92360-2787. 
Telephone: (805) 493-3465; Fan: (8051 493-3327. E-mail 
ccho@clunel-cdu. 



April 30, 2003 



Sports 



The Echo 7 



Golf team battles for top 
placement in conference 



By Luke Patten 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran golf team hit 
the stretch drive of their season over the 
last few weeks with a victory in conference 
play over Whittier and two conference 
tournaments. 

In the match-up with Whittier, the 
Kingsmen didn't play as well as they had 
earlier in the season, but they still managed 
to come away with a 320-332 victory over 
the Poets. 

Junior Jordan Silvertrust led the Kings- 
men that day by shooting rounds of 37 and 
35 to finish the day with a one-over-par 72. 
That score equaled Silvertrust's best round 
of the season. 

The rest of the CLU team consisted of 
senior Matt Holland (39-40) who shot 79, 
freshman Adam Hollinger (43-4 1 ) who fin- 
ished with an 84, sophomore Jason Poyser 
(44-41) who ended with an 85, freshman 
Peder Nyhus (41-44) posted an 85 as well. 



and freshman Austin Aker (50-42) who 
struggled through a tough front nine to fin- 
ish with a 92. 

The team then began the conference 
tournaments with one of their worst per- 
formances of the season. 

As a team, the Kingsmen couldn't 
seem to find any kind of luck on the back 
nine. Despite this, they still managed a 
score of 340. which was good enough for 
fifth place out of the eight teams. 

Holland said that the team just couldn't 
get itself straightened out and was in a funk 
for most of the day. 

"None of us played well," said Hol- 
land. "There was no reason for it; I guess 
it was just one of those days." 

Silvertrust was the low scorer for the 
Kingsmen on the day with a round of 82 
(37-45). He finished in a tie for 13th place 
overall. 

Other Kingsmen who competed were 
Hollinger (44-40) with a score of 84, Poy- 
ser (41-46) who finished with an 87, Aker 



(43-45) who shot an 88, Holland (40-50) 
who scored a 90. and Nyhus (38-52), who 
also ended at 90. 

The Kingsmen then had to quickly get 
their games figured out and focus on the 
second of the conference tournaments. Ea- 
ger to show its capabilities, the team came 
back with a score of 308 which placed 
them second for the day. 

Holland said they had some strong 
motivation for this tournament. 

"I think [the first tournament] just lit 
a fire under us. We all wanted to end the 
season on a good note so we buckled down 
[at practice] and posted better scores," said 
Holland. 

Silvertrust (37-39) and Aker (41-35) 
both led the way for CLU this time as both 
finished with rounds of 76. 

Hollinger (40-37) scored an 87, Nyhus 
(40-39) ended with an 89. Holland (38-45)' 
completed a round of 83, and senior Randy 
Cox (44-40) posted an 84 to round out the 
Kingsmen team. 



Scholar-athl etes play intramurals, too 



By Alex Espinoza 
Staff Writer 



The Intramural Sports program is open 
to everyone, even athletes who participate 
in intercollegiate sports. 

Many participants in IM sports in the 
spring semester are football players, and 
Kingsmen head coach Scott Squires has no 
problem with that. 

"I think the program is set up for ev- 
eryone to enjoy friendly competition. I, 
myself, played IMs when I was in college," 
said Squires. 

Three IM sports are offered during the 
spring semester: indoor soccer, basketball 
and Softball. 

Basketball is by far the most popular of 
the three. Most football players who play 
IM sports, play basketball and the games 
can get very intense and competitive. 
This high level of intensity leads to a risk 
of injury that could affect athletes' playing 
careers. 

"There is a risk of injury in any sport, 
but if they're going to get hurt, it happens. 
That's why as a coach, 1 prefer they don't 
play them while in season. The time com- 
mitment they put into school and football 
doesn't really leave them time for it any- 
way," said Squires. 



Sophomore Jimmy Gentry, an of- 
fensive lineman for the Kingsmen, who 
played IM indoor soccer and basketball 
said, "I play because I used to play bas- 
ketball in high school and it gives me 
something to do. It gives me a chance to 
get away from my school work and play 
ball with my friends." 

Geoff Dains. an assistant coach for the 
Kingsmen basketball team, not only allows 
his players to play, but himself played IM 
Softball and will appear tomorrow night 
at the basketball championship game as a 
member of Sloppy Seconds. 

"I think it's fun to hang out with the 
students and athletes in a competitive at- 
mosphere," said Dains. 

Like Squires, Dains prefers his athletes 
participate in IMs during the off-season as 
to avoid injuries that could prevent them 
from playing in the upcoming season. Oth- 
er than that, he believes the IM program is 
a good thing for athletes. 

"It's a great program. The players can 
have fun and build team comraderie during 
the off-season," he said. 

While some coaches have no appre- 
hension about their players playing IM 
sports, track & field coach Scott Fickerson 
has some worries. 

"I allow my athletes to do it, but I 



warn them that there is a chance they can 
get injured and it could affect their perfor- 
mance. !f they want to play, then they can 
play. I just want them to be careful," said 
Fickerson. 

Carly Sandeil, a sophomore on the 
CLU track team, played IM basketball and 
Softball. The only problem is her coach 
didn't know about it. 

"I try to be careful when I'm out there 
playing because I know our coach really 
doesn't want us to play. I just really enjoy 
playing and meeting new people," said 
Sandeil. 

Sandeil admits that it was hard at times 
to juggle school, track and IMs at the same 
time. With most of the track meets on Fri- 
days and Saturdays, a conflict arose when 
she had a late basketball game on Thursday 
night and then a meet on the next day. 

The majority of coaches have no prob- 
lem with their athletes participating in the 
IM program, as long as they do it during 
the off-season. 

The coaches understand that by being 
Division III athletes, athletics is not the 
main priority and students should be able 
to get involved in other activities. But the 
coaches have offered some advice to those 
athletes who do play IM sports: have fun 
and be careful. 



Atop the 
SCIAC, 
Softball 
waits for 
Regionals 

By John Bona 
Stak- Writer 



The Cal Lutheran softball team cap- 
tured its sixth SCIAC championship last 
week as second-place La Veme was de- 
feated by Claremont-Mudd-Scripps, giv- 
ing the Regals sole possession of the title. 
The Regals finish the season with a 22-18 
overall record, going 14-4 in SCIAC play. 

With their main goal accomplished, 
the Regals' next task will be to win Re- 
gionals, which begin next week. 

"Before the season, our goal was to 
win conference and go to Regionals." said 
first-year manager Debbie Day. "Now our 
focus is on winning Regionals and taking a 
shot at the College World Series." 

It's been a while since the Regals have 
taken the field, since their last season game 
was almost two weeks ago. The team has 
tried to use this valuable time off to hone 
their skills and prepare themselves men- 
tally for the mission ahead. 

"We've been trying to keep the routine 
the same," said outfielder Carrie Mitchell. 
"Rather than change anything we've been 
doing, we're going to go with what got us 
here. We just need to keep up our intensity 
and hold on to our confidence." 

Although the team has improved great- 
ly since last season, many have speculated 
that this young Regals team is not quite 
ready to take the next step. Yet, the attitude 
among the players is entirely different. 

"I'm very excited about this team," se- 
nior Chelsea Barrella says. "This team puts 
in 100 percent every day and every single 
person is fully focused and ready to win. If 
we put our minds to it, there is no team we 
can't beat." 

Pairings for Regionals will be an- 
nounced next week. While the Regals' 
destiny is uncertain, one thing remains 
clear. No matter what the circumstances. 
Day knows that she will always receive the 
best from her team. 

"This has really been a hard-working 
team," Day said. "We have fought hard all 
season long and we're not looking back." 



INTRAMURALS 

spring championship series 

BASKETBALL 

Chips & Salsa v. Sloppy Seconds 
Thursday, May 1 @ 9 p.m. - gym 
halftime performance by the Regal dancers * prizes awarded * 

SOFTBALL 

Pink Bunny Rabbits v. Daryl Strawberry 
Sunday, May 4 - softball field 

2 p.m. - home run derby 
3 p.m. - championship game 



Track and Field 

Based orl performances at a preliminary meet on Saturday, the fol- 
lowing athletes qualified for the SCIAC Championships Track and 
Field meet on Monday, April 28, at the University of La Veme. At press 
time, no results were available. 

Sophomore Marcus Green - 1 00m, 200m 
Senior Tom Ham - 1 500m 
Senior Grant Kincade - 110m hurdles 
Freshman Denise French - 200m, 400m 
Sophomore Jacquie Ramirez - 100m 
Freshman Lindsey Moore - 800m 
Freshman Heather Worden - 1500m 
Sophomore Carly Sandeil - 1500m 
Junior Leah Bingham 1 00m hurdles 



8 The Echo 



Sports 



Kingsmen drop two; lose 
sight of R egional spot 



April 30, 2003 



By Sean-Micheal Porter 
Staff Writer 



The Cal Lutheran baseball team 
dropped a pair of games, 4-3 and 11-3. 
against La Veme in a double header Satur- 
day, April 26, at North Field, beat La Veme 
17-3 Friday. April 25 at La Veme and 
then split a pair of nonconference games 
at home beating Westmont 8-0 Thursday, 
April 17, and losing 5-2 to Point Loma 
Wednesday, April 16. 

In game one of the double header 
Saturday, the Kingsmen were up 3-2 in the 
eighth before La Veme tallied two two-out 
runs. Senior Brian Skaug hit a solo home 
run down the left field line in the third in- 
ning to give Cal Lu a 2- 1 lead. 

Senior Ryan Melvin pitched for seven 
and a half innings, striking out five Leop- 
ards in the loss. Scott Linden for La Veme« 
threw a complete game and struck out eight 
CLU batters while walking none. 

The Leopards held a 6-3 lead going 
into the ninth inning of the second game 
and then added five runs to put the game 
out of reach. Junior Ryan Ayers suffered 
the loss as he gave up four runs in four in- 
nings. La Verne's Derek King picked up 
the win in six innings of play. 

"They played very tough." said senior 
Matt James, who had two hits in the game. 
"They kept the momentum all day." 

However, it was Cal Lu who had the 
momentum in game one of the three game 
series Friday. The Kingsmen posted 14 
hits in the game including scoring multiple ' 
runs in every inning except the second and 
third. Nine of the runs came off La Verne's 
seven errors on the field. 

Senior Jason Claros was solid going 
3-for-6 with three RBI and a ran. He also 




photograph b> Summer Scarborough 
Senior Jeff Meyers takes a trip around the bases after a home run against Westmont 
College in the Kingsmen i 8-0 shutout on April 1 7. 



hit the only home run in the game with a 
three-run jack to right field in the eighth in- 
ning. Skaug also had three hits and scored 
four times. 

"We hit the ball hard all day," Skaug 
said. 

On the mound, junior Jason Hirsh 
played well as he gave up just six hits and 
struck out six batters. La Veme starter Al- 
lan Sarrall took the loss as he gave up 10 
runs on nine hits in five innings. Although 
CLU took the first game easily, the overall 
outcome of the weekend series did not sit 
right with Kingsmen players. 

"It seemed like we didn't get any 
breaks on Saturday," said Skaug. 

The week before, Cal Lu played back- 
to-back nonconference games first losing 
to Point Loma Wednesday, April 16. 

CLU was trailing 4-0 before scoring 
a ran in the fifth and again sixth inning. 
Junior Ed Edsall hit a homer in the fifth 
to bring Cal Lu within three runs. Skaug 



doubled down the right field line and was 
plated by a J.R. Cortez single in the sixth. 

Freshman Matt Hirsh suffered the 
loss as he gave up four runs on seven hits 
through six innings. 

In the 8-0 shut out against Westmont 
on Thursday, April 17, CLU scored five 
runs in the first inning. Three runs came 
off of a home run by senior Luke Stajcar. 
Stajcar then hit a solo bomb to center in 
the seventh inning, finishing the day going 
3-for-4. 

Senior Jeff Myers also hit a home run 
for CLU. 

Ayers picked up the win giving up just 
two hits and striking out five batters in six 
innings. Jason Hirsh pitched three innings 
and struck out three to pick up the save. 

Overall the Kingsmen are 24-13 and 
14-4 in league play. CLU finishes its 
regular season with the possibility to win 
the conference with a three-game series 
against Redlands. May 2-3. 



this week's 

Kingsmen & 

Regals action 



Today, April 30 

-golf at SCIAC 
Championships, round 3 



Friday, May 2 

-m tennis at West 
Regionals 

-baseball v. Redlands 
*LAST HOME GAME 
3 p.m. 



Saturday, May 3 

-m tennis at West 

Regionals 

-w tennis at West 

Regionals 

-baseball at Redlands 



Sunday, May 4 

-w tennis at West 
Regionals 



home games indicated by italics 



Tennis teams advance at 'the Ojai' 



KINGSMEN: Marandy loses one match in 
conference competition, redeems himself at 
the Ojai Valley Tournament 



By Victor Esquer 
Staff Writer 



The CLU men's tennis team continued 
its stellar play with huge wins over Chap- 
man and Pomona on April 12 to head into 
the SCIAC Championships undefeated. 
The Kingsmen guaranteed themselves a 
spot in the title match with a 4-0 sweep of 
Occidental and a 5-2 victory against Red- 
lands. Marandy once again kept his perfect 
season alive as he won at the No. 1 singles 
for both matches. 

Arif Hasan defeated Rob Condiotti of 
Redlands in the No. 2 singles contest. The 
Kingsmen then moved on to the SCIAC 
championship, where they fell 6-1 to Cla- 
remont-Mudd-Scripps. 

They finished in second in conference 
behind Claremont, while Redlands took 
third and Pomona placed fourth. 

Marandy suffered his first loss of the 
season as he fell 6-2, 6-4 to Claremont's 
Ivan Yeh in the No. 1 singles match. Hasan 
and Quoc Ly won their match at No. 2 
doubles, while Quinn Calderon won his 
No. 4 singles match for the Kingsmen. 



The Kingsmen finished their season 
15-4 overall and 8-2 in conference. The 
season didn't stop there for some Kings- 
men, though. Four Kingsmen were able to 
move on to the Ojai Valley Tennis Tourna- 
ment. 

Marandy and Quinn Caldaron ad- 
vanced to the quarterfinals after defeating 
Matt Brunner and Johji Cham-a-koon re- 
spectively in their singles matches. 

Hasan was ousted by J.R. Hall of Po- 
mona Pitzer 6-4, 6-1, and Junya Hasebe 
was defeated by Ivan Yeh of Claremont 
6-2, 6-0 in the round of 16. 

In the quarterfinals, the untouchable 
Marandy defeated Zach Myers of Clare- 
mont 6-2, 6-4. Caldaron was unable to 
come out victorious in his match as he was 
defeated by David Frankel of Pomona. 

After cruising through the quarterfi- 
nals, Marandy put away Frankel of Po- 
mona in the semifinals. 

His next victim was Brian Casey 
of UC Santa Cruz as he defeated him in 
straight sets 6-3, 6-2 to take home the 
Division III Men's Singles title at the Ojai 
Valley Tennis Tournament. 



REGALS: Dynamite duo of Hunau and 
Novajosky make it to the third round of the 
prestigious tournament 



By Etienne Emanuel 
Staff Writer 



Cal Lutheran's women's tennis team 
sent two pair of competitors to the annual 
Ojai Open Invitational Tournament this 
past weekend. 

Becca Hunau and Lisa Novajosky as 
well as Jen Hansen and Stephanie Perkins 
were the Regals No. I and No. 2 doubles 
teams this season. 

Hunau and Novajosky advanced to 
the semi-final round after taking the vic- 
tory over familiar rival Chapman Univer- 
sity when Sarah Densen of Chapman went 
down in the second set with a sprained 
ankle. 

Chapman had won the first set 6-2, but 
the Cal Lu tandem had a commanding 5-2 
lead in the second. 

"We dug ourselves a hole to start, but 
we were picking it up in that second set. I 
felt like we would have had the momentum 
going into the final set; unfortunately it 
came down to an injury," said Novajosky. 

The duo next faced conference foe 
Pomona Pitzer. The two easily blew past 



the Sagehens 6-2, 6-1. 

"We carried our momentum from the 
last set into this match. Lisa really got go- 
ing and that got me fired up and we took 
care of business," Hunau said. 

They next faced off against Point 
Loma, where their run ended. 

Cal Lutheran's other doubles team did 
not fare quite as well. Hansen and Perkins 
won their opening match vs. CSU Los An- 
geles, 6-4 and 7-5. 

Hansen and Perkins next matched up 
against SCIAC doubles champions Whit- 
ney Henderson and Kellie Howard. Cal 
Lutheran came up short 6-0 and 6-4. 

"We were so flat in the first set it was 
hard to get anything going. We started 
to come back in the second, it was just 
too late. And they're a good team," said 
Hansen. 

In single action, Hunau fell to Azusa 
Pacific's Mayu Sato, 6-3, 6-1. Hansen de- 
feated Chapman's Tiffany Lewis, 6-1, 6-2. 
Hansen next faced top seeded Anna 
Sieczka of Point Loma who defeated Han- 
sen, 6-1,6-1. 



California Lutheran University 



The 



Echo 



Volume 43, No. 23 



60 West Olsen Road, Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 



Sports 

Kingsmen baseball sweeps 
Redlands to end season. 



See story page 8 



May 7, 2003 



Features 



Rotaract Club goes to Mexico. 



See story page 4 



News 

Hazing: An in-depth look 
at hazing and athletics at CLU. 



See story page 3 



Honors Day lifts CLU 



By Jessica Laufman 
Staff Writer 

California Lutheran University stu- 
dents and alumni were celebrated for their 
achievements at the annual Honors Day 
Convocation in the Samuelson Chapel last 
Friday, May 2 at 10 a.m. 

Holly Solberg, a 1991 CLU graduate, 
was the featured guest speaker. Solberg 
entered her college career with an inter- 
est in medicine that slowly faded after she 
became involved with volunteer programs. 
She was particularly inspired after par- 
ticipating in outreach programs for urban 
neighborhoods with the campus ministry 
group. 

Her volunteer experiences led to her 
decision, after graduation, to join the Peace 
Corps. 

"The Peace Corps was a life-altering 
experience; it really changed the perspec- 
tive on my life forever," Solberg said. "I 
met people who, in terrible poverty, still 
had such generosity and acceptance to- 
ward me." 

Solberg continued her humanitarian 
efforts when she started her career work- 
ing for Care International, a rehabilitation 
and relief group aiding countries in crisis. 
Currently she is assistant country director 
at the headquarters office in Addis Ababa, 
Ethiopia. Her job involves traveling all 



over the world preparing and supporting 
countries in despair. 

Solberg credits her path in life to being 
open and positive of the choices that are 
offered. She believes everyone has been 
given talents; they just have to do what is 
in their hearts. 

"I didn't have a plan, and still today do 
not know what exactly that plan is going 
to be," Solberg said. "Life works, and my 
best piece of advice is to follow your heart 
and be proactive in shaping and controlling 
your path." 

Freshman Grace May was delighted 
by the advice of the guest speaker. 

"It was really reassuring to hear that at 
age 34 she still was uncertain about what 
she was going to do in life," May said. 

Honor students were also recognized 
at the ceremony for their academic and 
personal achievements of the past year. 
The presentation of honors celebrated the 
recipients of the Dean's List, departmental 
honors, departmental assistantships and 
the Dean's Award. Newly endowed schol- 
arships and their donors were introduced 
as well. 

Piri Piroska Bodnar, who has been au- 
diting classes at CLU since 1989, was giv- 
en the Life-Long Learning Award. Bodnar 
has written a book about her experiences 
during the Holocaust and spoken in many 
classes about the same. 



CLU students cheer; 
Dodgers lose in rain 



By Jessica Laufman 
Staff Writer 



A very different Club-Lu was held 
last Friday night at Dodger stadium where 
students were confronted with rainy and 
cold weather as they watched the game. 
The Pittsburgh Pirates beat the Los An- 
geles Dodgers 5-3 as over 200 California 
Lutheran University students watched in 
the stands. 

"Those of us who stayed until the very 
end got soaked, but it was tons of fun and 
well worth it," senior Sally Sagen said. 

The game started at 7: 10 and was one 
of two games against the Pirates that were 
played last weekend. The weather allowed 
the game to get through the fourth inning 
when the persistant rain started to cause 
aggravation among the players and the 
fans. Although many fans gave in to the 
rain and packed up, many CLU students 
bundled up in rain jackets and blankets and 
sat it out. 

"The rain was sort of fun. It didn't 
seem to bother me at all," senior Matthew 



Martinson said. Well through the fifth in- 
ning the umpires had the grounds crew 
dump fresh dirt on the mound and in front 
of the bases. This allowed the game to con- 
tinue through the rain. 

Dodger fans didn't let the rain get the 
best of them as they attempted to keep 
things alive. One man tried time after time 
to get a wave going from one side of the 
stadium to the other, while vendors contin- 
ued to walk up and down the stairs selling 
cotton candy, peanuts, chocolate shakes 
and other snacks. 

"I would say that the best thing about 
coming to Dodger Stadium was seeing my 
CLU friends and watching the game to- 
gether," senior Emily Holden said. "It was 
just too much fun." 

The last Club Lu of the year will be 
held this Friday. The day will start with 
lunch in the park and a dunk tank. Later 
that night, Club Lu will offer another event 
for CLU students called the 'Lu Down.' It 
will be held at the Borderline and will of- 
fer free food, a mechanical bull, music and 
dancing. 




Photograph b> Summer Scarborough 
Piri Piroska Bodnar (left) accepts the CLU Life-Long Learning Award at Convocation 
in the Samuelson Chapel last Friday. 

Seniors prepare 
for graduation 



By Gianina Lomedico 
Staff Writer 



In 10 days, seniors will be able to em- 
bark on the conclusory milestone of their 
college experience. After graduation, on 
May 17, at 10:30 a.m. at Mt. Clef Stadium, 
California Lutheran University seniors will 
begin the transition to their future careers 
and move on with their lives. Some seniors 
have made plans, while others are letting 
time take its course. 

Senior Erika Gervoi is excited about 
all the adventures she has planned af- 
ter graduation. In June, she is marrying 
CLU student Jesse Creydt in Vancouver, 
Canada. 

"I am excited to start that chapter of 
my life with Jesse," Gervoi said. 

After her wedding, she will attend 
school in Chicago for her master's degree 
in marriage and family therapy. She wants 
to focus on being a psychologist because 
"people are interesting and they are always 
surprising me." 

Creydt will enter a master's program 
while working in Chicago. A Midwestern 
native, Creydt returns to the area in which 
he grew up. 

"It will be good to be back in the Mid- 
west; however, California will always have 
a warm place in my heart," Creydt said. 

Christin Newby has been accepted 
to Loyola Marymount University in the 
master's program for forensic psychology. 



She is interested in work ing for the Ventura 
County Department of Probation and be- 
coming a police officer for the Los Angeles 
Police Department. Newby wants to make 
an impact on society as a police officer. 

"It frustrates me how people act in so- 
ciety," Newby said. "Most cops nowdays 
will give you a warning and will let you 
go [for your first offense.] I believe people 
should get what they deserve." 

Jenny Olson will use her geology de- 
gree during a two-month field camp in the 
mountains of Utah. In a year after gradu- 
ation, she plans to move to Colorado to 
become a forest ranger for Estes National 
Park. 

"I am not a city girl," Olson said. "I 
need nature, trees, snow and animals. I do 
not like the desert and this type of Mediter- 
ranean climate." 

Wade Anderson, an exercise science 
and sports medicine major, wants to enter 
in a physical education master's program 
at Azusa Pacific University or Cal State 
Bakersfield. 

He plans to work at a physical therapy 
clinic in Thousand Oaks, Calif. A Central 
Valley California native, Anderson will 
remain in Southern California because he 
believes there are more options here for 
him. 

Anderson has mixed emotions about 
graduating. "I am excited, but on the other 
hand, not because my plans are not set and 
known," he said. 



Calendar 



2 The Echo 



may 7, 2003 




a sneak peek of this week at the lu 




today 

may 7 



Worship 

Chape] 
10:10 a.m. 

Church Council Meeting 

Chapel Lounge 
7:30 p.m. 

Common Ground 

Chapel 
9:11 p.m. 




thursday 

may 8 

Senior Banquet 

Pavilion 
6 p.m. 

The NEED 

SUB 
10 p.m. 

friday 

may 9 



Spirit Day 

Kingsmen Park 
All Day 



Club LU - Talent Show 

Gym 
9 p.m. 





Happy Mother s Day 



Lord of Life Picnic 

3:30 p.m. 

Church 

Chapel 
6:15 p.m. 



monday 

may 12 

Finals Week 

tuesday 

may 13 

Finals Week 






Happy 

Mother V 

V ay II I 



ood Luck on your 
Finals!!! 



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Congratulations 

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and 
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on being among the 2003 
Cal Lu Graduates 



California Lutheran- University Delivers Student Financial Aid Award Packages 

Online 

"Your Electronic Award" Solution Speeds and Simplifies Process, 
Makes Awards Easy to Understand and Evaluate 

Beginning in April 2003, California Lutheran University is presenting financial aid award packages to all 
students online - speeding the notification process and enabling students to finalize financial arrangements 

sooner. 
Each online award notification is accompanied by additional tools and Web links to help students evaluate 

their preferred financing methods. 



J 



The Math Lab at 

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University 

At the Math Lab we offer FREE 

tutoring for all math from 

basic Algebra to Calculus and 

beyond! 

Our location is in the F building 
room 10, in between the 
Ed/Tech building\ and the D 
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We have laptops available for 
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The tutors are friendly AND 
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Please take advantage of our 
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May 7, 2003 



News 



Hazing: Not at Cal Lu 



The Echo 3 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



Hazing or similar initiation rituals can 
endanger the lives of their participants, 
resulting in humiliation, hospitalization or 
even death. 

However, despite rumors of hazing 
at California Lutheran University, none 
has been reported either officially or unof- 
ficially. 

According to Athletics Director Bruce 
Bryde and Safety and Security manager 
Klay Peterson, the university prohibits 
hazing or any other similar "rites of pas- 
sage" on- or off-campus. Hazing includes 
experiencing pressure to do something one 
would not normally do and violates CLU 
policy and California State law. Student- 
athletes sign a Notification of Expectations 
document at the eligibility meeting each 
year, indicating that they are aware of the 
athletic department's policies. According 
to Peterson, hazing is defined in Sections 
32050 and 32051 of the California Educa- 
tion Code and any report of hazing would 
go through the security and police depart- 
ments. 

Bryde said that the athletic department 
tries to discourage athletes from hazing 
and that the university's efforts against 
hazing are successful. 

Peterson said that there are no reported 
incidents of hazing at the university. 

"That's not to say it doesn't go on," 
Peterson said. "[Hazing] is a felony pun- 
ishable by a fine of no less than $500 and 
no more than $5,000 and/or imprisonment 
in the county jail for no more than one 
year." 

Baseball and Softball 

Softball head coach and Assistant Ath- 
letics Director Debbie Day said that there 
is no hazing on the team. 

"I'm new on campus, so I guess hazing 
on campus would be a new subject for me," 
Day said. "1 think we develop an aware- 



ness of what is and is not appropriate team 
behavior. I guess I hear rumors all the time 
and I don't know that rumors are accurate. 
I think there are a lot of rumors here." 

One of the baseball players said that 
some of the team bonding outside of prac- 
tice involves get-togethers and teasing. He 
said there isn't anything he would consider 
hazing on the team; no one is forced to do 
anything. 

"It's just guys being guys," he said. 
"It's like a brotherhood. It's a team, and 
the only way to win is to be one unit. If 
you have dissension among the ranks, then 
winning becomes more difficult." 

Soccer 

Soccer head coach Dan Kuntz said that 
there is no hazing on the team, nor has it 
ever been a problem. 

"In our preseason meetings, we go 
over the problems that are inherent in that 
kind of behavior [and] we let them know 
the consequences of participating in that," 
Kuntz said. "We try to reinforce it through- 

"I guess I hear rumors all 
the time and I don't know 
that rumors are accurate. 
I think there are a lot of 
rumors here." 

Debbie Day 
Assistant Athletics Director 

out the year as best we can." 

Kuntz said that, based on his experi- 
ence at CLU, the players have always 
worked hard to respect each other. 

"One of the things I love about CLU is 
that the players do care about each other," 
he said. "I think it is a big part of trying 
to maintain programs that are positive for 
students, period. If anything, you want to 
make sure that people have an experience 
where they don't feel threatened. We hope 
that students carry themselves representing 



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themselves, their athletic programs [and] 
their school." 

Two players on the men's soccer team 
said that none of the team rituals are forced 
on them or their teammates. 

"A couple times a year we have team 
barbecues," one player said. "We go to Club 
Lu nights and try to hook up the freshmen 
and get them to meet new people." 

There is also no hazing on the wom- 
en's team. Team bonding comes through 
team dinners and get-togethers. 

"We have have pasta parties through- 
out the season," freshman Danielle Erquia- 
ga said. "You get really close because you 
hang out with each other between practices 
and games." 

Football 

Football head coach Scott Squires 
said that he and the team use orientation 
to discourage hazing among the players in 
which the team goes to an off-campus site 
for two or three days, allowing the players 
and coaches to know each other. 

"I think that some of the things we 
do in terms of our orientation could be 
construed as a way of uniting the guys 
together," he said. "I think it's in a positive 
environment where everybody's doing it, 
coaches included, not just one guy. We get 
to know them; they get to know us. There's 
a bond that I think is created there, a sense 
of team unity." 

One football player said that he has 
not seen any hazing on the football team. 
The older members try to make sure that 
all of the players, especially the younger 
ones, give their full effort at practice and 
understand how the team works. 

"What I saw, mainly," he said, "is that 
all the freshmen really gave it their hard- 
est. Maybe only a couple guys got jumped 
on. That's only because you can really 
recognize if they're not trying and they're 
just being lazy, but that's just effortwise. 
If someone, even if they're a junior, is not 
even trying hard, you just try to tell them, 



"I think some of the stuff 
is, they're afraid of the 
freshmen taking their 
spots, so freshmen do 
get a lot." 

Anonymous 
CLU Football Player 

'Hey, step it up a bit.'" 

Chad Brown, a junior on the football 
team, said that everyone on the team gets 
along and is close. Team bonding comes 
from weekend activities and trips to the 
beach to welcome the team's freshmen. 

Another football player said that what 
little hazing there is on the team includes 
pranks such as taking the freshmen's 
clothes and pouring ice down their backs 
at practice. He said that the coach probably 
knows about some of what happens, but 
does not need to worry, as the pranks are 
not serious. 

"I think some of the stuff is, they're 
afraid of the freshmen taking their spots, so 
freshmen do get a lot. But if the freshmen 
come in and don't take the shit, they don't 
mess with them," he said. 

Consequences of Hazing 

Bryde said that he has not heard about 
hazing among teams at CLU and that pre- 
venting hazing is more of an educational 
effort than just administering consequenc- 
es. 

"Fortunately, there hasn't been any 
physical endangerment involved in most of 
these things," he said. "To my knowledge, 
we don't have it. I hope this hasn't been 
driven underground or anything like that." 

Note: Not all of the CLU coaches 
and student-athletes were available to 
be interviewed. Of the athletes that were 
contacted, some declined to be inter- 
viewed. 



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4 The Echo 



Features 



May 7, 2003 



Campus Quotes 



What are you up to this summer? 




Anthony Unchangco, sports med. major, 
class of 2004 



Lisa McFadden, business finance major, Taylor Towne, communication major, class of Katie Boss, business major, class of 2006 
class of 2005 2006 



"I'm going to be a camp director at a "I'm working a lot, hopefully going to the "Going to the beach, hanging out with friends "Working to eam money to invest at the 
YMCA away camp." beach and having fun." and working for money to spend with and on less-than-nothing interest rates, surfing and 

my friends and going to concerts." seeing New Found Glory." 




Austin Aker, biology major, class of 2006 Seth Blundell, biology major, class of 2006 



"I'm going to go back to Minnesota, play a 
lot of golf, be in and on the lake a lot, and 
work a little. And I'm looking forward to re- 
laxing and not having a care in the world." 



"I'm going to work at the country club golf 
course, but I am looking forward to spend- 
ing the summer with my girlfriend whom 
I haven't seen in forever, and read a lot and 
write a lot of music." 



David Huber, accounting major, class of 
2006 

"I'm looking forward to working and being 
single." 



Nick Gordon, undeclared major, class of 
2005 

"I'm going to work at Camp Yolijwa." 



Campus Quotes are compiled by Jon Gonzales 



Rotaract club helps out an 
elementary school in Mexico 



By Karly Wilhelm 

Opinion editor 



California Lutheran University's 
Rotaract club traveled to Mexicali, Mex- 
ico to restore an elementary school from 
April 25 to April 27. The 13 members 
who attended not only worked alongside 
Rotaract members from the Mexicali 
area, but also stayed in a local members' 
home during the weekend. 

California and Mexico members 
worked at the Escuela Felipa Velasquez 
picking up trash, painting playground 
equipment and classrooms and planting 
vegetation. 

"We're mostly repainting because 
a new coat of paint goes a long way. 
Around the edges of the school there's 
no vegetation, it's just rocks and dirt, 
so we bought some of the native trees 
and have been planting them all around 



the edges of the playground," said CLU 
Rotaract President Josh Kramer. 

Along with fixing local schools, 
Mexicali Rotaract members, who come 
from the local community, work with 
other organizations such as orphanages. 

"[During Christmas, in the orphan- 
age, we] gave them food, a Christmas 
tree, presents [and] we played with the 
kids," said Mexicali Rotaract member 
Myrna Acosta Mejia. 

Mejia also said that the children in 
the orphanage gave many of the presents 
they received to other, poorer children. 

Despite the difficult work refurbish- 
ing the school, every Rotaract member 
was pleased with the changes. 

"I'm excited for the progress that we 
are making. The project we decided to 
do is very important and needed to be 
done," said Rotaract Adviser Lindsay 
Miller. 




Photograph courtesy of Karly Wilhelm 



California Lutheran University Rotaract members move large tires to plant and place in 
the playground of Escuela Felipa Velasquez. 



May 7, 2003 



The Echo 5 



Arts 

CLU student Brianne Davis 
competes for Mehron award 



By Cameron Brown 
Staff writer 



As a student of California Lutheran 
University, senior Brianne Davis has re- 
vealed her talent and expertise as a make- 
up artist for CLU's drama department. 
Her designs have won recognition by the 
American College Theatre Festival and a 
finalist position in the national competi- 
tion. 

Davis is graduating with a BA in com- 
munication with an emphasis in public 
relations and advertising, and a BA in 
drama with an emphasis in performance. 
When Davis decided to take Drama 451, a 
class specifically geared toward make-up 
design, she realized her potential. 



Davis was asked to do the make-up 
for CLU's production of Noel Coward's 
"Hay Fever." 

"The show and my designs were 
entered in the American College The- 
atre Festival and both were judged and 
forwarded to the regional competition in 
Utah, back in February 2003," Davis said, 
"CLU was in Region 8, which included 
such states as Utah, Nevada, Hawaii, Ari- 
zona and California." 

According to Davis, the competition 
consisted of three rounds. The first round 
was based on a question-and-answer fo- 
rum that was open to the public. In the 
following round, a panel of judges graded 
each design accordingly. Then the finalists 
were announced and the judges graded the 



entries once more. 

Davis's design won the regional com- 
petition and earned her an all-expenses 
paid paid fellowship to Washington, DC, 
as well as a place in the national competi- 
tion. 

"The award, specifically, was the Meh- 
ron Make-Up Award. Mehron is one of the 
nation s leading stage and film make-up 
companies," Davis said. "In D.C., I spent 
four days, in classes with Randy Mercer, 
a famous make-up artist whose work 
includes 'Cabaret,' 'The Producers' and 
'Flower Drum Song,' all of which have 
been on Broadway in New York." 

Mercer was a large influence on her 
and revealed many secrets pertaining to 
the make-up field, Davis said. She said 



Mercer enhanced her learning experiences 
a great deal. 

At the national festival in D.C., Davis 
was one of the 10 finalists for the make- 
up competition. Although she didn't win 
the national competition, she was undis- 
mayed. 

"I never expected to get this far on 
my first design. Even though I didn't win, 
I learned more than the prize could have 
ever taught me," Davis said. 

Davis said that all her accomplish- 
ments never would have been possible 
without the cast and crew of "Hay Fever," 
the drama department. Randy Toland, 
Michael Amdt and, of course, Lolita Ball, 
who taught her everything there is to know 
about drama and design. 



CD review 



ISSy is waging 



"Fever to Tell" war 0n s P ammers 

-M_ ^LS ^/ M. w \*W -M_ ^S M. M. PerhaDS vou have taken advan- if vou suspect some of vour welcomi 



By Trevor Kelley 
Staff writer 



"Fever To Tell" is the long, long, long- 
awaited debut disc from Brooklyn's own 
Yeah Yeah Yeahs, and it's a bit of a small 
miracle that it was actually released last 
week by major media empire Universal. 
For some people — mostly those who stay 
out on school nights and wake up smell- 
ing like mixed drinks the next day — this 
was a very big deal. It is within this dis- 
tinct group that the Yeah Yeah Yeahs have 
been deemed the latest hope for rock mu- 
sic, and deemed better than the Strokes 
and the Vines and all those other bands 
with the word "the" in their name. 

There's only one problem: "Fever To 
Tell" is not as great as you hoped, but as 
disappointing as you feared. Sorry, hip- 
ster. Deal with it. 

Instead, "Fever To Tell" is a dizzy- 
ing, lopsided debut that hits as often as 
it misses. Sure, guitarist Nick Zinner is 
still a buzz-saw of early-'80s angular 
rock trickery, lighting the fuse on songs 
like "Black Tongue" and "Date With A 
Knight" before firing them off as rock- 
ets toward the marquee moon. Drum- 
mer Brian Chase and vocalist Karen O 
aren't phoning it in, either (especially 



on the opener "Rich"), but there is still 
something about "Fever To Tell" that 
stings of static. Twenty minutes and 
seven songs in, it seems like any group 
of talentless dullards could walk a mile in 
the band's pleather Chuck Taylors, save 
the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. It turns out they 
took a cab: waving farewell to mindless 
afterthoughts ("Tick") and half-baked 
rockers ("Man") as they disappear in the 
rear-view mirror. 

Then something strange and sort of 
special occurs: the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, 
despite themselves, stumble upon at 
least half of an incredible record. Just 
as the group finally rolls over to find the 
album's centerpiece, "Maps," "Fever To 
Tell" becomes less about how the Yeah 
Yeah Yeahs "rock" and more about how 
they don't. In an amazing bit of irony, 
the best songs on "Fever To Tell" are 
also the slowest to reward, buzzing with 
more inner beauty tenderness than outer- 
limits cool. As O serenades her lover on 
the album's closer, "Modern Romance," 
it sounds like an innocent kiss shared 
beneath a city of sin. And, for a moment, 
the world is theirs — even though they're 
about 20 minutes too late. 

But let's keep hope: maybe next time 
they'll take the express train. 



Perhaps you have taken advan- 
tage of CLU's "No Spam" screening 
facility.which prevents unwanted e-mail 
from reaching your In-Box. For in- 
stance, when those who receive unwant- 
ed and/or offensive e-mail forward such 
communication to nospam@clunet.edu, 
the CLU gateway automatically stops 
such mail. 

To further improve your computing 
experience at CLU, the ISS department 
is utilizing new software to stop spam 
messages. Basically, the service blocks 
known IP address offenders (the list 
is provided by an outside service) and 
returns unwanted e-mail back to the 
sender. 

Already ISS has blocked an average 
of 7,000 to 8,000 messages a day. Be 
aware, though; a good thing can some- 
times be an inconvenience. For instance. 



if you suspect some of your welcome 
mail is not getting through, send a re- 
quest to nospam@clunet.edu asking the 
service to unblock mail from a specific 
and legitimate sender. 

ISSy reminds you that any unwanted 
mail that does reach your mailbox can be 
reported to nospam@clunet.edu. If you 
have any questions, please contact the 
Help Desk (x3698 or help@clunet.edu). 




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6 The Echo 



Opinion 



May 7, 2003 



O 



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How to 
Respond 



Mail 

Letters to the Editor 

Calif. Lutheran University 

60 W. Olsen Road, #3650 

Thousand Oaks, CA 91360 

Phone 

(805) 493-3465 

E-mail 

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Letters to the editor 

are welcome on any topic 

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Letters must include the 

writer's name, year/position 

and major/department. 

Letters are subject to editing 
for space and clarity. 



Printing 
Schedule 



The Echo will not be published 
on the following date: 

May 14, 2003 



Suite selection: flawed 




By Michele Hatler 
Editor in chief 



The suite selection that took place this 
year for next fall's housing alarmed me a 
little. I didn't realize that putting students 
in housing was so difficult, but after recent 
events, I've begun to question the profes- 
sionalism of the residence life office. 

The first setback was the senior hous- 



ing. Those who will be seniors next year 
have been anticipating living in the senior 
apartments. Housing works by a lottery, 
and those with the lowest numbers get 
to choose first. The suite selection clearly 
states that groups of four seniors or three 
seniors and a junior can sign up for an 
apartment. But apparently, not all of us 
had to follow those rules. Groups got to 
sign up with students who weren't seniors 
or even juniors by credit standing. Due to 
mistakes made in the residence life office, 
some seniors can't live in the apartments 
because of a group of juniors or second 
-year seniors who can still play football. 
My roommates and I were assigned to the 
wrong room after specifically picking out 
the one that we wanted. 

The next thing was the situations with 
the houses. One group of students didn't 
qualify for a house because one of their ap- 



plicants was said to have too many write- 
ups. As it turns out, the student only had 
one write-up but they didn't get a house. A 
group of juniors were "promised" a house 
and didn't get one so they got first pick at 
the senior apartments. I understand if the 
residence life office made a mistake, but it 
is not acceptable that juniors get to live in 
the senior apartments. There are a certain 
amount of houses and rooms. I can't figure 
out why it is that difficult to take the num- 
ber of students and the number of rooms 
and have it run smoothly. 

I'm not sure what to suggest to the 
residence life office for a more success- 
ful suite selection for next year. This 
year, a lot of students are unhappy with 
how things turned out and I don't think 
it's justifiable. If residence life is going 
to make rules, they need to follow them 
without biases. 



Letter to the Editor 



Dear Echo: 

"Having a daughter is like having a 
toilet in front of the house" — this Asian 
saying represents the discrimination 
against women in Myanmar society. Asian 
countries are mainly governed by culture 
and religion. Buddhism, the most practiced 
religion in Asia, discriminates against 
women, and the society openly oppresses 
women more than men. 

In Buddhist cultures, men are more 
respected than women and are given a 
powerful status. The reason is nothing 
more than parents' concern about premari- 
tal sex. 

Parents, in general, are very afraid that 
their daughters may be put in a situation 
where they are enticed or forced to have 
premarital sex. Also, conservative parents 
are very concerned about their status in 
society: a daughter's loose behavior may 
result in their loss of status in the com- 
munity. Therefore, parents push their sons 
and daughters to practice monogamous 
relationships along with the Five Precepts 
of Buddhism. 

One of the Five Precepts of Buddhism 
warns all Buddhists not to misuse sex. All 
pure Buddhists must avoid committing 
sexual misconduct with any partner. Such 
precepts are more like rules than fixed laws 
that everyone must follow. However, the 



idea is that since all Buddhists are expected 
to have high morals in society, they must 
follow and abide by the Five Precepts. Fur- 
thermore, the religion teaches Buddhists 
not to be greedy, and this rule is applied to 
relationships as well. Sexual cravings and 
vanities, which are likely to be manifested 
in one's sex life, tempt Buddhists to stop 
following the Five Precepts (and fail to be 
honored in society). Greed will result in 
one's suffering, so to achieve Nirvana, one 
must avoid all kinds of greed. 

During Buddha's time, celibacy was 
highly practiced. The reason was because 
non-celibates often ended up having un- 
prepared sexual intercourse, resulting in 
children. The growing numbers of chil- 
dren made the parents spend more time 
with them and not on their religion. As 
time progressed, such ancient rules have 
evolved into more liberated guidelines. All 
Buddhists do not live up to those precepts 
or Buddha's perception on premarital sex. 
In Theravada Buddhism, abortion is not 
discussed in society, especially among 
religious groups. 

When abortion has to be done, it is 
secretly performed because such shame 
would defame the family. 

Myanmar, formerly known as Burma, 
practices Theravada Buddhism. In Myan- 
mar, the media does not educate society 
about sex. In fact, in 1997, condom com- 
mercials came to an end because officials 



were afraid to confront criticism made by 
the conservative population. Religious 
groups believed that the promotion of 
condoms encouraged sexual promiscuity 
among youth. 

Sales of condoms were illegal in 
Myanmar until 1 993, and today, the cost of 
three condoms is equivalent to 500 kyats 
($1.50). However, most of the working 
classes cannot afford 500 kyats, because 
it equates to the average monthly wage. 
Therefore, the lack of education and the 
country's falling economy alarmingly 
spreads HIV, and ultimately AIDS, espe- 
cially at the borders of Thailand, China 
and India. Unfortunately, the government 
is still ignoring the problem facing the 
country and claims that Myanmar will be 
protected by the religious and traditional 
boundaries that discourage sexual promis- 
cuity. 

Even some Theravada Buddhists now 
believe that the government must endorse 
and fund sexual education campaigns. 
Also, the government should permit for- 
eign aid to improve the current conditions. 
With such developments, especially at the 
national borders, Myanmar could no doubt 
control the rising rate of HIV and AIDS. 

Hazel Zaw 

Class of 2005 

Business Communication 



The 



Echo Staff 



Michele Hatler 
Editor in Chief 

Yvette Ortiz 

Circulation/ 
Managing Editor 

Amanda Horn 

Business Manager 

Brett Rowland 
News Editor 

Karen Peterson 
Arts & Features Editor 

Karly Wilhelm 
Opinon Editor 



Katie Bashaw 
Sports Editor 

Scott Gasperino 
Photo Editor 

Eric Ingemunson 
Online Editor 

Brittney Carter 
Copy Editor 

Heather Molloy 
Proofreader 

Dr. Dru Pagliassotti 
Adviser 



Editorial Mailer: The staff of The Echo welcomes conuoenu 
on its articles as well as oo the oewspaper itself. However, the 
staff acknowledges that opinions presented do not necessarily 
represent the views of the ASCLU or of California Lutheran 
University. The Echo reserves the right to edit all stories, 
editorials, letters to the editor and other submissions for space 
.restrictions, accuracy and style. All submissions become 
property of The Echo. 



Advertising Matter: Except as clearly implied by the advertis- 
ing party of otherwise specifically stated advertisements in The 
Echo are inserted by commercial activities or ventures identi- 
fied in the advertisements themselves and not by California 
Lutheran University. Advertising materia] printed herein is 
solely for informational purposes. Such printing is not to be 
construed as a written and implied sponsorship, endorsement. 
or Investigation of such commercial enterprises or ventures. 
Complaints concerning advertisements in The Echo should be 
directed to the business manager at (805) 493-3865. 



Inquiries: Inquiries about this newspaper should be addressed 
to (he Editor in Chief. The Echo, California Lutheran Univer- 
sity, 60 West Olsen Road. Thousand Oaks, CA 92360-2787. 
Telephone.' (805) 493-3465: Fan: (805) 493-3327; E-mail 
echoSclunet.edu. 



May 7, 2003 



Sports 



The Echo 7 



Rucinski and Ham: Model Golf team 



scholar-athletes honored 



By Alex Espinoza 
Staff Writer 



Cal Lutheran athletes Alix Rucinski 
and Tom Ham were named to the 2003 
NCAA SCIAC-Scholar Athlete Team. 
Ham is a member of the cross-country and 
track teams and Rucinski is on the Regals 
soccer team. This prestigious honor is 
awarded to those student-athletes who ex- 
cel on the field as well as in the classroom. 

Ham is a senior and an art major. He 
has been captain for the cross-country and 
track teams for the past two years. 

He was selected to be captain by his 
teammates. As a distance runner he has 
been named to the All-SCIAC team the 
last two years. 

Track coach Scott Fickerson praised 



Ham for his active participation on and off 
the field. On top of being a two-sport ath- 
lete, Ham has been on the church council 
and a department assistant. 

"Tom is a leader by example; he works 
hard and brings a certain competitiveness 
that's balanced by light-heartedness. The 
thing I respect most about him is that he 
has done all this while maintaining a 3.9 
GPA," said Fickerson. 

Rucinski is a senior majoring in biol- 
ogy. This season the forward led the team 
in goals (10), assists (five) and points 
(25). This year, she was named to the All- 
SCIAC First Team for the third time in her 
career. Rucinski helped guide the Regals to 
an 11-6-2 overall record and a share of the 
SCIAC Championship Title. 



brought leadership and an excellent work 
ethic to the table. Junior Pam Clark, a 
teammate of Rucinski for three years, ex- 
pressed her respect for her teammate. 

"She is a real fun girl to be around. 
All the girls on the team respect her for 
what she does. She is a real hard worker 
and once she sets her mind on something, 
there's no stopping her," said Clark. 

Senior Annie Pham echoed Clark's 
sentiments. 

"On the field she is a smart player; she 
really knows the game. Off the field she's 
a real character. She's just real fun to be 
around," said Pham. 

Rucinski and Ham will be honored for 
their achievements along with all the other 
senior athletes at a CLU banquet Friday 



Being a senior on the team, Rucinski night before graduation in the Pavilion. 

Athletes of the Year come 
from fall sports teams 



By Cassandra Wolf 
Staff Writer 



Sally Jahraus and David Oviedo of the 
volleyball and football teams, respectively, 
were named CLU's Athletes of the Year for 
2002-03. 

Jahraus made the First All-SCIAC 
Team this year and last year. She also led 
fhe Regals in kills (308) and digs (336) this 
year. 

"Sally was the mainstay in our vol- 
leyball program for the last four years," 
Athletics Director Bruce Bryde said. "She 
was a good player and a team leader." 

"I got to play with her for four years 
and we became good friends off the court," 
teammate and senior Jamie Arnold said. 



"She always put together care pack- 
ages and good luck cards before big 
games," sophomore and teammate Lindsay 
Bufkin said. "She's always there for you, 
she supported all of her teammates and she 
understands volleyball. She is the most 
thoughtful and the best. I love her." 

Oviedo made the Second All-SCIAC 
and the Verizon All-Academic District 
VIII teams and led the Kingsmen in tackles 
(84), 12 of which were for loss, this year. 
A tackle for loss is made behind the line of 
scrimmage. He has made All-SCIAC for 
four consecutive years. 

"I would describe him as very in- 
tense," defensive line coach Will Plemons 
said. "He was very tough and he led by 
example. He was a leader every year in de- 



fense. What made him a special player was 
that he was a great student athlete." 

"He wasn't very a vocal guy, per se," 
senior and teammate Casey O'Brian said. 
"He definitely displayed leadership on the 
field. He is the heart and soul of the de- 
fense. Everyone liked him and he got along 
with everyone. Regardless of whether we 
were playing a league opponent or not, he 
gave 110 percent." 

"We've been friends since freshman 
year," junior and teammate Jay Morris 
said. "He's not outspoken; just a relaxed 
kind of guy. He wasn't a leader vocally, but 
he made his statements with great plays on 
the field. He's a fun guy to be around." 

The Student Athlete Committee voted 
on the recipients of this honor. 



Scholar-athletes balance two lives 

Men's Track & Field 
Matthew Broussard 
Matthew Carlson 
Marcus Green 
Grady Guy 
Tom Ham 
Andrew Miller 
Derek Rogers 
Jonathon Siebrecht 
Scott Siegfried 

Women's Track & Field 
Jonea Boysen 
Emma Holman 
Kirsten Madsen 
Dereem McKinney 
Lauren Mooney 
Lindsey Moore 
Courtney Parks 
Ashleigh Poulin 

Volleyball 
Jamie Arnold 
Lindsay Bufkin 
Sally Jahraus 
Cassandra Jones 
Katie Schneider 



Student-athletes with a 


Women's Basketball 


Women's Soccer 


3.25 GPA or better include: 


Brusta Brown 


Maria Bueschen 




Julie Cichon 


Michelle Chandler 


Football 


Alex Mallen 


Pam Clark 


Robert Boland 


Katie Oskey 


Alix Rucinski 


Robert Fisher 




Lindsey Rarick 


Micah Hamilton 


Men's Cross Country 




David Oviedo 


John Cummings 


Softball 


Kyle Paterik 


Dan Ham 


Kellie Kocher 




Tom Ham 


Erin Lafata 


Baseball 




Esmerelda Macias 


Doug Carnett 


Women's Cross Country 


Gianna Regal 


Jason Hirsh 


Emma Holman 


Monica Shallert 


Mark Nishimura 


Courtney Parks 




Tim Penprase 


Jamie Pearcy 


Men's Tennis 


Brian Skaug 


Carly Sandell 


Karlo Arapovic 


Brandon Sontag 




Junya Hasebe 




Men's Soccer 


Joel Wetterholm 


Golf 


Saul Aguilar 




Austin Aker 


Gregory Allen 


Women's Tennis 


Matt Holland 


Brian Blevins 


Amy Hobden 


Jason Poyser 


Jason Block 


Amanda Howie 




Valentino Diaz 


Rebecca Hunau 


Men's Basketball 


Blaise Djeugoue 


Blair Murphy 


Noah Brocious . 


Dan Ermolovich 


Lisa Novajosky 


Ron Russ 


Matt Jordan 


Stephanie Perkins 




C.J. Kridner 


Jessie Thompson 




Kevin Stone 





finishes 
fourth in 
SCIAC 



By Luke Patten 
Staff Wrtter 



The California Lutheran golf team 
wrapped up its season last week with 
the SCIAC Championships. The team 
shot 603 for the 36-hole tournament and 
finished in fourth place. The team also 
finished fourth place in the final overall 
conference standings. 

The Kingsmen shot 315 during the 
first round, then bounced back, shooting 
288 over the final 18 holes. 

"That second round you could say 
was our best round of 1 8 during the sea- 
son," said sophomore Jason Poyser. "It 
was a bit of an easier course, but four of 
us played really well as well." 

Junior Jordan Silvertrust agreed 
that the team played well and thought 
that the tournament showed what the 
young team will be capable of next 
year. 

"The team played well, so it was a 
good note to end the season on," said 
Silvertrust. "I thought we played well 
this year even though we were inexperi- 
enced. Next year will be good; we lose 
Matt Holland, but we got some fresh- 
men and a few recruits coming in. I 
thought we finished strong." 

Silvertrust also received individual 
recognition during the week, being 
named to the all conference second 
team. He and Holland were also named 
to the Academic All-American team as 
well. 

"I'm happy. My goal at the start 
of the year was at worst to get second 
team. Then I shot an 84 to start the year 
and I got a little nervous. I just hap- 
pened to play well in SCIAC play. I 
was really proud to be named Academic 
All-American as well, because that's 
what it's all about. It was good; I was 
happy," said Silvertrust. 



Teams with the highest 
combined GPA: 



MEN 

cross-country 3.42 

track & field 3.29 

tennis 3.14 

WOMEN 

volleyball 3.47 

tennis 3.40 

cross-country 3.31 



CLU athletes have a 

higher combined GPA 

than the student body as 

a whole. 



8 The Echo 



Sports 



May 7. 2003 



Kingsmen end season 
with swe ep of Redlands 



By Sean-Micheal Porter 
Staff Writer 



The California Lutheran baseball team 
finished the regular season on a good note 
as it completed a three-game sweep of 
Redlands, winning 10-1 on Friday, May 2, 
in Thousand Oaks and then winning 12-4 
and 18-6 Sunday, May 4, in Redlands. 

The double-header was supposed to 
be played on Saturday, but was rained out 
after two innings of play. The first game 
of the double-header picked up on Sunday 
when senior Ryan Melvin threw a com- 
plete game giving up just two earned runs 
and striking out four. Melvin picked up his 
sixth win of the year. 

"Ryan Melvin pitched a hell of a 
game," said senior Luke Stajcar. 

Senior Jason Claros also played an im- 
pressive game, going 3-for-5 with four RBI 
and two runs scored including a double and 
a home run. 



In the last game of the regular season 
for CLU, senior J.R. Cortez saved his best 
performance for last as he hit for the cycle. 
He was a perfect 4-for-4 with three RBI 
and four runs. Cortez tripled in the first in- 
ning, hit a home run in the third, singled in 
the fourth and doubled in the fifth. 

"It was a cool thing to see," senior 
Matt James said. "We were all rooting for 
that last double." 

The Cortez cycle was the first cycle 
for any Kingsmen this year. Not to be 
outdone, senior Taylor Slimak was 3-for-3 
with six RBI and three runs scored as he 
hit two jacks. 

"We had a great all-around perfor- 
mance today," said Slimak. 

It was junior Jason Hirsh who set the 
tone for the series with a commanding out- 
ing for Cal Lu in Friday's game. In the last 
home game for CLU, Hirsh put an excla- 
mation point on his stellar season, pitching 
for his sixth complete game of the year. He 



struck out 17 Bulldog batters, one short of 
the school record, which is held by Hirsh. 

The Kingsmen batters were swing- 
ing away as senior Brian Skaug. Slimak, 
and junior Ed Edsall played solid games. 
Skaug had two hits, including a triple and a 
double. Slimak hammered a two-run home 
run and Edsall went 2-for-3 with two runs 
scored. 

Cal Lu will have to get some help from 
a couple of teams in order to make post- 
season play. 

"We finished up strong," James said. 
"We did what we had to do." 

"I'm glad we ended on a good note," 
said Stajcar. 

Friday's game was the last home game 
for 10 CLU seniors, including Claros, Ryan 
Cooney, Cortez, James, Brad Marcelino, 
Melvin, Jeff Meyers, Slimak, Stajcar and 
Justin Thomas. 

Should the Kingsmen qualify for post- 
season play, games will begin on May 16. 



TRACK 


200m - Denise French 


Pole Vault - Ashleigh Poulin 


ALL-SCIAC 
TEAM 


5th place, 27.04 
400m - Denise French 


4th place, 2.59m 
Long Jump - Denise French 


4th place, 1 :00.44 


5th place, 5.04m 


*THE TOP SIX FINISHERS 


800m - Lindsey Moore 


100m - Marcus Green 


at the SCIAC Cham- 


4th place, 2:23.55 


3rd place, 1 1 .25 


pionship MEET QUALIFY 
FOR ALL-SCIAC HON- 
ORS 


1 500m - Heather Worden 
4th place, 4:55.81 


1500m - Tom Ham 

6th place, 4:12.59 




3000m ST - Emma Holman 


1 1 OH - Grant Kincade 




6th place, 12:36.2 


2nd place, 15.68 



INTRAMURAL NEWS 

Chips & Salsa roll over Sloppy Seconds for the spring 
basketball title while Daryl Strawberry's Third Strike 
demolishes Pink Bunny Rabbits with One Foot in softball. 



DARYL STRAWBERRY 29 
PINK BUNNY RABBITS 18 

ALL STARS 

Jimmy Fox and Brendan Garret 



CHIPS & SALSA 60 
SLOPPY SECONDS 54 

all stars 

Brian Cochran and Landon Ray 




pnotograplTcourtesyol the \ntramural Ottice 

2003 Spring Intramural Softball Champions DARYL STRA W- 
BERRYS THR1D STRIKE: Kyle Palerik. Katie Schneider. Ryan 
Tukua, Chad Brown. Kasi Benhrook, co-captain Brent Baier. 
Beau Kimbrel. Christie Barker. Lindsay Rarik. co-captain 
Jimmy Fox and Leif Palmquist. 




tie Intramural 

2003 Spring Intramural Basketball Champions CHIPS & SALSA: 
Justin Barkhuff, Brian Cochran. Wes Johnson, JJ Grey. 
Tia Cochran, captain Joey Montano and Matt Anderson. 



Tennis 
can't win 
at West 
Regionals 



By Victor Esquer 
Staff Writer 



The Cal Lutheran men's tennis 
team was defeated in the NCAA West 
Regional on Saturday. CLU was de- 
feated by SCIAC foe Redlands, 7-0. 
The Kingsmen had defeated Redlands 
twice earlier in the season, 5-2. In the 
No. 1 singles match. Amir Marandy was 
upset by Brian Murphy 0-6, 6-4, 7-5. 
Marandy and Jeremy Quinlan were also 
defeated in the No. 1 doubles match 8- 
3, by Murphy and Rob Candiotti. 

"It was definitely a disappointment. 
Being seventh in the nation was nice, 
but of course we wanted to be No. I. To 
hopefully make things better I am going 
to do my best to bring home the singles 
title for us: other than that, it has been 
great playing with these guys," said 
Marandy. 

The Kingsmen finished the season 
with a 15-4 overall record and they tied 
Redlands for second place in SCIAC 
with an 8-2 mark. Marandy, the SCIAC 
player of the year, finished the season 
with a record of 22-1 in singles play. 

Senior Sean Ruitenberg was 
pleased with the team's performance 
this year. 

"It was an extraordinary year for us. 
We definitely stepped it up to another 
level, which was cracking the top 10 in 
the nation. Since we had a new team, it 
was a great accomplishment this year. It 
definitely brought us closer as a team," 
said Ruitenberg. 

The Regals women's tennis team 
was also unsuccessful in its quest to- 
ward a national championship. In its 
first-ever trip to the NCAA postseason, 
the CLU women's tennis team was shut 
out 9-0 by Trinity University in Texas 
on Saturday. 

Trinity swept all six singles match- 
es and all three doubles matches. All- 
SCIAC selection Becca Hunau was de- 
feated 6-4, 6-1 by Berica Day in the No. 
2 singles. Lisa Novajosky took Heather 
McGowan into three sets but then was 
defeated in the tiebreaker, 10-6. 

"It has been such a great season for 
us; of course we would have liked to go 
all the way, but we accomplished things 
that no other team had done in the past 
this season, and that is something we 
can take into next season," said Hunau. 

"Yeah, we're upset, but we are very 
proud of what we have accomplished 
this year. I can't wait to start getting 
ready for next season." said Novajosky. 



this week's Kingsmen & 
Regals action 

Friday, May 9 

SOFTBALL at WEST 
REGIONALS 

Pacific Lutheran, Tacoma, WA 

DOUBLE ELIMINATION TOURNAMENT, 
FIRST GAME 

v. Chapman University